General information about the Site

This lapidary and jewelry design community forum is dedicated to the novice, more experienced, and expert lapidaries and jewelry designers.

Forum cabochon in the Spotlight

Bob ( bobby1 ) shared this unknown druzy

Forum Jewelry Design in the Spotlight

John shared this beautiful pair of amethyst cufflinks

Forum Jewelry Design in the Spotlight

Mick B shared this stunning opal shell carving

Intarsias / Composites / Bead Making in the Spotlight

Kent shared this really nice Imperial Jasper pendant

Lapidary Related and Forum Member Shop Links

Brian Ababurko Silversmithing Classes / Rock Rollers Club

Dons Lapidary Arts

Idaho Rock Shop

Rare Rocks and Gems

Coyote Rainbow

Lightninghorse

Rocky Treasures

Talking Rocks

Fine Gem Designs

Idaho Rockman

Fine Woodwork and Lapidary

Darkstar Jewelry

DLC Gems

Teton Art Gallery

Art Cut Gems

Woman With A Torch

Lapidary Buy and Sell (Facebook Group)

Lapidary (Facebook Group)

Lapidary Equipment Marketplace (Facebook Group)


Lapidary / Gemstone Community Forum
June 15, 2019, 10:34:08 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
  Home Help Search Login Register  

Citrine carving

Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Citrine carving  (Read 608 times)
Debbie K
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1139


« on: August 04, 2015, 09:09:17 pm »

I haven't posted anything since I nicked my index finger tendon. It has gotten better, but it's still weak and I haven't been carving that much.

I'm not sure if I've posted this or not; if I have, I apologize for double posting.

I haven't been participating as much as I should so I'll try to remedy that. This photo is taken with my new toy, a Celestron microscope, and since the scope was handheld it's not a great picture.

It's a pale citrine, and was a dream to carve. Quartz carves like butter and polishes great; just have to be careful not to let it get too hot. I like what the clear citrine does with the light.

Debbie K


* alienweb.jpg (18.93 KB, 960x1280 - viewed 13 times.)
Report Spam   Logged

lithicbeads
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4924


« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2015, 10:02:07 pm »

I hope you recover soon. Very interesting carving , what are the dimensions?
Report Spam   Logged

mick B
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 697



« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2015, 05:19:54 am »

WOW, Debbie you are the master at carving faces, like the citrine quartz.
Report Spam   Logged
Debbie K
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1139


« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2015, 06:34:40 am »

Sorry, the dimensions are about 2" long x 1" wide x 5/8" think. This was a really nice, big clear piece and I carved all of it I could. When I pull the camera out, I'll take a better picture off it as this one is blurry.

I get tired of doing pretty faces, some times I just want to have fun!

Debbie K
Report Spam   Logged
kjsspot
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 262



WWW
« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2015, 08:53:37 am »

very spooky!  :D
Report Spam   Logged

southerly
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1101



« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2015, 07:04:56 am »

Awesome you are so skilled
Report Spam   Logged
55fossil
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 268


« Reply #6 on: August 06, 2015, 09:31:26 am »

That is so beautiful. Makes me want to take up carving. That would be right after I become talented.
Do you have a site where you sell these?
Report Spam   Logged

southerly
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1101



« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2015, 02:46:06 pm »

That is so beautiful. Makes me want to take up carving. That would be right after I become talented.
Do you have a site where you sell these?

Yup  bricks
Report Spam   Logged
Debbie K
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1139


« Reply #8 on: August 06, 2015, 02:52:03 pm »

I'm absolutely awful at selling and marketing. I've had some stuff in galleries in the past, but never got around to putting up a website.

I do have a Picasa page that has most all of my finished carvings.https://picasaweb.google.com/deborahkirkpatrick56 I can't tell you how many are sitting around in little boxes waiting to have something done with them; my version of "the island of misfit toys", or red-headed stepchildren.

I'm hoping that when my husband retires I can talk him into being my agent. He would have the nerve to ask for high prices and stick to them. I'm more likely to point out all the flaws and negotiate myself down.

Debbie K
Report Spam   Logged
55fossil
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 268


« Reply #9 on: August 06, 2015, 06:22:17 pm »

Debbie;

   I know what you mean. I quit selling in galleries and barely update my web sites. Selling on etsy and e-bay is 2 or 3 times a year until I run out of stem. So much more fun to find and polish rocks. I will check out your picasa soon. Chores to d and worked late.... No rocks tonight.  I tell people I have over 10,000 slabs and some of them are even good. They think I am joking.   neal
Report Spam   Logged

55fossil
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 268


« Reply #10 on: August 07, 2015, 06:51:52 am »

Debbie;       

    WOW:   Maybe I am the only one who has not looked at your Picasa site. Your work is incredible and there is so much to see. Where do you find time to do it all.  So any one who has not looked at Debbie's work should visit the site. So much more than just carvings. These are incredible art works that you can wear. I am humbled and with my ego that takes a lot.  neal
Report Spam   Logged

Helene
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2005



WWW
« Reply #11 on: August 07, 2015, 07:41:13 am »

So glad to see some new work from you Debbie.  Always, always a pleasure seeing your creative pieces.  You never dissapointe. Made my day. 
Report Spam   Logged

ileney
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 202


« Reply #12 on: August 07, 2015, 11:14:07 am »

Your work is incredible. I was just looking around the website and marvelling. I can't believe the 3d shapes you are able to get. Amazing.

