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Overlay Project & Sawing Technique Tutorial...Complete 21 Jan 13

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Author Topic: Overlay Project & Sawing Technique Tutorial...Complete 21 Jan 13  (Read 1476 times)
Steve
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« on: January 17, 2013, 09:22:46 pm »

Alright..............I finished the written and photo tutorial several days ago but I didn't know how to down load the videos.  On a lark I tried again to do one on FB...................and to my total surprise it worked this time..........The bummer is that I don't remember what I did............so I can start and up-date as I can................

Coming soon..............
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RockIt2Me
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« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2013, 04:27:45 am »

Great....I can't saw worth a crap and need help.
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Nancie
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« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2013, 04:48:30 am »

Looking forward to it.  toocool2
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« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2013, 12:37:14 pm »

Multi-layer Overlay Project & Sawing Technique Tutorial

OK, due to popular demand I have put together this tutorial on my method for creating and executing a hand cut overlay piece using photos and movies of my sawing technique.  This might take a little time as it takes forever to down-load the videos to FB and there are a total of five.

First of all I would like to let everyone know that I have been doing hand cut overlay and shadowbox for over 20 years now and there is definite muscle memory involved in doing so.

For this project I have chosen to use the Unicorn from Kurt’s (asianfire) Shield Project in order to explain how my method for doing multi-layered overlay is done.  I’ll also explain the method development to which I employ in making my patterns.

Before I learned how to use a computer, and some computer programs (now going on 14 years) I used to draw things out by hand.  Now I use the Internet, computer programs and hand drawn to get what I want.

Preparing the Design Concept for Construction

I searched the web for Unicorns and horses and found several possibilities, and finally approving this one……………



Next, I down loaded the jpeg to my desired file, opened the file in a simple photo program I have – “PhotoImpressions 3.0”, played with it a bit and printed a hard copy.  Tracing a copy in pencil allowed me to change the position of extremities and eliminate some things that fit better in the design concept.



When designing things, keep to the basic lines of design…………….Detail doesn’t come until the piece is together.

(I have a ¼” graph paper that I scanned into my computer and know where to print it at 100% scale)



In my next step:  I imported the finalized Unicorn jpeg into the photo program for sizing to fit the project and make a pattern on the graph paper to follow when cutting the different pieces.






I then made a grid of patterns, saved to a file and printed a copy.  It takes four of these to layout the Unicorn.



That’s pretty much how I make the patterns for cutting on my projects…………..

Now on to the actual pattern set-up, parts cutting and soldering…………….

Since it takes four patterns to complete the Unicorn project, cut them from the printed pattern grid, designate which one is for which part.

Steps for pattern set-up:

1.   Determine and select the gauge of metals per level to be used. I used:
a.   Top mane – 22g brass - to show depth in the mane
b.   Top body – 26g sterling - to show main body
c.   Mane and tail – 26g brass – to show color - this and the above layer will show enough body depth
d.   Back body – 20g sterling – this adds the final depth to the piece
2.   Measure the pieces to get the size of the metal needed for that piece
3.   Cut the metal
4.   Clean it (I use a medium satin finish wheel – it’s like a 3-M pad – this adds a little ‘tooth’ for the Elmer’s Glue to stick to)



5.   Glue the pattern to the metal pieces – I use a Q-Tip to spread the glue and water-soluble Elmer’s Glue-All so it’s easy to remove the pattern once cut out.  Also in this step use something to press the pattern to the metal and squeegee out the excess glue.  I use an old piston wrist pin from an 80” H-D motor.



6.   Drill any through holes for saw blade pass-through on pieced with inner design cut outs – in this case the brass mane and tail piece where the tail is connected to the mane close to the tip of the tail. This is done for strengthening the tail so it doesn’t bend in finished mode.

7.   Cut the pieces out – When cutting pieces I always start with the inner parts that need to be cut.  This maintains the metal’s strength to discourage bending from the resistance from the saw blade drag.  If you do this from the outside to the inside cutting, by the time you get to the inner cutting the metal has weakened strength and it will bend while sawing.

This is the bench pin I use when doing saw work.  Also showing is the tray I constructed to collect the sterling saw dust.  Over a period of time this adds up and when one has enough it can be traded in for more new sterling………



And a gross of #0000 saw blades that I use for cutting.  These are pretty small blades only being .009” wide and .024” in depth…..

They can snap really easily when one is not paying attention to saw frame position.  It is important to keep the saw blade perpendicular to the material being sawed.



