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Lapidary / Gemstone Community Forum
February 17, 2019, 12:35:43 pm
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Waste Water from Grinder/Polisher?

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Author Topic: Waste Water from Grinder/Polisher?  (Read 363 times)
James D. Farrow
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« on: June 20, 2015, 03:55:54 am »

O.K. I have read in several threads that it is unwise to pour your waste water
down the drain as the stone particles will (I guess when the water evaporates)
set like cement and would block the drain.

Correct?

Will it set like cement in a bucket if I just let the water evaporate as well?

Will it set like cement in any container if I let it sit there and the water evaporates?

If the above is correct I think some of you will know what I am thinking.

James
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James D. Farrow
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Charles
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« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2015, 04:37:41 am »

James, my answer is yes it will. The difference being is that in a bucket or other holder is that you can break it up and dump it out. Why not use the waste water to water plants, grass and such. The rock dust in it will not hurt the plants or grass.   hide

Charles
where our 5 years drought is finally broken
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James D. Farrow
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« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2015, 05:04:59 am »

James, my answer is yes it will. The difference being is that in a bucket or other holder is that you can break it up and dump it out. Why not use the waste water to water plants, grass and such. The rock dust in it will not hurt the plants or grass.   hide

Charles
where our 5 years drought is finally broken


What I am getting at is I don't want to chuck it out. The word that caught my attention in the several threads was "Cement".
If it really sets like cement it could be carved, shaped, whatever. Does it really set like cement? What binds the particles
together? Or when it dries out does it just crumple when picked up?

James
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James D. Farrow
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Charles
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« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2015, 05:09:55 am »

Yes, it crumbles can you work with it not really. It a lot of it builds up in your pipes it is almost impossible to get out. In that respect it is like cement. It will really block the pipes.
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James D. Farrow
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« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2015, 05:21:16 am »

Yes, it crumbles can you work with it not really. It a lot of it builds up in your pipes it is almost impossible to get out. In that respect it is like cement. It will really block the pipes.

Thanks!

Wasn't going to dump down the drain anyway. Even soft food scrapes will block a drain eventually.

Crumbles - That's what I thought. To make it set like cement you would have to mix the dried particles with some kind of binding agent
.
Don't know what kind though.

Just thought it would be interesting to see what could be done with it if you could get it to set solid like a rock.

Jasper bricks - then carve them. Who knows.  lol

James
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James D. Farrow
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Charles
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« Reply #5 on: June 20, 2015, 06:05:02 am »

No idea how to do it or what kind of binder. Maybe the way they were made. With a lot of heat and pressure  lol
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James D. Farrow
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« Reply #6 on: June 20, 2015, 06:16:01 am »

No idea how to do it or what kind of binder. Maybe the way they were made. With a lot of heat and pressure  lol

For that I would have to get my Ex to sit on it. But she's not talking to me.  lol

James
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James D. Farrow
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55fossil
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« Reply #7 on: June 20, 2015, 07:00:20 am »

There are uses for crumbles, etc from your saw. Some people save them and use them in intarsia. You can grind them up in a mortar and use the dust mixed with epoxy. This works great with rock rich in color like blue. The stones they sell from Mount St. Helens are just heated ash from the volcano.
    As for watering plants I might be cautious. Many stones are full of toxic materials so do not put them on your garden stuff. There is a lot of lead, sulfur and mercury in agate such as those from Graveyard Point for one.
And they will clog up your sewer pipes. I let mine dry out in a bucket and toss the dry waste in my garbage.
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James D. Farrow
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« Reply #8 on: June 20, 2015, 07:15:25 am »

There are uses for crumbles, etc from your saw. Some people save them and use them in intarsia. You can grind them up in a mortar and use the dust mixed with epoxy. This works great with rock rich in color like blue. The stones they sell from Mount St. Helens are just heated ash from the volcano.
    As for watering plants I might be cautious. Many stones are full of toxic materials so do not put them on your garden stuff. There is a lot of lead, sulfur and mercury in agate such as those from Graveyard Point for one.
And they will clog up your sewer pipes. I let mine dry out in a bucket and toss the dry waste in my garbage.

Like this for example:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B003CHQWDW/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=2W3NCMIGAJR6L&coliid=I3PQPR7SXVCELU

Complete Instructions and project ideas enclosed Measure equal amounts of resin and hardener then mix. Add colorants, granite powders or found objects, pour into mold and allow to cure. Cast you own decorative knobs, and pulls, jewelry pieces, pendants, charms and buttons, coasters, paperweights, figurines and more. Quantity: Net 16 ounces (US), 473 mL DANGER: Contains epoxy resin and polyamine hardener that may be harmful if misused. Please read cautions on individual containers carefully. KEEP OUT of reach of children.

Like it says you can pour into a mold. Skip the carving (for us non-artistic type people).

James
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James D. Farrow
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stonemon
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« Reply #9 on: June 20, 2015, 08:08:41 am »

I have been slabbing Trent agate and I am very careful not to get the slurry near anything...... : (
Bill
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bobby1
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« Reply #10 on: June 20, 2015, 09:15:08 am »

I have some oak trees that love the slurry that I toss under them. They are thriving even in the severe drought that we in California are experiencing. They are downhill from my septic system so they really benefit from the available ground water.
Bob
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trigon
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« Reply #11 on: June 20, 2015, 09:42:34 am »

I have a certain amount of forest land, so I dump my slurry out under the trees. They don't seem to mind it and I doubt anything is getting poisoned by any trace chemicals that might be in the slurry. I wouldn't use it in a garden area where edible plants might take it up. Oily stuff from the slab and trim saws goes in the garbage.

Chips and odd little pieces are something that I save up and run in a tumbler every so often. Even if I have no use for the end product, the local Rock Club is generally happy to have it.
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jakesrocks
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New Toy.


« Reply #12 on: June 20, 2015, 09:45:54 am »

A couple of uses for that slurry.

#1  If you have gophers in your yard, pour it down their holes. They hate the stuff & after a few applications will move to your neighbors yard.

#2  Let it dry in a bucket. Break off a chunk & add it to the rough grind stage in your tumblers. Instant thickening agent.

If you're working with green or blue colored rocks, they probably contain copper. Copper can be deadly to many plants or fish & other water critters. Let that mud dry & send it to the landfill.
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Trails
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« Reply #13 on: June 20, 2015, 01:34:25 pm »

Tumbler thickener is ingenious...

I pour mine over and between the crevices of my paver deck, makes the brick-lines look great, keeps the growth down, and sometimes I get all sorts of little chips of shinies all over. Most of everything but the saw waste just makes a rusty to cruddy colour.

Stuffs great in foreclosure situations.
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Tay
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« Reply #14 on: June 22, 2015, 04:36:47 pm »

Most of the "cement" issues with drains are from cleaning grit slurry from tumblers.  You should not have anything but dust if you dry the Ameritool waste.  Most rock minerals are beneficial to plants.  Best to check individual rocks for known hazards to be safe (mercury, lead, radioactive, etc.).
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