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Back from William Holland - Stone and Silver in Intarsias

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Author Topic: Back from William Holland - Stone and Silver in Intarsias  (Read 1083 times)
theimage1
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« on: September 01, 2010, 07:23:26 pm »

Got back late Saturday from teaching at William Holland and met Scott from Bitter Brook Cabochons. He took my photo class. Anyway remembered on SUnday that my wife's birthday was next Sunday so decided to get to work and make her something.

Monday I made up a special design for her to wear at her bible study group, but missed the cross by a bit and was only marginally happy with it. So went back to the drawing board a cut a second stone later that I liked better. Dug out my silver stuff and made them both in to pendants on Tuesday and finally got around to photographing them tonight while she is away at another meeting.

1.) didn't like the way the cab turned out ... but what the heck made it up anyway


2.) prefered this cab design and finished it too.


Now to make up a club newsletter and get finished up to return to William Holland end of next week for two more teaching classes and I'll take one on stone setting.
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ScarlettoSara
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« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2010, 07:30:11 pm »

Howdee Mister Ron:)
Sounds like you had a pretty good time with your class. I bet your students went home all fired up.
I love both of these designs but the second one pops out more. maybe because of the more detailed framing? Interesting how the same materials in basically same space look entirely different with just a little tweeking:)
Mrs. G will be happy I am sure:)
You are very busy man but dont forget to slow down and smell the rocks. Something like that:)
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« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2010, 08:01:03 pm »

Howdy, howdy Ron !

Very nice pendants and both the intarsias look great ..  I actuallyl like the top one a bit more .
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theimage1
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« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2010, 09:02:06 pm »

A couple of interesting observations on making these stones.

The Silver - Stone glue joints are REALLY weak. I used the same 5 minute Epoxy that I normally use for intarsia and the joints where the silver contacts the stone are EXTREMELY weak after set up. Any pressure along the joint is sufficient to break it. In the first (top) row of images, the longer joint broke easily when trimming up the ends or lapping the ends flat.




In the second row (bottom) of the first image, the very small silver to stone joint would give way when trimming on the saw almost every time. Really not enough surface area to hold well. (Yet a row of small flat stones glued end to end provide plenty of strength to work ... see image below (me playing around!)  ... and it was epoxied onto an aluminum rod for me to hold and it worked just fine.





I tried roughing up the silver by sanding and filing before applying the glue and still found little to no effect. Once I got two stone joints (stone to stone) around the silver seam it seemed to be fine and strong enough. In row one of first image I put on a thin jade backing and all was fine. In the second row I added once piece of frame at the same time I made the thin joint, and all held together fairly well.

I had done this was argentum silver once with bad results and thought maybe it was the argentum silver. I have no done it with fine silver and sterling silver and all appear to create weak joints.

Just a few observations to watch out for if you are trying the same.
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Bluesssman
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« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2010, 09:22:41 pm »

Fantastic work Ron!!!! I agree with George, I like the first one better also...


Gary
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bobby1
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« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2010, 09:28:45 pm »

I have also made some cabs with either silver or brass between the pieces and they just don't hold without a backing. Roughing the metal surfaces just postponed when the joint would separate.
Bob
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thewrightthings
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« Reply #6 on: September 01, 2010, 09:28:55 pm »

Ron, what great pendants.  I'm voting(not that we are actually voting) for the second one for two reasons.  First is the framing of the cross, but more importantly, esthetically it is more pleasing as the lines of the piece are more consistent, all being at right angles, not a mix of ovals and rectangles....at least that's my logic.
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« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2010, 05:30:32 pm »

The pattern of the blue stone in the first is more interesting and the cross is more interesting in the second, both are excellent.
Maybe five minuet epoxy isn't the best choice for silver to stone. I have no suggestion for a better alternative but there must be one out there. I saw a blog by a fellow name Han Meevis on the Orchid forums and he faceted gold and other precious stones together. I'll see if I can find his blog about what kind of cement he used for that.
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instarsia
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« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2012, 02:25:56 pm »

Nice pendants, metal stone intarsia can be difficult . From my experience silver tends to break at the glue joint more than gold . I always take a file and make sure both the stone and metal is perfectly flat ( diamond file on the stone), I also make sure the glue is totally dry 12- 24 hours even on 5 min. epoxy, the problem i have come across is sometimes grinding down the stone/metal intarsia the metal has a tendency to smear into the crack and seperate the metal from the stone. I hope this helps.
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