The 1st video of cutting the upper brass mane out.  Since this is such a small piece to cut I put the pattern on a larger piece than necessary so I could hold it down while cutting.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VvzL0rd_q24&feature=youtu.be

The 2nd video is a close-up to show sawing technique…………

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zRNzmrWddMo&feature=youtu.be

The 3rd video........Ditto..............

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUkiPHbl7rg&feature=youtu.be

8.   Soak the piece in water to remove the patterns…………warm water works faster.

Now starts the soldering of pieces together and re-cutting the excess away.  I always start with the top piece of the project soldered to the next lower piece.

For clean soldering I will flux and pre-solder the upper piece(s).  This eliminates any possibility of solder spreading out from the edges leaving spewage looking solder on the piece.  Also, be careful not to add too much solder…..A little goes a long way when it flows.

IMPROTANT NOTE:  When soldering sterling and brass together I suggest not using hard solder.  I use easy (65%) or super easy (56%) for this type of soldering.  The reason for this is that sterling can get absorbed into the brass without melting at temps around or above hard solder flow temps.  I’ve had this happen to me!

The 1st to get soldered is the brass top mane to the sterling top body.  I usually cut small snippets to do this type of soldering.  Over soldering can be easily done if one just puts the whole wire solder onto the piece to melt – I’ve done it……………Place the soldered piece in position on the fluxed body and melt the solder.

It’s good to keep your pick or tweezers close just in case the top piece moves a bit.   Sometimes when the flux is heated it will cause the top piece to move a little…

Soldering Photo Sequence…

All cut pieces................


Fluxed w/solder snippet……..


Melted solder snippet.............


In place for soldering..............


Soldered................


Into the pickle to clean the piece before trimming excess..............

Trimming excess from mane......................

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TEZ0m5jlLqA&feature=youtu.be

All the remaining layers are soldered and trimmed as the 1st one was. 

Prepped for final soldering…



Bottom layer trimming...................

I didn’t get the whole video because my 4meg chip will only film so much.  It took me longer to cut it out……….Sorry, but at least you can see my methods.



Now that it is soldered and cleaned the only things to do is:

1.   Scribe the hooves, nose and pieces of hair for detail before soldering the findings because a flat surface works better for this. For this I used a sharp X-Acto knife blade and a nail set for the nose.
2.   Decide how to present it as a pin, pendant, earring or what-ever.
3.   Solder the appropriate findings on.
4.   And polish out..................





You’ll notice the tail is not connected in the 'pre-finished' & 'finished' photos - I used another finished piece for the above photos because I’m going to make another one facing in the opposite direction for a pair of earrings. To do this just cut the pieces out the same ways, but when soldering turn them up side down to reverse their direction.

Good Luck and have yourselves some fun……………


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« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2013, 01:31:32 pm »

Waiting with bated breath...
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Nancie
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« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2013, 03:58:55 pm »

Awesome show and tell Steve, you are very patient doing all that hand sawing, same could be said for some of us carvers, have you ever tried a ring saw for this work ?, my new gryphon will cut all non ferrous metals and composites, carbon fiber, fibreglass, in any direction, 1.4 dia blade, much bigger than your hand saw blade, just a thought, cuts internals awesome, it eats nephrite jade and agate. great skills in your work, hope to see more.

Cheers mick B
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Steve
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« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2013, 04:16:19 pm »

have you ever tried a ring saw for this work ?, my new gryphon will cut all non ferrous metals and composites, carbon fiber, fibreglass, in any direction, 1.4 dia blade, much bigger than your hand saw blade, just a thought, cuts internals awesome, it eats nephrite jade and agate.

Cheers mick B

A ring saw would take another whole set of skills and it's also on the thick side.  Not a bad idea for stone though......
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helens
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« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2013, 04:38:29 pm »

Wow Steve!!! Your tutorial didn't help me make any metal, what it did was made me realize how much work you put into things:). Very neat, very impressive!!!
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« Reply #8 on: April 07, 2013, 09:54:35 pm »

I didn't see this post, probably because I was in Quartzsite at the time... but I think it deserves to be sticky.
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« Reply #9 on: April 08, 2013, 12:45:20 am »

Thank you Steve....these is a great tutorial yippie yippie yippie
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« Reply #10 on: April 08, 2013, 12:53:55 am »

Look so easy to saw a silver sheet, i know its not that easy if we don't used to..... yes
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« Reply #11 on: June 07, 2013, 10:46:07 pm »

Gorgeous tutorial Steve....and truly lovely piece.  You must be very proud of it!!!
Congrats and thanks so much for the wonderful step-by-step info and fabulous photos in the tutorial.
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Carol M
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