General information about the Site

This lapidary and jewelry design community forum is dedicated to the novice, more experienced, and expert lapidaries and jewelry designers.

Forum cabochon in the Spotlight

Bob ( bobby1 ) shared this unknown druzy

Forum Jewelry Design in the Spotlight

John shared this beautiful pair of amethyst cufflinks

Forum Jewelry Design in the Spotlight

Mick B shared this stunning opal shell carving

Intarsias / Composites / Bead Making in the Spotlight

Kent shared this really nice Imperial Jasper pendant

Lapidary Related and Forum Member Shop Links

Brian Ababurko Silversmithing Classes / Rock Rollers Club

Dons Lapidary Arts

Idaho Rock Shop

Rare Rocks and Gems

Coyote Rainbow

Lightninghorse

Rocky Treasures

Talking Rocks

Fine Gem Designs

Idaho Rockman

Fine Woodwork and Lapidary

Darkstar Jewelry

DLC Gems

Teton Art Gallery

Art Cut Gems

Woman With A Torch

Lapidary Buy and Sell (Facebook Group)

Lapidary (Facebook Group)

Lapidary Equipment Marketplace (Facebook Group)


Lapidary / Gemstone Community Forum
April 25, 2019, 02:37:38 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
  Home Help Search Login Register  

Help me get what I need and not have to replace down the road for cabbing please

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Help me get what I need and not have to replace down the road for cabbing please  (Read 285 times)
datura222
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 5


« on: July 21, 2015, 10:43:12 am »

I am interested in getting rough, making slabs and ultimately cabochons.

So far on my list is:

HP 24" slab saw
HP 6" trim saw
Genie

I know that the genie has a side wheel, but I am not sure if it is large enough for polishing larger slabs...also is it really the best thing to use for powder fine polishing with felt/leather pads?

I do not want to have to replace any equipment out of regret....so if you were me, would you get a separate flat lap with diamond pad and a wheel polisher for oxides etc, and which ones would you get?

Thanks so much for any input...this forum is a goldmine of information and has been so very helpful!!
Report Spam   Logged

mirkaba
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2303



« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2015, 11:16:32 am »

If it were me..............starting out but knowing what I know.
10"-14" slab saw
6" trim saw
8" grinding, sanding, polishing unit with at least one end lap. 2 hard wheels, 2 expandos and leather polish pad.

Knowing that I will want/need more down the road is a given........ hide
Report Spam   Logged

Bob

Gathering dust in Montana.
jakesrocks
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2107


New Toy.


« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2015, 01:40:27 pm »

I agree with Bob. A 24" slab saw is kind of overkill for someone just starting out. Not to mention a rather large outlay of cash. If you must have a larger slab saw, I'd suggest something in the 16" to 18" range. At least as a beginner, if you mess up & ruin a blade, the smaller sizes are much cheaper to replace.

For a trim saw, I think I'd go with a 10", which can also be used for slabbing small material. ( I have saws from 3" all the way up to 16". Sold my 24" because it was in the way more often than  in use ).

The Genie is a good all around machine. I've had mine since the early 90's and love it.

As for polishing pads, Some materials work up better on leather than they do on felt, and vice versa. Also, you'll want different polish pads for different types of polish. Be sure to get a good supply of large heavy duty zip lock bags to store your different polish pads in, to prevent cross contamination.

The end disc on a Genie is only 6" dia., so not really good for polishing large slabs. A good flat lap, or even a bull wheel would be a better choice for the big stuff.
Report Spam   Logged

A day spent without learning something new, is a day wasted.

Don

55fossil
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 268


« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2015, 02:01:38 pm »

   Look at the Lortone Max Pro in the please identify convo. I have one of these as well as a Genie. Sometimes you just cannot beat silicon carbide and also the large face for doing bigger cabochons. Space for shop use is the biggest issue that you might want to mention. I have a barn that I share with my horses. They get less room every year.  Seriously, if you have room you get multiple saws. A 4, 10 and 18 or 20 inch saw are kind of normal for many rock nuts, I mean lapidaries. Budget is the other big decider for many of us. A 10 inch diamond lap is a necessity for me. I also love my Richardson's leather wheel for final polishing my slabs and cabochons. The list is infinite if you have no budget, a lot of room and a tolerant wife.
Report Spam   Logged

light house jack
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 261


« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2015, 02:44:26 pm »

I totally agree that a 24" saw is overkill for a beginner much less a LOT more expensive blades. I would search for # 1 choice COVINGTON. And #2 an original Highland Park.  Covington still has parts for saws made over 50 years ago and you just cannot beat their customer service. A friend purchased a new 16" Covington and is very happy with it.  My 1950's model is still humming away.  As for a trim saw, I am a huge fan of Harbor Freight tile saws with a good lapidary blade on it.  I teach on Genies and some of the machines at schools where I have taught are 25 years old. Easy to maintain and easy to get a wonderful cab.
Report Spam   Logged

hulagrub
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6752


When you cultivate man, you turn up all the clods


« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2015, 09:38:37 pm »

Your list looks good to me! I don't use the different polishes, just Zam on a felt wheel for turquoise and everything else diamond.
Report Spam   Logged

Dave, a certified Rockaholic

Michael S Hoover - Redrummd
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1647


Art In Stone


WWW
« Reply #6 on: July 21, 2015, 11:41:13 pm »

I use my 18 inch saw the most and it will take 16 inch blades if you want a thin one for expensive stone.   I recommend a good tile saw with a lapidary blade as a much lower cost alternative to a trim saw.  I do use my bandsaw much more than any trim saw. 

You cannot go wrong with a Geni.....
Report Spam   Logged



Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum | Buy traffic for your forum/website

Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy