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Lapidary / Gemstone Community Forum
December 10, 2018, 08:16:29 am
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Soldering/flux question

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Author Topic: Soldering/flux question  (Read 1325 times)
Rockoteer
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« Reply #15 on: May 30, 2010, 10:06:17 am »


Thats what I have been doing but I thought there might be a quicker way.

TOG  needcoffee
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-Gary

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Whether you think you can, or you think you can't, you're probably right.
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« Reply #16 on: December 07, 2013, 08:48:17 am »

OK, ignorance is not always bliss.  I have ordered the chip silver, hard solder.  I also ordered a liquid flux.  I ordered from Rio Grande in case anyone is curious.  I am ASSUMING I am on the right track.  My efforts to date have been lots of melted wire, one singed beard (I am now beardless in self defence) and a few "OH DARNS" ( yea, right).  I have lugged around a small roll of silver solder that was used to attach carbide tips to steel blanks for about 25 years or so.  I assumed this was silver solder since that is what I was told it was.  I now suspect it is something other than what I need.  I have been using Borax mixed with water to form a paste which I apply lightly.  My torch is Mapp gas, self igniting head.  The question:  Have I been using the wrong solder and flux?  Thanks.

All my stuff was boxed up 30-40 years ago.
I just broke it out to start again, found all my solder, started with the hard solder and melted my sterling while the "hard solder" square never even rounded on the corners!
Turns out I have 7 packets of German Silver bezel labeled as hard solder.
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tetonartgallery
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« Reply #17 on: December 07, 2013, 09:50:41 am »

I have lugged around a small roll of silver solder that was used to attach carbide tips to steel blanks for about 25 years or so.

I have been told that solder that has sat around for over a year may not flow like newer solder.
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bobby1
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« Reply #18 on: December 07, 2013, 03:25:27 pm »

The problem with using silver solder from years past is that it contains Cadmium. Due to the hazardous nature of cadmium fumes generated while soldering OSHA has banned its use in silver solder. Cadmium fumes cause nerve damage when they are inhaled. I would suggest using new silver solder. I don't know of any way to determine if the old solder that someone has contains Cadmium (it was used to make the solder flow better) unless it has the original packaging which might show the ingredients.
Bob
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« Reply #19 on: December 07, 2013, 03:26:32 pm »

I have lugged around a small roll of silver solder that was used to attach carbide tips to steel blanks for about 25 years or so.

I have been told that solder that has sat around for over a year may not flow like newer solder.

If solder sits around long enough, there will be problems with the solder flowing because the solder has formed a layer of oxides, like tarnish on silver. This must be removed be removed by sanding lightly before the solder will flow properly. Once the oxides are removed, the solder will flow like when it was new.   ...Teddy
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mirkaba
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« Reply #20 on: December 08, 2013, 12:34:49 pm »

I have some solder that is several years old and have had no problem. I don't cut a bunch of pallions of solder in advance and keep a piece of steel wool handy on my soldering table to clean the solder up before I use it. Have not had any contamination problems with my pickle either.....
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« Reply #21 on: December 28, 2013, 04:55:17 pm »

How about handy flux that's gone kinda dry whats the fix for this ?


been looking for an answer on this one for awhile now.
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Steve
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« Reply #22 on: December 28, 2013, 06:12:31 pm »

How about handy flux that's gone kinda dry whats the fix for this ?


been looking for an answer on this one for awhile now.

I dilute mine with water when it dries out................Add water mix well and slop it on................Here in NM it dries out quite quickly because of the low humidity............and I leave the top off wen I'm burning silver...............
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Mlou
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« Reply #23 on: February 12, 2014, 06:12:40 pm »

I use boric acid in denatured alcohol as a firecoat, and liquid flux , one of the yellow or greenish yellow clear liquid fluxes right at the seam and on the bits of solder. Batterns or My-T-Flux, my current favorite. The boric acid keeps evaporating, and I have to add more to the container. I use no water in it. It makes a nice thin, frosty white film that melts well to protect the metal from oxygen.
-M'lou
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Goldsmithy
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« Reply #24 on: February 13, 2014, 06:57:44 am »

I think I have tried every kind of flux for slier in order to prevent the dreaded 'firescale" on the piece I was working on in silver. I have used Firescoff, alcohol/borax, Prip's flux, Cupronil, Batten's yellow flux, and a ouple of others.I now use a product called Stay-Silv. It comes in a white paste formula for soldering non-ferrous metalsand also a black flux for soldering ferrous metals. The white solder has a working temperature range of 800 to 1600 degrees F. The black flux has a working temperature of 800 to 1800 degrees F.

If the piece I am working on is larger than 1 inchish, I will first coat the piece with Prip's flux by coating the entire piece and gently warming to burn off the water and leave a protective coating over the entire piece. I then use the white paste flux (stay-Silv) at the joint I am soldering.

Unless you have a lot of money to waste, stay away from Fire-scoff. Prip's flux will do the same thing and you can make it yourself. I don't have the formula in front of me, but I can dig it out if anyone wants it.

Please do not use Stay-BRIGHT flux instead of Stay-Silv flux. Stay-Bright is used for low temperature soldering at 475 degrees and will not work for high temperature soldering.

In any soldering operations, everything must be clean, clean, clean. Bobby1's tip about using denatured alcohol ios "right on".
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