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June 16, 2019, 03:52:37 pm
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Gluing to Wood

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Author Topic: Gluing to Wood  (Read 830 times)
Mary Ann
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« on: May 19, 2011, 10:07:38 am »

I found a tutorial on the website stonageindustries that addressed gluing small rocks and end cuts to wood. I've read a lot about gluing on the ends of 2 x 4's (for example) but when I read through these it could also be interpreted that the stone is glued on top of a board and the stone and board are both fed though the saw. If that is the case, wouldn't the wood gum up the blade?

This sentence is the one that had me thinking that it is glued on top:
 
I usually leave a little of the stone's slabbed surface sticking out so I can line the rock up correctly

http://stoneageindustries.com/gluing_stones_on_blocks_of_wood.html[/url]

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spirit bear beads
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« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2011, 10:41:25 am »

Mary Ann,  I'm no expert, but you don't saw the wood...   The 2x4 is in the clamp and the rock sticks out past the end of the clamp and into the path of the blade to be sawn....  I will try to get a picture for you unless someone else posts one first!
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john likes rocks!
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« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2011, 02:05:34 pm »

 I doubt a diamond saw could cut wood ... but a wood-chuck.... well...

I think they might be describing how to line up a rock that already has a cut, so the last slab won't be beveled.
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Mary Ann
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« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2011, 02:14:17 pm »

I doubt a diamond saw could cut wood ... but a wood-chuck.... well...

I should know this. headbang118  Obviously my brain took a vacation. The way it was worded (leaving a little bit of the slabbed surface sticking out) had me stumped. I'm used to lining up the cut edge of a previously slabbed rock, but sticking out had me thinking he meant it differently.

Thanks to both of you for clearing my brain fog!
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hulagrub
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« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2011, 05:31:38 pm »

Nancie (fatsister) told me to try gorilla glue, and it works great. Hope these pix help. You put the glue on the 2x4 and set the rock on top and it has enough weight to afix it to the wood. You use a screwdriver and a hammer to lightly separate the end cut from the wood.




The last is a Madagascar ready for the saw.

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« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2011, 05:36:15 pm »

BTW, the oily 2x4, makes great kindling. Only use it once.
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« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2011, 05:36:47 pm »

I doubt a diamond saw could cut wood ... but a wood-chuck.... well...



 saved2

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« Reply #7 on: May 19, 2011, 07:40:16 pm »

Mary Ann, I do this a lot....you get to cut every bit of your stone and it is quite secure when you tighted down on the 2 X 4...
Dave has it down pat...just follow his lead.

TOG
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« Reply #8 on: May 19, 2011, 11:54:52 pm »

Dave,

I recently tried using Gorilla Glue. I checked it the following day and I was able to pull the stone off with just my hand. What am I doing wrong?
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Mary Ann
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« Reply #9 on: May 20, 2011, 08:00:48 am »

Thank you everyone! The pictures are great, visuals are always very helpful. Thank you.

It looks like the ends that are glued are somewhat small. How large a piece can this method be used on?

Also, back to my original question, at least some version of it. I am wondering if it's possible that leftover strips of various sizes of tiles with their surfaces roughed would work as a base that the stone would sit on. That way both the rock and the tile would be fed through at the same time. If the tile piece is wider than the rock it sits on and hits the blade first, then the amount of pressure on the rock at any given point would not be as great as if the rock was glued to the end and hanging out there. There would also be no vertical pressure on the glue joint.
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hulagrub
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« Reply #10 on: May 20, 2011, 08:04:39 am »

Mary Ann, guess I don't get the picture with your last question. This is pretty simple and straight forward.
Christopher, Let it set another day, did you get as much surace area as possible between the rock and 2x4?
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spirit bear beads
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« Reply #11 on: May 20, 2011, 01:19:51 pm »

Gorilla glue.... dampen the wood slightly also...  I let mine set up at least a week.
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Mary Ann
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« Reply #12 on: May 20, 2011, 01:32:07 pm »

Mary Ann, guess I don't get the picture with your last question. This is pretty simple and straight forward.

I meant to have the stone sitting on top of the tile (vs sitting at the end of a piece of wood) as it is fed through the saw. The portion of tile that the rock is not on, would be what is clamped in the vise. I felt if there was any pressure exerted on the rock from the process of running through the blade, the stress on the glue joint would be less this way and the stone might be less likely to pop off and damage a blade. Granted, you would lose some of the material next to the tile  because of the glue, unless you used the Elmer's or waterglass.
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hulagrub
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« Reply #13 on: May 20, 2011, 05:07:24 pm »

Mary Ann, I have also used Elmers, but clamped the rock to the wood. I jerk on the rocks really good before clamping the whole rig in the vise, if they don't come off then, I have no problems.
Big ones or little ones, the whole idea is to maximize the number of slabs you can get from the rough.
Also, a diamond blade, easily cuts the wood, with no bad leftover results.
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« Reply #14 on: May 20, 2011, 05:56:03 pm »


The last rock I clamped to wood I used super glue, the medium density stuff.  It held real good but I thought It was a little expensive to use...maybe not....I need to figure this out.

TOG
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-Gary

Of all the things I've lost..I miss my mind the most.

Whether you think you can, or you think you can't, you're probably right.


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