General information about the Site

This lapidary and jewelry design community forum is dedicated to the novice, more experienced, and expert lapidaries and jewelry designers.

Forum cabochon in the Spotlight

Bob ( bobby1 ) shared this unknown druzy

Forum Jewelry Design in the Spotlight

John shared this beautiful pair of amethyst cufflinks

Forum Jewelry Design in the Spotlight

Mick shared this beautiful Malachite Wrasse carving

Intarsias / Composites / Bead Making in the Spotlight

Kent shared this really nice Imperial Jasper pendant

Lapidary Related and Forum Member Shop Links

Brian Ababurko Silversmithing Classes / Rock Rollers Club

Dons Lapidary Arts

Idaho Rock Shop

Rare Rocks and Gems

Coyote Rainbow

Lightninghorse

Rocky Treasures

Talking Rocks

Fine Gem Designs

Idaho Rockman

Fine Woodwork and Lapidary

Darkstar Jewelry

DLC Gems

Teton Art Gallery

Art Cut Gems

Woman With A Torch

Lapidary Buy and Sell (Facebook Group)

Lapidary (Facebook Group)

Lapidary Equipment Marketplace (Facebook Group)


Lapidary / Gemstone Community Forum
December 11, 2018, 05:22:36 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
  Home Help Search Login Register  

Can't quite figure out corners for bezels? Help....

Pages: 1 2 [3]  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Can't quite figure out corners for bezels? Help....  (Read 1269 times)
Bentiron
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4426


« Reply #30 on: June 29, 2014, 07:43:11 pm »

You done good, very good indeed, I think you got it down now,AAA+ yippie
Report Spam   Logged

skystone
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 142


« Reply #31 on: July 01, 2014, 12:40:53 am »

Just went through this thread. The "new" pendant looks gtreat. Learning takes time & practice/experimentation. What Cowboy said about the saw dust is  one of the main reasons I use it too. The example B I cited was an "extreme" case & I've never heard of such. Traditionally on silver & Turq. native pieces. The stones were set on corn meal. It's a sacred thing but has the real world advantages Cowboy cited of saw dust. I've been setting stones with sawdust (sometimes corn meal) for 20+ years. I nearly always use 3/16 bezel except on very small pieces like earrings or rings then I'll use 1/8. I use 28 guage too not 30 to me it's too thin after polishing. The dif. in cost is neglegable.
Report Spam   Logged
Cowboy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 538



« Reply #32 on: July 04, 2014, 02:01:13 am »

I promised photos of the process for setting a cab with square corners. Here goes.

First, the empty bezel after polishing. You can see that the bezel will require straightening before I set the cab down into it.  No photos of that process, but it's as simple as using tht edge of the cab to push outward gently until the bezel corners are square and the sides are straight. Often, you can achieve this simply by turning the cab upside down, and gently pressing downward to force the sides outward.




Next, I fill the bezel cup with fine sawdust.  With thin cabs, I fill the cup to overflowing with loose sawdust. I use less for a thick cab.



Next, I press the sawdust down with my finger, and push in the bits that stick out the sides.




In the end, this is what I want: a cab that sits into the bezel cup just far enough that the bezel will push over against the sides of the cab, without pushing downward over the top. This prevents the trouble Billyazprospector experienced when he started this thread: you don't want to have to push the bezel over so far that it puckers in the corners, or anywhere else.  Getting the stone just deep enough, but not too deep, is the trick.  If you get it too deep, tap the back or side of the cup while holding it upside down until the cab pops out, then add some more sawdust. If you get it too shallow, remove the cab, remove a bit of the sawdust and try the fit again.  The perfect depth will vary a lot, depending on how the cab sides are tapered.  This is about perfect for this thin cab with a flattish dome:






Next, push the cab down into the sawdust, so that the sawdust compresses and pushes back upward against you. While you hold the cab down, use a bezel pusher to  push the corners inward first. Start right in the corner, and rock the tool outward away from the corner in each direction a small distance.  then move to the opposite corner and do the same. Now do the other two. You'll wind up with all four corners firmly set, and a loose bezel along the sides, like this:



Now, push the cab down against the compressed sawdust again, and set the bezel fully against the sides.  Now you have the perfect situation to avoid loose cabs:  the sawdust is compressed, pushing the cab upward, while the bezel holds it down. this cab is not the least bit loose.



POlish the piece, and you're done:










Report Spam   Logged
Rockrangers
Guest
« Reply #33 on: July 04, 2014, 02:28:50 am »

I enjoy reading and seeing these step by step this group tends to post on turning out such fine designs and thingamajiggers, done in various metals. I envy you guys and gals. Maybe when I retire"dreaming of future" I could find the time and get some hands on training-practice working with metals and the tools required...........plus a bigger workshop :)
Thanks again for posting these threads.
Report Spam   Logged
Carol M
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1028



« Reply #34 on: July 04, 2014, 09:22:40 am »

That is so cool, Cowboy,
Your tutorials are always so clear and 'calming'.  You make it look so easy.  Thank you. yippie

I love square corners and sharp points on cabs.  This works so fabulously on things like little boxes [that will probably stay dry].
My biggest fear, is that I mostly work on jewelry, like rings and things that might get wet. hide

After reading one post about jewelry that got smelly when it got wet, because the jeweler used some natural material to level it.....that was a big eye opener.  I never even thought of that.

How do you deal with square corners on things that might [or will] get wet??  and things where the bezel fits the stone and doesn't need filler?
Report Spam   Logged

Ciao,
Carol M
"Pursue Your Passions....."
"Imagine the Possibilities!"
"Mistakes are simply a form of practice!"
"People who never make mistakes.....probably never do anything!"

skystone
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 142


« Reply #35 on: July 04, 2014, 11:52:24 am »

Cowboy;s tute is exactly the same procedure I use. Carol that example of the saw dust geting wet & smelling. Was an extreme example & very possibly more due to the person's hygene than the sawdust. If you read carefully the wearer he said NEVER took it off. If the bezel is set firmly the material under the stone shouldn't actually get much moisture in it. Unless submerged for an extended period of time. The only thing I can think of that most people WOUNLDN"T take off when showering/bathing or swimming. Might be a ring, I certainly don't wear jewelry durring those times. But my wife & I have jewelry I made many years ago 20+ that were made like this & no problem. As I said before traditionally Navajo etc jewelry the stones are set in the same manner with Corn Meal.
Report Spam   Logged
Cowboy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 538



« Reply #36 on: July 04, 2014, 11:57:43 am »

That is so cool, Cowboy,
Your tutorials are always so clear and 'calming'.  You make it look so easy.  Thank you. yippie

I love square corners and sharp points on cabs.  This works so fabulously on things like little boxes [that will probably stay dry].
My biggest fear, is that I mostly work on jewelry, like rings and things that might get wet. hide

After reading one post about jewelry that got smelly when it got wet, because the jeweler used some natural material to level it.....that was a big eye opener.  I never even thought of that.

How do you deal with square corners on things that might [or will] get wet??  and things where the bezel fits the stone and doesn't need filler?

If your cab fits in the bezel without any need for filler behind it, the process would be pretty much the same, only it would be a bit harder to get the stone set so that it is tight in the bezel.

I almost never run into a setting where I don't use some sawdust backing. This results from the fact that I cut my cabs with a standard-height bevel on the edges. If the slab is thick enough to make the bevel taller, I cut it to the standard height anyway, and use the extra thickness to shape a higher dome. When I have extra stone to work with, I want that extra stone to show, I don't want to hide it down inside a bezel. I can't remember the last time I set a cabochon without sawdust. If I set a translucent or transparent stone, I use the sawdust, and then a disk of polished silver between the sawdust and the stone, so you don't see the sawdust through the stone.

As for smelly backing, it's a problem I have simply never observed. I wear rings and bracelets with sawdust backing that have been wet numerous times over the twenty years I've been making jewelry, and I've never noticed a bad smell.  I just asked my wife to smell them (my nose is practically useless). She didn't notice any odors at all.  I suspect that smelly backing might be more of a problem with certain woods, maybe, and if you swim in bacteria filled water.  Mine usually only get wet in the rain, or sometimes in the shower, or when I wash my hands, so there's not much bacteria load in the water. Some wood has properties that help fight odors, of course. Sandalwood and cedar come to mind. You might use them if you're concerned about bacteria. I have used oak sawdust exclusively through the years, collected when I sanded the floors in my house. So far so good after twenty years.  This thread is the first time I've ever heard someone suggest that backing a cab resulted in bad smells.

Report Spam   Logged
Carol M
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1028



« Reply #37 on: July 04, 2014, 11:20:28 pm »

Ah....well that's GREAT to know, Cowboy and Skystone.
I don't have any oak sawdust, but I have a neighbor whose a woodworker.  I may ask him to save me some.

Any sawdust you would NOT USE.  I mean any wood's sawdust, that you would NOT USE?
Report Spam   Logged

Ciao,
Carol M
"Pursue Your Passions....."
"Imagine the Possibilities!"
"Mistakes are simply a form of practice!"
"People who never make mistakes.....probably never do anything!"

skystone
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 142


« Reply #38 on: July 05, 2014, 12:58:39 pm »

No particular wood I can think of. Walnut maybe as it has it's own oder. I just use what ever saw dust cones frommy band saw or table saw. If table saw I sift it through some sceen to get the larger pieces out.  I just keep it in an old peanut can on my work bench with the plastic lid ready to use any time. It's about the size/consistency of corn meal not supper fine like sanding dust. I've on occasion had to remove a stone after I'd washed the rouge out of the details. I wash in water with a tooth brush & dunk in the water several times in the process. The saw dust really hasn't shown much soaking because the bezel is so tight against the stone. Very little gets in, so I'd think only maybe wearing while swimming & submerged for an extended periode might wet it. I just have never ever found it to be a problem in 20+ years of setting stones & very large stones weth more saw dust area at that LOL remember that some peoples skin type or oily skin & persperation can contribute possibly more to a piece having an odor than any stone backing. That's my suspision in the case BI gave since he said she "never" took the piece in question off.
Report Spam   Logged
Cowboy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 538



« Reply #39 on: July 05, 2014, 10:26:01 pm »

Ah....well that's GREAT to know, Cowboy and Skystone.
I don't have any oak sawdust, but I have a neighbor whose a woodworker.  I may ask him to save me some.

Any sawdust you would NOT USE.  I mean any wood's sawdust, that you would NOT USE?

Nope.  I doubt there's a lot of difference.  The only recommendation I would make is that I like finer sawdust best, from floor sanding, rather than sawdust from actually sawing something. The floor sander dust is fluffier, and compresses better. They both work, though.
Report Spam   Logged
Carol M
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1028



« Reply #40 on: July 06, 2014, 11:55:51 am »

Actually, we're having a crew in to take down a rather large Canadian maple tree that's grown [like a 'scrub tree'] on it's own, right beside our shared fence, and if we don't cut it, it'll wreck the fence.  My neighbor wants some of the wood for his fireplace, and we'll have some as well.
I may put a black garbage bag under where they cut it and see if I catch anything.
It may be too coarse though.

Maybe I should take a cup of the finest sawdust and put it in our Vitamix and pulverize it .  bricks Like you do with making flour or ground coffee.
Gives new meaning to 'add fiber to your smoothie. [giggle] ura
Report Spam   Logged

Ciao,
Carol M
"Pursue Your Passions....."
"Imagine the Possibilities!"
"Mistakes are simply a form of practice!"
"People who never make mistakes.....probably never do anything!"

gemfeller
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 621



WWW
« Reply #41 on: July 06, 2014, 01:39:45 pm »

I used to use sawdust and several other materials to raise cabs in closed-back settings.  But I was on deadline with a project one night and my sawdust box was empty.  I hurriedly looked for a substitute and noticed this thin plastic foam packing material.  It compresses like sawdust and provides "spring" against the bezel.  It doesn't get smelly and lasts a long, long time.  It's easy to find since it's widely used and it's free.  Just trim to size and use as many layers as needed.

Report Spam   Logged

Cowboy
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 538



« Reply #42 on: July 06, 2014, 10:58:50 pm »

I used to use sawdust and several other materials to raise cabs in closed-back settings.  But I was on deadline with a project one night and my sawdust box was empty.  I hurriedly looked for a substitute and noticed this thin plastic foam packing material.  It compresses like sawdust and provides "spring" against the bezel.  It doesn't get smelly and lasts a long, long time.  It's easy to find since it's widely used and it's free.  Just trim to size and use as many layers as needed.



That's a great idea!  That stuff does seem to have about the right amount of compression.
Report Spam   Logged


Pages: 1 2 [3]  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum | Buy traffic for your forum/website

Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy