Lapidary / Gemstone Community Forum
May 31, 2020, 11:23:03 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
 
  Home Help Search Login Register  

labradorite at the beach?

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: labradorite at the beach?  (Read 417 times)
flynny84
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3


View Profile
« on: January 26, 2016, 05:57:44 am »

Hi everyone.
I live on the east coast of the UK and after a trip to the beach last weekend, whilst looking for seaglass (I'm that kind of person) I came across a few rocks lying on the sand. Two the size of 2p/quarter and one the size of my palm, with blue flashes of iridescence from within them. I have a piece of polished labradorite at home and that's what I immediately suspected they were. I even gave one of them a tickle with the dremel just to see if I could improve the effect.
Can anyone else confirm my finding as labradorite/Spectrolite? I had always thought of these rocks to be mined. Of if not, any thought on what they could be?


* DSCF7492b.jpg (193.36 KB, 600x458 - viewed 7 times.)

* DSCF7493b.jpg (186.11 KB, 535x456 - viewed 5 times.)

* DSCF7494b.jpg (242.72 KB, 600x509 - viewed 3 times.)
Report Spam   Logged

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter

Alvin
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1750


View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2016, 06:03:36 am »

nice find no matter what they end up being. ocean tides is like mining on a large scale with all the erosion of the shore
Report Spam   Logged

55fossil
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 269


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2016, 08:56:57 am »

Well, way cool find and so pretty. ???  Is the rock solid or will t flake off. I have seen mica and other feldspars flash in the sun. If the rock wants to come apart in layers and little flakes that will help identify it. I hope yours is solid.
Report Spam   Logged

lithicbeads
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4927


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2016, 07:48:34 pm »

Geologists call the stuff anorthosite and it is not as rare as you may think in metamorphic environments but the pieces are typically modest in size . Nice find.





Report Spam   Logged

BruceB
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 5


Bruce Baur


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2016, 11:27:04 pm »

It would almost have to be Larvakite
Report Spam   Logged
Former sealdaddy
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 214


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2016, 09:29:38 am »

It most likely migrated from near Norway.
Report Spam   Logged


Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum

Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy