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Lapidary / Gemstone Community Forum
December 10, 2018, 08:58:07 am
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Grind silver on a diamond wheel?

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Author Topic: Grind silver on a diamond wheel?  (Read 465 times)
Talusman
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« on: January 31, 2015, 03:55:58 pm »

Question: Will grinding silver on a sintered diamond wheel (wet) glaze the diamonds?

It sure would make shaping pendant backs a lot quicker.

Thanks!

-Jeremy
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Steve
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« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2015, 06:19:43 pm »

I've done it on SC wheels............but I don't know about diamond sintered.................
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Steve.............The Silver Fox

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dickb
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« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2015, 08:15:32 pm »

What about using a 1" belt sander. They are not that hard to find used or new and if you use a fine enough grit they should be a lot faster getting to the file stage.

Thinking out loud here.

Dickb
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PhilNM
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« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2015, 08:35:01 pm »

Diamond wheels aren't made for metal use.... but you should ask the manufacturer or palce where you bought them...
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Isotelus
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« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2015, 10:18:02 pm »

I can speak to this. Grinding silver on a sintered wheel  can flow a little silver over the diamond grit but I have found grinding a a little fine sand stone will remove the soft metal from the wheel. I have been using a flat lap for years to trim down a high silver bezels to more perfectly fit the stones that have  been cut for the mounting.
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Bryan
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« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2015, 05:15:58 am »

Thanks all - I'll try it out on a SC expando belt and if that's too slow try the wheel.

Cheers!

-Jeremy
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Michael S Hoover - Redrummd
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« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2015, 09:47:50 am »

I grind metal on my metal wheels very frequently.  It won't hurt them.....
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metalartz
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« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2015, 12:30:36 pm »

Same as Michael,  love to grind metal on the diamond wheels,  the water keeps every thing cool,  and if it does load with metal, just grind some stone.   Remember to keep the grinding water with silver, gold in it ,  let it dry and refine it.
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David

Talusman
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« Reply #8 on: February 02, 2015, 01:47:47 pm »

Tried it out last night and it worked pretty well. Developed a burr which I had to file off by hand, but overall pretty speedy. Thanks to all.

-Jeremy
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Michael S Hoover - Redrummd
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« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2015, 10:00:25 pm »

I use the NOVA wheels to remove burrs.....
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bobby1
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« Reply #10 on: February 03, 2015, 11:06:38 pm »

I routinely sharpen chisels, tweak parts for my wife's GTO, sharpen kitchen knives and screwdrivers on my wheels. Just touch a stone to the wheel and it is back to normal. I do make it a point to clean the metal grindings out of the water trays so they don't turn into a pile of rust.
Bob
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Mark
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« Reply #11 on: February 04, 2015, 07:01:08 am »

I wasn't exactly sure what Jeremy was asking but i am guessing that you want to smooth the pendant back edges after sawing them out of a sheet.  I usually hand file mine down and i seem to really enjoy the feeling of the filing motion and its relaxing to me.  I have also used a Sears grinding arbor with wheels on either side of the motor to quickly grind down the rough edges of pendant backs.  I think its a bit of overkill and its easy to grind off too much so i am always careful to stop before i go to far.  I then use a small fine grit hand file.  I also sometimes use my flexshaft with a small grinding wheel that i get with 4 grit sizes from coarse to extra fine.  That is a really nice way to finish the pendant edge and those wheels are really good for rounding the metal so it doesn't have sharp edges.  I also take a small piece of wood just larger than a hand sander size of sand paper.  I tape sand paper to the board and then sand my bezel so the edges are even and lie flat on the pendant backing and then again when i want to adjust the top of the bezel to fit the cab just right.  And last but not least, i have used my Genie wheels a few times to grind pendant edges.  I guess i prefer the hand file method as its more relaxing and enjoyable, unless i need to take off a lot of metal and quickly and then the grinder and Genie are better choices.
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Talusman
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« Reply #12 on: February 04, 2015, 08:06:11 am »

Hi Mark,

My sawing skills aren't great so there's usually a good bit of metal to remove to get the pendant back to the right shape. I'm going to use the wheels to get the rough shape, then hand finish with files/sanding. I enjoy the process of finishing by hand, but find roughing out by hand tedious - I just keep thinking I could use the time to cut another stone! :)

Thanks for all of the advice - it's very helpful.

-Jeremy
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Mark
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« Reply #13 on: February 04, 2015, 08:54:10 am »

When i first started making pendants, i would saw the piece out of the sheet and the first couple of times, used those twisted aviation shears to trim the silver backing, but they tend to bend the metal they cut and i was not happy with the results.  So i just started sawing as close as possible to the pendant and then using the hand file.  Everything i read about sawing, hammering, soldering, etc., says to practice, practice, practice, but everything is expensive and i hate to just saw a sheet of metal into dozens of slivers, even if its copper or something cheaper, its still a waste.  So i guess my practice will just be over a period of years and it will be on real pieces.

Mark
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Carol M
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« Reply #14 on: February 04, 2015, 11:45:43 am »

When i first started making pendants, i would saw the piece out of the sheet and the first couple of times, used those twisted aviation shears to trim the silver backing, but they tend to bend the metal they cut and i was not happy with the results.  So i just started sawing as close as possible to the pendant and then using the hand file.  Everything i read about sawing, hammering, soldering, etc., says to practice, practice, practice, but everything is expensive and i hate to just saw a sheet of metal into dozens of slivers, even if its copper or something cheaper, its still a waste.  So i guess my practice will just be over a period of years and it will be on real pieces.

Mark

I was at an artisan show at The Distillery District here in Toronto last summer and watched a woman sitting on a stool, with a hand saw, taking various coins [like a buffalo nickle] and she'd saw out the background behind the buffalo].  The 'mutilated coins' were made into pendants.
I'm with Mark.  I'm starting to saw [using the right size blade helps, for thicker material, also, don't forget Bur-Life or equal lubricant] but it's easy to get into a sort of Zen state.  Long easy strokes can be very relaxing. yippie
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Ciao,
Carol M
"Pursue Your Passions....."
"Imagine the Possibilities!"
"Mistakes are simply a form of practice!"
"People who never make mistakes.....probably never do anything!"



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