Report Spam   Logged
Debbie K
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1139


« Reply #13 on: August 08, 2015, 12:13:55 pm »

Thanks, all of you, for the kind words. I was afraid after I hurt my hand I wouldn't be able to carve again. This was the first thing I did afterwards.

I'm finding that the carving isn't as hard on my finger as the metalwork. I'm just grateful that I'm still able to do anything.

Here's a better picture, taken with a real camera.


* fullwhitebkgrndsm.jpg (62.45 KB, 1064x1600 - viewed 8 times.)
Report Spam   Logged
lithicbeads
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4924


« Reply #14 on: August 08, 2015, 05:24:08 pm »

 This is always a bit of an unfair question asked of artists but what is your artistic motivation for your carvings. I know that is a very personal question but carving like sculpture is a very difficult media to begin so having a good emotional reason for carving will help inspire people to begin. Where does the passion evident in the finished product begin?What I like best about your work is that it seems aesthetically complete to me , a unified form that expresses your vision well.
Report Spam   Logged

kjsspot
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 262



WWW
« Reply #15 on: August 08, 2015, 07:42:26 pm »

much better photo!
Report Spam   Logged

Debbie K
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1139


« Reply #16 on: August 09, 2015, 08:20:15 pm »

In answer to your question, rarely do I start with an idea in mind of a particular thing to make. I look at the rocks that I carve and often let the shape or color dictate what it becomes.

Sometimes there is an overarching theme to pieces; the theme probably doesn't make any sense to anyone but me. I've been stuck on two themes over the last 7 or more years: An aquatic theme and a Science Fiction/Fantasy theme. Anyone who has looked at my Picasa page can easily see what falls where in these categories. I've also spent many years trying to figure out what constitutes physical beauty; particularly women's faces, especially how many different ways people can be considered "beautiful". I also have many religious carvings and enamel pieces; but as most of those carvings are out of wood they're not on the Picasa page which is dedicated to stone carving.

This is the way my mind works: I saw a butterfly out in my backyard one day and had the strange and uncomfortable thought that perhaps their colors and markings actually meant something. And then I had the even more disquieting thought that perhaps our features meant something. My whole inner dialog on the notion reminded me of a science fiction book I had read as a child, a book called "The Seedling Planets" by James Blish, who over 50 years ago posited the premise of seeding planets with genetically modified humans. My theory is that no matter how much we change, or are changed, some things will remain the same. Even if our outer appearance is altered, our characters will still be either good or bad, and our impulses will still be self-serving or generous. I believe that genetic imprinting leaves its mark on all of us, despite our efforts to escape it.

I base this in part on my own heritage: I am approximately 1/4 American Indian. Each late summer/early fall when the weather begins to change I have a practically irresistible urge to go west. It took me years to understand that I was on some primal level wanting to go where the buffalo were going. Here is the sad part: The buffalo are all gone and I am much further west than my ancestors ever were, but the urge remains.

So when you look at a piece such as the citrine, my hope is that it embodies some of these concepts. I am imagining worlds and people that echo back to a history they donít know but sense and have much in common with us. This piece is a cousin to the sculpture "Pantropy" on my Picasa page; a part human/part insect person.

For the most part, I never have a plan. I carve until I get one. I'm not particularly complicated or deep, and I think my work is like me. I also have practically no visualization ability; I have to make something to be able to "see" it. The assemblage pieces are especially this way; I get one piece done that I like the look of and start moving other pieces or rock or metal around it until I please myself. I don't know if it helps or hinders, but I often imagine what kind of little life these little people have while I am working on them.

I, like everyone else on this forum, have a imperative to make things. I don't know if this could be considered passion, but if it is, all of this group has it, too. I make things because I have to. It seems that the world is separated into either makers or consumers, and most of us will tend one way or the other.

Most of what I make I would consider more cerebral than emotional, which many in the world of art would consider a major failing. I have heard it argued that the only justification for art is to evoke emotion, and I don't know that anything I make is particularly moving. I sometimes love, pity or dislike the little things I make, but that's probably because I'm emotionally invested. I would love to express calm, serene and balanced things, but unfortunately I don't think it's in my nature.

Hope this answers some of your questions, but this is only my process, or lack of it! I'd love to hear from others about what motivates them. Sorry if some of this doesn't make much sense, due to family health issues I'm operating on only 3 hours of sleep. I'm probably over-explaining.

