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Lapidary / Gemstone Community Forum
December 11, 2018, 06:40:04 pm
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Bezel help please

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Author Topic: Bezel help please  (Read 4272 times)
Goldsmithy
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« Reply #15 on: November 02, 2013, 05:29:30 pm »

As far as polishing goes, I pre polish everything unset. I then set the stone and do a final polish of the bezel. I make my own fine silver bezel wire so that I can make the size for the piece I need. When I had my retail studio and production time became a problem, I bought what I needed from refiners.

I am just getting back into working silver, but 35+ years ago I used a polished 'fender washer' (which is a large thick washer) and a light hammer to 'pound' the bezel down. A very light touch is needed, it just takes a little practice of moving the washer (which is held on end) as you tap. 
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Carol M
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« Reply #16 on: November 02, 2013, 06:35:08 pm »

This youtube free video series is excellent to understand how to set a bezel around a stone.
In this one she's setting the bezel around the stone but there are 3 parts.  Go forward or back as you like.  I hope this helps.
Check it out. 
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Ciao,
Carol M
"Pursue Your Passions....."
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"Mistakes are simply a form of practice!"
"People who never make mistakes.....probably never do anything!"

1dave
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« Reply #17 on: December 06, 2013, 10:15:44 am »


I use a home made rocker from 1 1/4" x 1/4' iron.
Cut one end on an angle and you can have four different curves to work with.

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Mlou
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« Reply #18 on: February 12, 2014, 05:56:13 pm »

I use a bezel rocker to get the bezel in upon the stone, a burnisher to push the top millimeter or so even tighter, and the tip of the burnisher (on hard stones) to push and burnish and smooth the very top edge of the bezel. Then a 1" rubber Pumice wheel in the flex shaft can remove any stray marks or dents left from the work. Then it's ready to polish with tripoli and rouge. Putting a knife edge on the pumice wheel by running it on a file will make a handy tool to get into the crevice between the backing plate and the bezel, for a very sleek look in that area. I almost always use fine silver for bezels.
 - M'lou, a jeweler since 1971
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SilverStone Jewelry
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« Reply #19 on: April 07, 2015, 05:49:53 pm »

Great tips above.  I use a rocker that I love and an agate burnisher at the very end just to give the edge some shine.  I have used a dowel in the past especilly when working with a softer stone.  I have also toothed the top edge of the bezel with a gravers file when using a more plain solid colored stone, I find it gives the setting a little more interested.  Learned this technique from an old Native American jewelry making book I found.  The teeth are very fine.  this works great when all you have is sterling as it makes the top of hte bezel more pliable.
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hulagrub
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« Reply #20 on: April 07, 2015, 08:12:12 pm »

Well SilverStone, could you show what you mean by toothed? Is this like a serrated bezel?
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Dave, a certified Rockaholic

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« Reply #21 on: April 08, 2015, 06:13:51 am »

Yes serrated
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55fossil
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« Reply #22 on: May 15, 2015, 09:04:01 am »

    I saw that someone said they use dowels. I use old maple flooring which I cut into pushers. You can shape them to the height and angle you want for any job. The longer you use the wooden pusher the better it gets. The wood actually seems to become harder. Plus you never seem to scratch a stone or bezel when you go ^*%$%#$ as it slips. The really hard wood can actually develop heat as you do the sharp corners and it almost seems to weld the silver as it folds over itself above the girdle line. The picture is of my large pusher used in an article for Lapidary Journal this year.....


* a 10-14-2013 010.JPG (1958.13 KB, 3456x2304 - viewed 7 times.)
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GregHiller
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« Reply #23 on: May 15, 2015, 09:43:50 am »

I also use wood for a bezel rocker.  I damaged a few stones with a metal burnisher and now I almost never use it.  I use what I think they'd call tongue depressors.  They are available at craft stores for really low $.  I usually glue two of them together for added strength. 
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rocks2dust
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« Reply #24 on: May 15, 2015, 11:36:00 am »

Another thing that works are the wooden things that potters use for carving and burnishing clay. Also available at craft stores and they come in different shapes. I like the ones that curve at the end, but come to a point, which is handy to get into corners. I don't know what kind of wood they are, but it is very hard, take pressure well and are long-lasting (some I'm still using I got several decades ago).
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Carol M
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« Reply #25 on: May 15, 2015, 11:48:39 am »

Hi,
Years ago, after putting a noticeable scratch across a chrysocolla cab, bricks

I heard about using very smooth Agate Burnishing Tool.  I had no lapidary equipment at that time and so I bought them on Ebay.  The ones they sell now have a handle with a piece of agate in the end, but mine were just 2 longish pieces of agate, and because the whole thing is agate, some parts are more pointy and the other end is more rounded.
They come in all sorts of shapes, but you could easily make your own in whatever shapes you like. yes

Here's what's currently available on EBay, but when I bought them I think I got 2 for about $5 [for both].
http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=p2053587.m570.l2632.R2.TR3.TRC2.A0.H0.Xagate+burni.TRS0&_nkw=agate+burnisher&_sacat=631
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Ciao,
Carol M
"Pursue Your Passions....."
"Imagine the Possibilities!"
"Mistakes are simply a form of practice!"
"People who never make mistakes.....probably never do anything!"

orrum
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« Reply #26 on: May 16, 2015, 10:48:43 am »

Bobby1 I have seen your awesome cabs both huge and regular posted and was flabbergasted!  Now I see your Silversmithing and am equally impressed! Bob you ROCK!!!
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