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December 13, 2018, 03:27:20 am
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Tripoli question.

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Author Topic: Tripoli question.  (Read 525 times)
mdfa.ca
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« on: January 03, 2015, 02:49:34 pm »

I've been doing some research on the forum on how to better finish my sterling silver pieces and general consensus is to buff with tripoli, red rouge, zam and fabulustre, in that order. I have red rouge and found zam and fabulustre on my supplier's web site, but when I search for tripoli, I get quite a range of options:

1. tripoli by Vigor, peel tube
2. tripoli brown
3. platinum tripoli tan
4. tripoli platinum heavy cut
5. Tripoli Polishing Compound Fast Cutting for Removing Scratches

I also have "rouge wonder bar" peel tube. Where does that fit in the scheme of things?

It's a bit confusing. Which one is the correct one for sterling silver?
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Steve
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« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2015, 03:03:58 pm »

I have a bar of tripoli brown that's been in my inventory for a long time and I seldom use it because it is really aggressive and if one doesn't pay attention......welll.............

It is good for removing excessive fire scale.  If you do use it remember to wash the piece(s) completely as not to cross contaminate your finer grits.

Personally, I use a medium & fine satin wheel (like a 3M pad but round) to remove the majority of fire scale and then to fabuluster.  It works well for me with just those two steps.

But, like everything else in lapidary/metal smithing there are many ways to come up with the same end results............It's a personal preference.
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« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2015, 07:14:30 pm »

I'm a true believer of elbow grease.  I use micro finishing film (the abrasive grains are all the same size unlike sandpaper or sic) first 30, 15 than 9.  By the time you go to 9 micron the polish is a breeze.

http://www.riogrande.com/Product/3M-Imperial-Micro-Finishing-Films/337311?Pos=1
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« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2015, 11:37:49 am »

I have a bar of tripoli brown that's been in my inventory for a long time and I seldom use it because it is really aggressive and if one doesn't pay attention......welll.............

It is good for removing excessive fire scale.  If you do use it remember to wash the piece(s) completely as not to cross contaminate your finer grits.

Personally, I use a medium & fine satin wheel (like a 3M pad but round) to remove the majority of fire scale and then to fabuluster.  It works well for me with just those two steps.

Steve,

The medium and fine satin wheels, are they for a buffing station? I don't have a dedicated buffer, one that you stand on a workbench. Not sure what to call it. All I have is a dremel tool. Is there something equivalent I could use?

M
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« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2015, 11:39:09 am »

I'm a true believer of elbow grease.  I use micro finishing film (the abrasive grains are all the same size unlike sandpaper or sic) first 30, 15 than 9.  By the time you go to 9 micron the polish is a breeze.

http://www.riogrande.com/Product/3M-Imperial-Micro-Finishing-Films/337311?Pos=1

Helene,

thanks for the link. Though with my bad shoulders, it may be hard to use, sadly.... But something to think about.
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« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2015, 12:24:53 pm »

I have a bar of tripoli brown that's been in my inventory for a long time and I seldom use it because it is really aggressive and if one doesn't pay attention......welll.............

It is good for removing excessive fire scale.  If you do use it remember to wash the piece(s) completely as not to cross contaminate your finer grits.

Personally, I use a medium & fine satin wheel (like a 3M pad but round) to remove the majority of fire scale and then to fabuluster.  It works well for me with just those two steps.

Steve,

The medium and fine satin wheels, are they for a buffing station? I don't have a dedicated buffer, one that you stand on a workbench. Not sure what to call it. All I have is a dremel tool. Is there something equivalent I could use?

M

I searched Thunderbird's dremel tools and didn't find anything like a small satin wheel.  I use mine on a converted bench grinder that I use for polishing.  I've removed the grinding parts and attached the easy on/off spindle on both sides - http://www.thunderbirdsupply.com/productSearch.aspx?search=right/left%20motor%20spindles

Here are the satin wheels - http://www.thunderbirdsupply.com/productSearch.aspx?search=satin%20finish%20wheels
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« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2015, 12:44:51 pm »

Hey Steve:

I just took a look at the wheels. What type of arbor do they have? Looks like they use a taper threaded spin arbor.

Thanks in advance.

dickb
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« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2015, 01:25:57 pm »

I do not use silver clay but have finished a couple pieces for a friend. It takes a great polish. I have both the medium and fine buffing wheels for my Foredom. Can't remember where I purchased them though.............I think at a rock show. I use the hell out of the 3m Bristle Discs. They work very well. Purchased at Rio Grande.
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« Reply #8 on: January 04, 2015, 02:32:22 pm »

Hey Steve:

I just took a look at the wheels. What type of arbor do they have? Looks like they use a taper threaded spin arbor.

Thanks in advance.

dickb

My bench grinder (cheap Sears model) has a 1/2" shaft so I put on two 1/2" spindles - one for right side and one for left side - they are different in their spirals so the wheels don't spin off.
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« Reply #9 on: January 04, 2015, 02:46:05 pm »

I don't have an arbor or bench grinder so sadly those solutions won't work for me. It's on my wish list to get one in the future.

Mirkaba,

I do have the 3M disks, they are great!

But to return to my original question, which one of the tripoli listed is the best one to get?

M
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« Reply #10 on: January 04, 2015, 02:55:30 pm »

From your description I would go with number 5,  I assume it comes in brick form,  second choice would be number 1,  the platinum stuff will be high priced and not sure what else is added in. 

For a buffing compound that is even more aggressive on silver you might want to try bobbing compound,  I got mine from Rio, but Indian Jewelers and Monster Slayer also have it. 

Be sure to mark your buffs and keep them in a plastic bag when not on the buffer, and clean your pc between grits to avoid cross contamination of your buffing wheels.
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« Reply #11 on: January 04, 2015, 06:19:32 pm »

Thanks Steve, I'll have to get a couple now that I know they will fit my polisher.

Dickb
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« Reply #12 on: January 04, 2015, 09:16:58 pm »

Personally, I found the Grey Star to be the best. It is not greasy and leaves the silver or gold fairly clean after working it.
What you may not know is the most Tripolies and Rouges are made with pig fat. That is why they are so hard to clean up.
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« Reply #13 on: January 04, 2015, 09:44:18 pm »

Steve,

Would this work for the satin finish on a Dremel?

http://www.riogrande.com/Product/Mounted-Mini-Fiber-Wheels/338005?Pos=7
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« Reply #14 on: January 05, 2015, 12:14:01 am »

I polish a lot of metal on my knives - brass, nickel silver, stainless steel.   I only use one compound for everything.

K & G compound -

http://www.knifeandgun.com/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=ABKG

I use a scotch brite wheel for the rougher cleanup and then directly to the K & G.   I use muslin wheels for the first pass and cotton (flannel) for the final pass.  No contamination possible this way.
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