Lapidary / Gemstone Community Forum
May 30, 2020, 06:16:17 am
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
 
  Home Help Search Login Register  

New to carving, looking for tool advice

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: New to carving, looking for tool advice  (Read 396 times)
BluetangClan
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 49


View Profile
« on: March 30, 2015, 06:38:19 am »

Well I have been making cabs for awhile, got a little bored and have been stockpiling cabs to the point my wife is like "so what are you going to do with them?" I have figured out better use of my time and would like to get more into carving. So looking on here I have come up with some tool ideas that I wonder if they are good or too much. Trying to do this on a budget, and I do not do this to make money, this is mostly for SCA related small knick knacks for gifts and such.
First one I found based of the tool recommendation in a sticky up top.
http://www.amazon.com/Foredom-2230-SR-Jewelers-Kit/dp/B0015GBNL8/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1427717937&sr=8-1&keywords=foredom+2230

More costly than I wanted to go and I know little about the kit that comes with it, good starter set or would I be better off with a basic flex shaft grinder and a separate kit?

http://www.amazon.com/SE-979FSG-Flexible-Grinder-Switch/dp/B000NW4YRK/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1427717937&sr=8-4&keywords=foredom+2230
 

Question on shanks, will a 1/8" shank fit the foredom? Always hated fractions, this is where the metric system really shines with everything in mm.
Report Spam   Logged

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter

slabbercabber
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 695


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2015, 06:53:41 am »

I believe the first kit will have a lot of things you will never use.  It is also way over priced for the little difference in tools included.  I'd Start with the basic kit and add what you need as you go.  On the other hand, the heavier duty motor and foot control will give you the option of working faster and lasting longer if you decide to stay with it.
Report Spam   Logged
Debbie K
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1099


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2015, 08:00:19 am »

I used a Dremel flex shaft for years, but anything with a foot pedal really will serve you better. My Grobet lasted 3-4 years before I killed it (versus 3 Dremels in the same time period). The Foredoms will last a lot longer; haven't managed to kill it or the Wecheer yet.

You're better off buying just the machine and buying bits separately. You're going to need diamond bits http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/149386/Diamond-Tip-Carving-Burr-Set-120-piece.aspx like these.

There are many threads in this section that deal with polishing carvings. I was trying to find one specific one, but the information seems to be scattered through out so you need to read thru yourself. The most important thing to know is that you need to carve wet (hence the flex shafts).

Debbie K

p.s. Found it! This link deals with tools, bits, stones, etc. http://gemstone.smfforfree4.com/index.php/topic,10926.0.html
Report Spam   Logged
lopacki
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 176



View Profile
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2015, 10:20:06 am »

I have two Foredom SR machines in my studio. I have been using Foredom flex shaft machines since 1978 and have never worn one out I have upgraded and given away my old ones. If you buy a SR machine I recommend buying the dial speed control for it as the foot control leaves a lot to be desired when it comes to precise speed control. If you get the Foredom make sure you get the 44T handpiece, this handpiece has collets that go up to 1/4 inch shank.

Regarding burrs go to Amazon and do a search for diamond burr sets. Buy the fifty piece set (they are inexpensive) this will give you a great assortment and you will find the burrs that work best for what your wanting to do.

All my best ........... Danny

Carving forum many carvers on this forum
http://www.thecarvingpath.net/

another link for carving burrs
www.lopacki.com/burrs/
Report Spam   Logged
Marty
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 52


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2015, 05:40:04 pm »

Which Foredom  grinder is better, the collet type or chuck. Is one preferred for carving more? Would the chuck type get loaded up with debris, crud  and be a problem? I am in the market for one of these myself and am undecided which way to go.
Report Spam   Logged

Debbie K
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1099


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: April 01, 2015, 07:25:33 am »

Marty:

I think it may be about personal preference. I have both types of handpieces, and I prefer the one that holds collets, primarily because it is slimmer. I can't afford the quick-change so I have no experience with that type.

