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The Art of Gem Carving (Video)

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lonelygems
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« Reply #225 on: September 29, 2012, 07:08:45 am »

LOL..... saved1
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Daniel
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« Reply #226 on: October 01, 2012, 11:52:13 am »

Is there such an animal as 'vitrified bond diamond' as opposed to 'vitrified bon silicon carbide' for example?

I got to thinking on Debbie's recipe for making little grinding wheels (using epoxy as the hardener, felt as the substrate/structure/matrix, and fumed silica as a thickener and carrier) and this idea hit me - could you just take fumed silica and diamond, mold it into cakes and bake it to a slightly vitreous state and get little diamond grinding wheels? Anymore ever try anything like this?
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lonelygems
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« Reply #227 on: October 01, 2012, 12:48:57 pm »

There is vitrified diamond bur on tungsten.....but i'm not sure it can be use for lapidary works. I have 1 diamond bit which is looks like vitrified type in metal....this the only one i have, it is very interesting because its shape will change following carving surface, i'll post a picture tomorrow.

I never use resin bond diamond tools but i got the idea how its works....i think it is perfect for sanding or polishing step but not for roughing or grinding. Fumed sillica will make the resin/epoxy harder so it will last little long time then just diamond powder with resin.
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« Reply #228 on: October 01, 2012, 12:53:52 pm »

I need to try resin bond - sounds like a good idea but I hear a lot of people don't like them. I wonder if they are using them properly? dunno I would think they would be awesome for pre-polish but not much else dunno dunno dunno dunno dunno
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« Reply #229 on: October 01, 2012, 08:53:08 pm »

Yep, Flame Jasper is very hard to come by. I still got a small piece from a seller in Mississippi and I'm told that there is virtually nothing left by now. Cut one (need to redo the sanding/polish as at the time I had no clue what I was up to) LOL


Will keep the rest until some really special occasion comes up.
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« Reply #230 on: October 02, 2012, 01:27:13 am »

Ya that sure does look like the same material. Very easy to work and takes a wonderful shine! Thanks for dredging up the name of that stuff Kurt - now if I can find the names of about 500 other rocks I have that I'm clueless about...
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« Reply #231 on: October 02, 2012, 01:57:09 am »

Actually it was sold to me under "Imperial Mexican Flame Jasper" mined in the fifties and only very little found at one single time and place.
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« Reply #232 on: October 02, 2012, 03:31:45 am »

This jasper look so hard and also can take a very good polishing, and it has a nice patern and colours...
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Daniel
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« Reply #233 on: October 02, 2012, 10:54:29 am »

It takes a really good polish but I don't think it's a porcelain jasper - nowhere near as hard to work as bruneau or sci-fi jasper. Mine had zero fractures in it. Too bad it's so hard to get now or I would buy more. I got lucky and found it for ... I think $4.50/lb (or $3.50 - been awhile since I've been to that place - I think I got all of their good old stock except for whole agates - hmmm... thinking13)
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« Reply #234 on: December 09, 2012, 11:07:12 am »

Easy Combination Cutting by Marco Voltolini

Tutorial on cutting bubbles (aka lenses). Applications mentioned as well are hemicylindrical-like grooves and 'V's.

Pete is quite good with the first technique and created one of the most amazing pieces I have seen in my life using it:

Carved Fluorite Pendant

I believe Pete extends on the technique by using various sizes of ball burrs and dowels for different sized lenses. This goes to show that anytime you say, "I just learned a new technique, but it's somewhat limited." you might want to consider dropping the comma and everything after it and re-applying your words.

Here was my first try with this. I used a 400 grit ball burr and nothing but 14K diamond paste on a dressed bamboo skewer - *poof!* - maybe I got lucky...


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« Reply #235 on: December 09, 2012, 11:57:21 am »

Hi frank....., ball diamond bur is very usefull for carving, i use them quite aften.....0,75mm to 8 mm, mostly for small details 0,75 to 2 mm. They'easier to handle/drive on small curve lines....

You did good polished that half bubble yes......small surface isn't need sand paper, stright to apply a diamond paste/powder on bamboo or wood and for better shine continue with a soft cotton...
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Daniel
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« Reply #236 on: December 09, 2012, 12:47:53 pm »

Thanks Daniel, yes I have been using ball and football burrs a lot lately. I found that if I apply lite pressure at slow speed and move in circles with a large ball it removes material and keeps a very flat surface!

Hoping all is well on the pacific rim where you sure do have a lot of copper in your rocks! yippie
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« Reply #237 on: October 17, 2015, 08:16:53 pm »

Does anybody know where to get these types of burs or what they're called? I can't seem to find them anywhere and I've been looking for hours online. I have the diamond dust, but I have no clue where to find these copper tipped burs.
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« Reply #238 on: October 17, 2015, 08:40:22 pm »

Sam:

See my response on your other post.

Debbie K
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