Debbie
Report Spam   Logged
asianfire
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 4784



« Reply #17 on: August 09, 2015, 11:05:35 pm »

I'm absolutely awful at selling and marketing. I'm more likely to point out all the flaws and negotiate myself down.
Debbie K

I certainly know that feeling, and catch myself doing exactly that all the time.  bricks

Most of what I make I would consider more cerebral than emotional, which many in the world of art would consider a major failing. I have heard it argued that the only justification for art is to evoke emotion, and I don't know that anything I make is particularly moving. I sometimes love, pity or dislike the little things I make, but that's probably because I'm emotionally invested. I would love to express calm, serene and balanced things, but unfortunately I don't think it's in my nature. Debbie

Your last post is an absolute home-run for me. Are you sure we are not related somehow?  dunno
You describe several things in your process, that I would not dare to explain to people as I fear they would think of me as either a daydreamer with a childish imagination (something I hope to preserve for the rest of my life to some extend), and or ready to call the asylum altogether. Cant help it, I like fables and fairy-tales, and working on something does make them come to life. Just look at the two girls with the raven last year, started out with a basic idea, and over time a whole story fell into place together with alterations on the stone.

Feel very strongly about your paragraph as quoted above. What is calm? Even under the most serene conditions, there is change in the air and hence chaos! But I understand what you mean as it happens to me every-time I try faces. I try as hard as I can to get young features and end up in old ones. Looks like every time I try barbie, it turns out a witch.
By the end of the day, I resign to the fact, as it being natural versus imagined ideals. 
Report Spam   Logged

I shut my eyes in order to see ~ Gauguin
_______________________________

When you realize there is nothing lacking - the whole world belongs to you ~ Lao Tzu
--------------------------------------------------
Personal website introduction.      brilliantchallenge.webs.com/
ileney
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 202


« Reply #18 on: August 10, 2015, 08:16:56 am »

Debbie, Your post was really inspiring. I am really amazed to hear that you feel you don't have great visualization skills ahead of time and that somehow you figure it out as you go along and these pieces fall together that way. (I have heard great writers say the same- that when they write they don't plan to use foreshadowing or metaphors, but they just appear on their own, part of the subconscience expressing itself.) When I consider for example the chrysoprase woman with the bare shoulder, which I assume is in two separate pieces, that just blows my mind. I can't believe you didn't visualize that and plan it point by point every step of the way.

As a technical question, I was wondering what you use to carve? Is it an air pencil grinder, flexshaft, or something else?  Do you rough grind on the cabber to a specific shape to start? I have heard people on this board mention all sorts of things but as I have never seen carving done, it is very hard for me to imagine how you even begin.

Thank you so much for sharing your thought process and motivation.
Report Spam   Logged
Debbie K
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1139


« Reply #19 on: August 10, 2015, 08:20:43 pm »

I started carving stone with a 5 speed Dremel with a flexshaft and cheap Harbor Freight diamond bits, and also some small dental burs that my dentist gave me. I used a glass grinder with a small round bit to reduce things down to size, then got a tile saw and then a small rock trim saw. Then I refurbished a three wheel grinder and got 2 hard diamond wheels. I use the side of them to cut out wedges and such. Along the way I acquired, in order, a Grobet flexshaft, a Wecheer flexshaft and 3 Foredoms. I got small handpieces with collets pretty soon also, as the big chucked handpieces hurt my hand. I also got about a bazillion more diamond burs, stones and diamond files. I recently acquired dental air handpieces but haven't had the chance to hook everything up to a compressor. This is an addictive hobby...

The green chrysoprase lady was carved out of one piece, and the twist is because there was a sandy spot in the rock that I had to get rid of, and her gesture/posture was dictated by what was left. The silver was a lost wax casting that I carved to fit her.

I do have a Fine Arts background in oil painting, which helped by exposing me to all kinds of art. I've looked at so many books, works, slides, magazines, etc., and I think it makes a difference. That, I guess, and trying. Many people never even try. There was a saying around when I was in school, "Looks right; Is right". Sometimes things that are right don't look right, and I've always remembered that. The other thing we were taught was "don't do things that have been done before". I disagree a little with the last one, because I've learned a lot trying to emulate artists and styles and you get more skills along the way.

Kurt, we probably are related; you are German, are you not? I'm part Prussian/German, there are probably not even 6 degrees of separation. Yes, it is a little scary telling folks what goes on in my mind and even sometimes showing new works; kinda like those bad dreams when you realize you don't have on any clothes. Some pieces seem as if they disclose too much about me; I am a pretty private person.

I have found that we often do not need to tell the story of the pieces, they tell their own stories themselves and they say different things to different people. And sometimes we're like helicopter parents trying to make them be what we want them to be, and miss that in failing to make them conform to our ideas they sometimes turn out better than we could imagine.

I still want to hear how other people approach what they do. I knew one carver that made drawings or worked from photographs and took measurements and transferred them. It seemed too much like real work to me, but his carvings were exceptional.

Debbie K
Report Spam   Logged
ileney
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 202


« Reply #20 on: August 10, 2015, 08:51:09 pm »

Thank you so much for all the information. I have an old dental flexshaft and some bits so maybe I'll try something soft, like lapis, and see how it goes with something basic and simple like a leaf or just a basic abstract shape. I love all your pieces. They are truly magnificent.
Report Spam   Logged


Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum | Buy traffic for your forum/website

Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy