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February 22, 2019, 02:18:10 pm
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Reclaiming Cutting Oil~ What Works Best for You?

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Author Topic: Reclaiming Cutting Oil~ What Works Best for You?  (Read 1241 times)
MrsWTownsend
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« on: April 14, 2011, 02:23:55 pm »

I have been looking through the forum and online for methods of reclaiming cutting oil that has been removed from the saw trough.  So far I have found 2 methods; hulagrub made a comment in a thread about using his wife's terry cloth towel and I found a page last night that told how to use a paper bag and drain into a 5 gallon bucket.  I will search that up again and link it:

http://rocktumblers.blogspot.com/2007/09/how-to-recycle-cutting-oil-in-your-rock.html

Do they even make paper bags for the grocery store any more?

I am interested in learning how/what you all find works best for you.
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mirkaba
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« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2011, 03:09:27 pm »

I can't get paper bags at the grocery. Found some at the dollar store. Got a big box full of old style vacuum cleaner bags at the thrift store. They work really well but take a long time to filter.
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« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2011, 03:14:17 pm »

Has anyone tried using perhaps a restaurant grade coffee filter?  That may work OK for a drain style oil filter.   dunno  You could use a small plastic bucket ( 2 - 2 1/2 gal)with holes drilled in the bottom of it and set that on top of your 5 gallon bucket.  Just a thought.
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deb193
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« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2011, 03:42:41 pm »

I still get grocery bags when requested, and over a few weeks it drains very well. You do need to support the bag in one bucket, and have it room to drain down into another. Double bagging might be advised. Done this for several years now.

Decades ago, in high school, I worked for KFC, and we filtered cooking oil through an apparatus that used a coffee-like filter on a mesh screen - but the oil got sucked through with the force of a pump. No clue how coffee filters would work in a gravity system.

Best of luck.
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« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2011, 04:29:48 pm »

5 gallon bucket with the bottom cut out. Go to a paint store and buy a paint screen. Paint screen fits a 5 gallon bucket perfectly. Six small clamps holding the screen in place for extra support. This works best if you have a 50 gallon oil container to use as a reservoir for the recyled oil. Any mechanic shop or Ski resort...lol  you can pick up an empty 50 gallon container.

Jason
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hulagrub
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« Reply #5 on: April 14, 2011, 05:53:22 pm »

A handi-wipe in the bottom of a bucket, that has some holes drilled in it works good. Let gravity do it's job. Support it so it will drain into another bucket.
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« Reply #6 on: April 14, 2011, 06:40:09 pm »

I use old pillow cases.  I put one inside a 5 gallon bucket and use a plastic container to scrape "mud" out of the bottom of the saw.  When the bucket is about 1/2 full I hang the pilllow case up on a chain pulled up to the top of the bucket.  I let it sit that way for weeks and then pull it out and put it and the now "clay" in it into a plastic trash bag and in with the trash.  I get about a gallon of clean oil back for reuse.  I get the pillow cases for 50 cents at the local Goodwill store.
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« Reply #7 on: April 14, 2011, 10:15:45 pm »

Most  grocery stores will put your items in a paper bag if you request it. I use two bags, one inside the other in a 5 gallon plastic bucket with some 1" holes drilled in the bottom. I take a plastic bucket lid and drill similar holes in it and put it on another 5 gallon plastic bucket. The first bucket sits on the perforated lid on the bottom bucket. It takes about four weeks to fully filter through the bags. I change oil about every two months so everything works out well. I get about a 85% return of filtered oil.
I have fun with the grocery store baggers. When they ask me "paper or plastic" I sometimes say it doesn't matter because I'm bisacksual.
Bob
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christopherl1234
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« Reply #8 on: April 14, 2011, 10:58:44 pm »

Bob,

Why two bags. Did using one bag leave the oil cloudy?
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« Reply #9 on: April 15, 2011, 12:40:51 am »


I have just about exactly the same set up that Bob does.  I was setting the bucket with the grocery bags in it on top of a coffee can in the second bucket but I am going to switch to the lid with holes in it instead.  Works very good.

I double bag as soon as the oil has gone thru once, then send it thru both bags again.  Safeway will just hand be a big handful if I ask. 

TOG
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« Reply #10 on: April 15, 2011, 08:32:07 am »

Seems to me that a continuous filtering system would be the way to go.  Would take a larger volume of oil initially.  And perhaps some sort of pump,  surely one of you clever engineers can come up with that? hide
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Rocksnot
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« Reply #11 on: April 15, 2011, 09:51:47 am »

Hmmmm...
I'm thinking something like a pump and pre-filter to get oil out of tub and into filter container then a shop vac to pull the oil through the filter (pillow case? reuseable?) into the clean oil container.

Although a centrifugal (spinning) separator might be more exciting!
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Steve
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« Reply #12 on: April 15, 2011, 10:12:44 am »

I'm not familiar with oil saws (mine is a water trim saw), but does the cutting sediment settle to the bottom and accumulate when the saw is not in use as it does in water? 

