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April 20, 2019, 02:11:40 pm
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Gloves - Looking For Rubber or Vinyl that are Skin Tight

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Author Topic: Gloves - Looking For Rubber or Vinyl that are Skin Tight  (Read 473 times)
James D. Farrow
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« on: October 26, 2015, 03:01:05 pm »

Well I took a good chunk out of my thumb nail (only a bit of my thumb
was bleeding though) on my diamond disc so am looking for gloves.

I have a pair of work gloves but they are to bulky to fiddle with cabs
delicately.

I searched and they have Disposable, Touch Pad, Driving, Dress, etc... but they
all seem to be to thin or to thick.

The disposable ones would fit right but not really going to make any
difference when catching a nail or finger on the disc.

They have rubber cleaning gloves but they fit to loosely.

Anyone know of any skin tight gloves that are a thicker rubber or vinyl?

Thanks,

James
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James D. Farrow
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« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2015, 04:21:17 pm »


 There is a glove made for filleting fish that protects your hand from knife cuts if you Don't mind getting them wet.They are sold at sporting goods stores,sort of a metallic mesh and not too bulky.     
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James D. Farrow
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« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2015, 04:40:28 pm »

Thanks!

I have seen those on Amazon but they don't look like they fit tight enough.

I don't care about them getting wet.

James
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James D. Farrow
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« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2015, 05:26:09 pm »

I go to a auto-parts store and get "Derma-Lite' nitrile gloves that mechanics use when working.  They're lightly powered and fit quite snugly.  I believe they come in different sized and each will fit either hand.
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James D. Farrow
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« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2015, 05:53:29 pm »

Thanks!

I will check them out.

James
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James D. Farrow
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« Reply #5 on: November 01, 2015, 05:25:56 am »

Had a look but no luck. The thin (usually disposable) gloves are of no use as they will not last long.

Maybe I should explain better.

When I use my flat lap I like to hold the stone in my fingertips to maneuver it around to grind/polish it.

I find I can , this may sound odd, sense where it needs to be positioned to grind or polish it the right way.
Like feeling through the stone.

Anyway, without realizing it I was also grinding away finger nails. Never felt it until I saw blood. LOL!

Wore a good chunk out of my thumbnail and then the skin. 2 other fingernails not as much.

So I need some sort of finger protection. Maybe a rubber glove. But want skin tight. But grinding resistant.

Regular gloves are to bulky, disposable ones to thin. Found rubber ones that are the right thickness nut not tight enough.

Anyone know of any gloves (well I only need one) that will work? Or actually just fingertip protection is all I need.

I can't be the only person this happens to. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

James
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James D. Farrow
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« Reply #6 on: November 01, 2015, 11:36:02 am »

Why not dop the stone then position your fingers next to the stone when holding the stick. You can feel the stone and wheel this way.
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« Reply #7 on: November 02, 2015, 09:30:41 am »

When I was having issues with splitting of my callouses,I found that some of the large rubber fingertips worked for me.  They are tight, not too thin but still allowed me to feel the stone and dop when cutting and preforming and did a good job of gripping the stone as well.

Bob Johannes
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« Reply #8 on: November 02, 2015, 09:40:14 am »

James,

I use 8 mil. nitrile gloves made by Showa Best Glove. They are thick enough to provide protection but not so much that you loose tactile feeling. Pretty much have a pair on all the time when trim cutting (with oil) or shaping (with water). Saves my skin and finger  nails when shaping. They are fairly snug and on occasion I'll grind through the glove but overall they offer pretty good protection. I buy boxes of em....good stuff.  

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0074BHC1I?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s00

Cheers,

Kent
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James D. Farrow
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« Reply #9 on: November 02, 2015, 03:28:42 pm »

Thanks!

I put them in my wish list.

I already ordered some finger cots so will try those first.

The  Showa ones, Amazon US doesn't ship to Canada and
on Amazon Canada they are $35.00 so will see.

James
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James D. Farrow
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« Reply #10 on: November 02, 2015, 04:27:33 pm »

I have been wearing plain ole latex surgical gloves that you can buy at any pharmacy and many grocery stores.  I get 50 for around $5.  I wear a pair while cabbing and then take them off and if they are not torn, turn them inside out to dry and then i can wear them again.  They don't give much protection to grinding off finger tips, but they help me grip the slippery wet stone and they keep my hands dry which is really important in our cold climate where getting your fingers wet often, will lead to the fingertips splitting.  I am just careful about keeping my fingers away from fast moving things.  In the beginning i did grind down a fingernail or two and once or twice hit the edge of a grinding wheel, but i just am careful and don't cab or make jewelry when i am falling asleep.

there are tons of gloves of all kind online.  i have even put one pair over another for more protection.

Mark
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James D. Farrow
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« Reply #11 on: November 02, 2015, 04:45:02 pm »

Thanks!

I know eventually I will learn not to let my fingers touch the disc. I am new to this and
didn't even know it was happening until I saw the blood. I was fine on the coarser discs
it was only when I got up to 500, 800, 1200,... that the problem started, I gather that
since they feel smooth you don't feel it like you do the coarser ones.

Oh well, all part of the learning process.

James

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James D. Farrow
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« Reply #12 on: November 02, 2015, 08:52:14 pm »

I've used cutting gloves (the fish filleting kind) for wood carving in the past and while they are a little thick, they aren't anywhere near work glove thickness. There are also fairly tight, fine-weave cotton liner gloves you can get I think at hardware stores, they provide light protection but still tactile sense for the fingertips.
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James D. Farrow
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« Reply #13 on: November 22, 2015, 01:09:54 pm »

Had my finger cots for a while now. They work fine. You don't have to
use them on all fingers, just the ones you tend to touch the discs with.

The only slight problem I noticed is that when they get really wet they
tend to be slippery when holding the stones.  Just have to keep a rag
handy.

It's only when you get to the higher grits and the stone are smoother
and more slippery themselves.

James
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James D. Farrow
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« Reply #14 on: November 24, 2015, 12:42:52 am »

James,

Gloves are dangerous on some equipment so I use bandaids a lot.  For example on my 12 inch flat lap.  I put a bandaid on any finger that drags even slightly on a wheel - usually after noticing I have sanded a spot on my finger enough to be leaving red spots on the stone.  dancer5  Buying them by the case from Amazon makes it cost effective.

Now, the real trick with the use of bandaids on my index finger is when you are "scuff" polishing on 1200, 3000, 8000 and 14000.  I often turn the water completely off and dip the stone into a container of water for a very slight bit of moisture and then get the bandaid wet and let it drag a bit under the stone to keep the wheel just a bit damp.  I started doingt this with Jade but a lot of Jaspers and Agates are getting a better polish doing this so I try it on a lot of stone.  The real  trick is being sure to not burn the stone or get "blow outs" from creating steam in tiny pits or vugs in a stone.  So, you really need a light touch for the most part and fast movement across the wheels. 

Franly, with Jade I do a bit of Jade polishing on dry NOVA wheels.  I know they all say to never use them dry but I have learned that is really just a suggestion for my shop....  dancer5
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