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February 17, 2019, 12:35:31 pm
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slab blade warping and angle cuts

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Author Topic: slab blade warping and angle cuts  (Read 880 times)
Neural
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« on: June 09, 2010, 04:03:56 pm »

I'm a bit confused here.

First I noticed that the saw tends to not cut straight down.  As it progresses through the rock, it tends to slowly push away from the vice.

Second, when done cutting, the blade looks pretty badly warped.

Then I took the slab out of the oil, cleaned it off, and turned back around to inspect the blade damage, and...

...it was perfectly flat.

Thinking I was losing my mind, I tested this again, and the blade is *definitely warped when the machine is turned off after the slab falls, but within like a minute, the blade is perfect again.

Is this normal? o.O
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hulagrub
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« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2010, 04:56:28 pm »

Jon, on my LS12, if the bearings under the carriage are out of adjustment, they need to be tightened, so the carriage does not move.
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Neural
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« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2010, 05:13:53 pm »

I'll see if they are tight enough, but it's brand new bearings and shaft, so there shouldn't really be any play in them.

Any idea on the blade warping/unwarping?
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hulagrub
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« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2010, 05:18:38 pm »

It's the carriage moving. Mine had too much slack, right out of the box.
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« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2010, 06:16:31 pm »

Hulagrub's answer is the most likely cause, but it is also possible that the blade has been warped back and forth enough to tension the outside or skin of the blade while leaving the core soft.  This assumes that the warp you are observing is a cup shape.  If so, next time you observe the problem, don't remove the blade, just push on the side to which it is warped.  If it warps to the other sid, this is the case.  Get out your ball peen hammer and start experimenting.
Steve
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« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2010, 07:28:24 pm »

Neural,

Take one of the slabs you have cut and put it on a piece of glass.  It should be flat.  If it isn't your blade has cupped.   

Were you the guy who bent a blade and then strightened it with a piece of plywood and 2 by 4?  If yes, it may still be tweaked.

Some saws, mine included have way too much play in the vise carriage.   I tightened up all of the available adjustment screws and even shimmed one of the rods by hammering a small finish nail really thin and hammering it into a bearing area on one of the supports to tighten it.

I own a Covington 16 inch saw and since I tightened everything it does cut a lot straighter and faster.
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« Reply #6 on: June 09, 2010, 08:12:11 pm »


That was me Mike not Jon.  My blade is still good and straight after the 2X4 trick but my carriage is out of whack.  I have a Lortone 12 with a 14" blade in it.  The carriage tends to wobble around a lot.

TOG
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« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2010, 09:22:03 pm »

Something else I haven't seen anyone else mention is that the ways on which the carriage rides must be exactly parallel with the blade.        Is this not so, Little Grasshopper?
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« Reply #8 on: June 09, 2010, 10:37:23 pm »

gregorgr8 - Has a point if this is a new saw and the blade being pushed to the side by the carriage if it is not running straight.  Pretty easy to check though.  Move the empty carriage as close to the blade as possible.  Measure how close the front corner of the vise nearest the blade is to the side of the blade at the point it would first start to pass by the blade.  Push the carriage all the way to the rear and see if the measurement remains the same.

Don't worry if the front of the vice distance is a bit different that the rear part of the vice as they are bolted to the frame and could be a bit off in their slotting or bolt holes.  As long as the front part remains the same distance it is running straight.
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« Reply #9 on: June 09, 2010, 10:41:12 pm »

What kind of saw is it?

Tony
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Neural
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« Reply #10 on: June 10, 2010, 01:19:53 am »

yeah.. was just about to mention.  This isn't a carriage type saw.  Its a Lortone 14" drop saw. 

The blade and motor are on an arm that basically is balanced so the weight of the saw and arm are what provide the force to cut downward through the rock
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« Reply #11 on: June 10, 2010, 07:32:50 am »

.  Pretty easy to check though.  Move the empty carriage as close to the blade as possible. 

an easy way to do this is with a pencil. Put it on vise when it is as forward as it will go. have the pencil just touch the saw.  Push vise back and the pencil shoud stay equally on the saw as you push the vice back.   I just wanted to give this tip.

However,  as you said a drop saw is different, but perhaps the same principles apply and could be checked.  eg  the blade probably needs to be truly vertical - plumb as it is called.
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« Reply #12 on: June 10, 2010, 09:20:47 am »

Be sure to make the first bit of the cut very slowly to be sure the cut starts straight.....
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Neural
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« Reply #13 on: June 10, 2010, 11:26:44 am »

Well.  Everything looks solid on the arbor. 

Is it possible that one side of the blade edge is cutting faster than the other?
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« Reply #14 on: June 10, 2010, 02:41:02 pm »


The alignment check between your drop saw and a carriage saw is similar to the alignment check between a radial arm wood saw and a table saw (for wood).  The drop saw is going to be harder to align but that has to be the problem.

TOG
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