If so I would think that a system where the oil is run thru a gallon paint can with holes in the top to let the oil drain out into a 5-gallon bucket would allow the sediment to accumulate on the bottoms of both containers during a oil cycling period after sawing.

I use a system like that for my expandable drum while I'm polishing.  A swamp cooler pump sends the water up to the drum then it drains into a paint can then into the 5-gallon bucket, then pumped back to the drum.  Here's a photo of my water set up before I added the paint can..................

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« Reply #13 on: April 15, 2011, 02:34:04 pm »

I have a 55 gal drum with a hole cut in the top that a 5 gal  bucket sits in.
The 5 gal bucket has about 30 1/2" holes drilled in it all around the sides and on the bottom.
I only use 1 paper bag because I figure I only want to lose one bag's worth of oil as the oil will permeate the paper bag completely and you will not get it back. It takes 2-4 weeks for it to completely drain, then I throw the bag of guck in the trash and replace the bag.
My local grocery store will give me paper sacks if I ask for them.
I have a hand pump in the drum so when I need more oil I just pump out what I need from the drum.
 
I think a compression method would be the best, but I have not had time to work on one yet, so much to do, so little time.

Tony
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MrsWTownsend
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« Reply #14 on: April 15, 2011, 05:40:09 pm »

Seems to me that a continuous filtering system would be the way to go.  Would take a larger volume of oil initially.  And perhaps some sort of pump,  surely one of you clever engineers can come up with that? hide

Seems like with a continuous filter it would get clogged up fast and repeatedly~ cutting sludge is a thick and gooey mess!!!

Hmmmm...
I'm thinking something like a pump and pre-filter to get oil out of tub and into filter container then a shop vac to pull the oil through the filter (pillow case? reuseable?) into the clean oil container.

Although a centrifugal (spinning) separator might be more exciting!

  Always thinking!  I will be interested in seeing a video of the centrifugal oil separator. 
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hulagrub
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« Reply #15 on: April 15, 2011, 08:25:22 pm »

Remember the scientific experiment we did by hanging a shoe from a can of to the bulb ofa thermometer to get the dew point? Have thought that could work. Used to be able to buy reclaimed motor oil from a system like that.
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Rocksnot
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« Reply #16 on: April 18, 2011, 11:09:05 am »

As requested  video!

The secret of how the simple centrifuge works - pretty good demo of how it works


Simple centrifuge cleaning waste oil - showing gakey oil being filtered


Self Cleaning Centrifuge  (ready made in Australia if ya have money lol)
(this video is kind a loud :/ )


I have seen some industrial centrifuges do 1000 gal per hour but that would be a bit large (and pricey) for most of our needs
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deb193
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« Reply #17 on: April 18, 2011, 01:57:16 pm »

This might work for the light cloud of rock particles that get through the paper bag, but the thickness of the rock sludge that enters the bag originally would be incompatible with features like the draining that happens when the unit is turned off. Although if the sludge largely filled the drum, then there would not be much unclean oil to drain.

the design also seems to favor continuous cleaning instead of a batch of rock oil pudding.

I think the idea of gravity instead of vacuum is interesting. I wonder about spinning the paper bag to dramatically shorten the time it takes to filter the oil?
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Rocksnot
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« Reply #18 on: April 18, 2011, 02:59:31 pm »

@deb - "batch of rock oil pudding"  *belly laugh*  kind of like desert after having some rock snot soup? :D

From the discussions I did not think any self draining feature would be very workable, unless the oil was being constantly cycled through to keep it from becoming 'pudding'.

But the one video of the Australian made machine was pumping out the 'waste' product like cookie dough, but that machine probably costs more than the saw?!
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MrsWTownsend
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« Reply #19 on: April 18, 2011, 06:01:31 pm »

Wow that video is awesome~ I was envisioning a splatterific mess...  The first one with the drawn out design is very useful!
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« Reply #20 on: April 18, 2011, 08:01:47 pm »

I found that a grizzly used for panning for gold works great over a 5 gal bucket. I have noticed that thicker oil takes longer to filter through the paper bag which I put in the grizzly on the bucket. I also found that if you take the time to let the sludge set, the oil will come to the top so that every once in a while you can poor off the top pure oil. then only when the sludge has less oil do I use the paper bag.
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« Reply #21 on: April 23, 2011, 06:58:57 pm »

I use the paper bag method and generally get about 60%/80% recovered but I let it drain for 4/6 weeks.
I don't have a 55gal drum like Tony has but larger than Bob's setup. I use only one bag and it does super.

Don
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« Reply #22 on: April 24, 2011, 07:34:13 am »


I went back to one bag only also.  Two bags didn't seem to make a difference except to soak into the bag and render a little less oil recovered. (as Tony pointed out)

TOG
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-Gary

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Whether you think you can, or you think you can't, you're probably right.


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