Wecheer makes a slim handpiece that fits on Foredom (at a lower price) and I can work with it for hours without getting a cramp in my hand. The larger keyed Foredom, Wecheer and Grobet handpieces hurt my hand. But if you're a guy with big hands that might fit your hand perfectly.

Debbie K
Report Spam   Logged
lopacki
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 176



View Profile
« Reply #6 on: April 01, 2015, 10:41:06 am »

Some of you may find this hard to believe I have on my bench one #30 chuck style hand piece 3 #44T and 2 #28 hand pieces. I prefer using the collet hand pieces for any and all use of diamond burrs the collet makes the burr run perfectly true as long as the burrs is made right. I only use the #30 for drilling or for the odd size shank that I do not have a collet for.

The reason for more than one kind of collet hand piece. The 44T comes with a 1/8, 3/32 and 1/4 inch collet, rather than taking the time to change out the collet on one hand piece I just pop the hand piece off of the shaft and pop the one needed in its place. The # 28 comes with a 3/32 and 1/8 inch collet so two hand pieces for the same reason.

Below is an image of my carving bench that was in the house prior to my new studio being built you will notice the hand pieces on it. The bench is in the new studio and I assure you that is is never this clean, I had just cleaned it when this image was shot.

All my best .............. Danny


* b2.jpg (240.74 KB, 1200x786 - viewed 10 times.)
Report Spam   Logged
BluetangClan
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 49


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: June 16, 2015, 05:47:12 am »

Whats a good cutting bit that will remove a lot of material after using a saw?

Report Spam   Logged
Debbie K
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1099


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: June 16, 2015, 07:39:51 am »

Someone gave me these http://www.harborfreight.com/50-pc-diamond-rotary-point-set-69665.html, they're not high quality and wear out quickly but while they last they do the job.

Harbor Freight also sells these http://www.harborfreight.com/large-diamond-rotary-grinding-wheel-set-4-pc-69658.html which have lasted fairly well. I made a holder for my flexshaft for the smaller bits, and a point carver for the bigger ones.

Jade Carver sells diamond bits that are larger http://jadecarver.com/DiamondTools.htm. Lopacki sells medium/large bits http://lopacki.com/burrs/ that, in my opinion, are of adequate size to do most carving.

Try to remove as much as possible with the saw. If you look at the photos I attached, the point carver is capable of having a small blade super grinder attached in place of a grinding wheel. A super grinder is a stack of diamond saw blades with a thin spacer between them and it will remove lots of material very quickly (use with a water drip, lots of water). I bought the small grinder blades which are really meant to cut concrete (they are too hard to work really well on rock) but they'll work for a while.

Thanks to this forum for explaining to me why the diamond blades sold at the hardware stores are not good to cut rock. I always wondered why they shouldn't be used.

Debbie K


* wood-carver.jpg (11.68 KB, 600x600 - viewed 3 times.)

* point-carver.jpg (13.79 KB, 600x600 - viewed 5 times.)
Report Spam   Logged
BluetangClan
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 49


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: June 16, 2015, 08:48:40 am »

All of those appear to be variations of bits I have. I guess I was wondering if there is an actual carving bit itself for bulk removal, maybe a bladed bit or something rather than a sander.

I take it the actual process is the same as a flat lap. Run things over real well with the low grit and move progressively upward in grits for a polish?
Report Spam   Logged
Debbie K
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1099


View Profile
« Reply #10 on: June 16, 2015, 10:12:25 am »

Yes. I make bits out of wood (think turnings from craft stores) and mount them on cheap drill bits with good epoxy and use diamond grit and oil, progressively finer, to polish.

Search for "super grinder" or "supergrinder" on this site to see an example of one. If you can't find a picture of one, I'll try to take a picture tomorrow (weather permitting, tropical storm happening here) and post it for you. These are for bulk removal.

Here are a few of my homemade metal and wood bits that I use for polishing. This is just for 1 grit (600), and I make identical bits for 100, 200, 1200, 3000 and 8000 to polish.

Debbie K


* Picture1.png (527.09 KB, 510x383 - viewed 4 times.)
Report Spam   Logged


Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum

Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy