General information about the Site

This lapidary and jewelry design community forum is dedicated to the novice, more experienced, and expert lapidaries and jewelry designers.

Forum cabochon in the Spotlight

Bob ( bobby1 ) shared this unknown druzy

Forum Jewelry Design in the Spotlight

John shared this beautiful pair of amethyst cufflinks

Forum Jewelry Design in the Spotlight

Mick shared this beautiful Malachite Wrasse carving

Intarsias / Composites / Bead Making in the Spotlight

Kent shared this really nice Imperial Jasper pendant

Lapidary Related and Forum Member Shop Links

Brian Ababurko Silversmithing Classes / Rock Rollers Club

Dons Lapidary Arts

Idaho Rock Shop

Rare Rocks and Gems

Coyote Rainbow

Lightninghorse

Rocky Treasures

Talking Rocks

Fine Gem Designs

Idaho Rockman

Fine Woodwork and Lapidary

Darkstar Jewelry

DLC Gems

Teton Art Gallery

Art Cut Gems

Woman With A Torch

Lapidary Buy and Sell (Facebook Group)

Lapidary (Facebook Group)

Lapidary Equipment Marketplace (Facebook Group)


Lapidary / Gemstone Community Forum
December 10, 2018, 09:05:33 am
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
  Home Help Search Login Register  

Can't quite figure out corners for bezels? Help....

Pages: [1] 2 3  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Can't quite figure out corners for bezels? Help....  (Read 1269 times)
billyazprospector
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 75


« on: June 23, 2014, 07:44:43 pm »

So, I recently decided I would try my hand at doing some pendant settings with my stones and I cannot get the corners down? What am I doing wrong? A little harder then just circles....


Report Spam   Logged

Helene
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2007



WWW
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2014, 08:48:47 pm »

Doing bezels can be tricky.  Below are tips that I find are helpful.

1.  Make sure bezel is pure silver (it's softer)
2.  If bezel is too high it will be difficult to bend over the stone.  It needs to be high enough to hold the stone securely, but not too much more. When it is too high the metal will not be able to compress enough and has nowhere to go but crinkle.

3.  Use your bezel pusher by rocking from the bottom up.   You do this a little at a time.  Don't work in one spot but move to opposite sides of the stone a bit at a time, this way you do not get those kinks, especially in the corner.

4.  Sharp edges are the hardest, so be careful with them.  On your piece I would have started at the three corners working them over the stone slowly.  Sometimes I even file the outside of the bezel at the corners slightly thinner so it will bend easier over those sharp corners.  Remember be careful with the filing.  Light touch.  You don't want to file too thin.

I think you are on the right track.  It takes practice.  The top left corner looks like it can be fixed easily with a little bit of work.  I would try try to push the bezel out a bit on the right and bottom.  I think you could practice on this piece a bit more and you might end up being pleased with the results.

I hope this helps.  I know there are many tutorials online that will help and other members with their tips.
Report Spam   Logged

bobby1
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3606


« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2014, 08:51:17 pm »

I use a bezel rocker to set all of my bezel set stones. I can't get the appropriate pressure with a burnisher. What you are doing is  starting in the middle of the bezel and pushing towards the corner and the excess metal bunches up there. Start at the center of the corner and push the metal away from the corner towards the center of the side bezels. Go back to the center of the corner and push the metal in the opposite direction  toward the other side bezel. Then start pushing the center of the side bezels down slightly. Do the same on all the sides. go back and do the corner pushes, then back to the sides.
In each sequence only push the bezel down about 1/4 of the way. On the next round push the various areas about 1/4 of the way, next 1/4 and finally all the way down. The concentration is to always be pushing the excess metal away from the corners.
A lot of people cut a slot in the corner because they don't understand how to push the metal away from the corners. I think it doesn't look good to have the cuts in the corners.
Bob
Report Spam   Logged

Helene
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2007



WWW
« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2014, 08:55:07 pm »

Thanks Bob you explained it much better.
Report Spam   Logged

lopacki
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 176



« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2014, 10:16:52 am »

Billy,
It looks to me that you are not making your bezel first and then soldering it to your back plate. If so this is the main problem. I always make all of my bezels around all of the stones prior to doing any soldering.

I have attached an image of a 33 stone row bracelet I made sometime in the late eighties or early nineties, on this piece I made a form for all of the bezels and also a template for the cabs, the bracelet was made first flat without the bezels after bending and shaping all of the bezels were then soldered in place.

Hope this helps you out.

All my best ........... Danny


* multi.jpg (49.86 KB, 681x600 - viewed 8 times.)
Report Spam   Logged
Carol M
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1028



« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2014, 11:17:38 am »

Hi Billy,
Danny's image of his bezel's is, BTW, an awesome job of bezel setting, but also serves as a good example of another thing that I'd definitely try.

When I look at your bezel height, and the curve of the cab, I know you'd find it WAY easier, and less 'clumpy' if your bezel were shorter [less high up the side].  It's hard to tell scale from the image but it looks like you could have made the whole bezel 0.5mm or 1mm shorter.

This may not sound like much but if you think about it, the higher the silver goes above the girdle, the more distance it has to travel to fold over the cab, and the more silver you have to 'find a home for'.

I'm becoming increasing impressed by how little metal is needed to secure a stone smoothly.

Some people [like Lexi Erickson even do designs that are part bezel and part prong settings (especially when there's a ragged edge detail she likes) and they look great].
http://www.interweavestore.com/metalsmith-essentials-setting-stones-with-bezels


Report Spam   Logged

Ciao,
Carol M
"Pursue Your Passions....."
"Imagine the Possibilities!"
"Mistakes are simply a form of practice!"
"People who never make mistakes.....probably never do anything!"

MrsWTownsend
Guest
« Reply #6 on: June 24, 2014, 01:08:19 pm »

Beautiful stone!  All the answers you need are definitely here; shorter bezel height & work from the corners out are the two biggies.
Report Spam   Logged
Bentiron
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4426


« Reply #7 on: June 24, 2014, 04:44:28 pm »

Yeah, start with the corners first, shorter bezel and it will all come out better. You can take the stone out of that one and file that bezel down and fix it and it will look wonderful. Have fun by all means, we  have all been there yes
Report Spam   Logged

billyazprospector
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 75


« Reply #8 on: June 24, 2014, 07:09:37 pm »

Thank you ALL for the replies! I didn't even think about a smaller bezel.  I also am trying to remember if my old jewelry teacher told me about starting at the corners first but it was years ago. Anyway I did NOT start at the corners while doing this so for sure that's an issue. I think I will hit up the supply shop this weekend for smaller bezel and give it another once over and try it out! I will let you know how it turns out! Thanks so much all....
Report Spam   Logged

Helene
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2007



WWW
« Reply #9 on: June 24, 2014, 08:09:55 pm »

All you need to do is file the bezel down to the height it needs to be.

I got a lot of information from a book titled Creative Stonesetting.

He even discusses how he alters tools, such as the bezel pusher to work better.  Lots of illustrations to show exactly the height of bezel to stone.

http://www.amazon.com/Creative-Stonesetting-John-Cogswell/dp/1929565224/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1403662076&sr=1-4&keywords=jewelry+settings
Report Spam   Logged

bilquest
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 203



« Reply #10 on: June 24, 2014, 09:19:19 pm »

If you don't want to file the bezel, you can always raise the stone. Trace the stone on a piece of cardboard and cut to shape, then drop the cutout into the bezel cup before the stone. The thickness of the cardboard may demand more than one 'shim' to get the stone where you want it. I've also known people to use sawdust to raise the stone.
Report Spam   Logged
Hummingbirdstones
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1282



WWW
« Reply #11 on: June 25, 2014, 07:42:42 am »

Even better is using the plastic lids from containers (coffee, sour cream, etc.) to make the shims.  Moisture can get in underneath the stone and saw dust and cardboard will eventually deteriorate.
Report Spam   Logged

Robin

" border="0
RockIt2Me
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 680


"Rock It 2 Me!"


« Reply #12 on: June 25, 2014, 07:44:18 am »

I save hotel card keys for this purpose.
Report Spam   Logged

Nancie
"Rock It 2 Me"
Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle.   

 Don't take life so seriously...It's not like you're going to get out alive ;-)                                                        



GregHiller
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 185


North of Boston


« Reply #13 on: June 25, 2014, 09:38:07 am »

>If you don't want to file the bezel, you can always raise the stone. Trace the stone on a piece of cardboard and cut to shape, then drop the cutout into the bezel cup before the stone. The thickness of the cardboard may demand more than one 'shim' to get the stone where you want it. I've also known people to use sawdust to raise the stone.<

Rather than cardboard, sawdust or plastic bits, I've had extremely good luck with thick electrical tape.  I'm not even sure it's called this, but I've picked it up at Home Depot.  As a backing it works particularly well because it is somewhat flexible and compressible and sticks to the stone (very convenient).  I put a piece on the back of a stone and cut it to shape with a razor blade or sissors.  You can use more than one layer if you like.  This makes it easy to get a good fit of your stone and less likely for there to be any wobble when the stone is finally in place.

I have recently had a problem with semi-transparent stones.  Here the sliverwork underneath needs to be near perfect and perfectly uniform, easy to accomplish on a flat piece, but very annoying to try and get in the bottom of a cab cup.  I might start using white plastic tape for this when I want the backround to be pure white and reflect back a lot of light.  I've heard some people use old CD's for this, but it seems like a lot more work than just cutting tape with a razor blade. 
Report Spam   Logged

'Relax it's just a freakin' rock (insert name of interest) forum' - immortal words of a 'sage' from the fish forum I used to run

Always interested in trading slabs or rough
dickb
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 837



« Reply #14 on: June 25, 2014, 12:32:33 pm »

On transparent stones, you might try silver reflective mylar film that can be bought at craft stores. Just put the mylar first so the light is reflected back through the stone, then add your backfill to bring the stone up to the right height. It works better that CD disks and cuts a lot easier.

Good Luck!

Dickb
Report Spam   Logged

Elegance in Jewelry
69 Retired and Free
GPAA, PLP - Blackhawk G&MC, CVR&MS
Eastern Iowa, Clover SC



Pages: [1] 2 3  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum | Buy traffic for your forum/website

Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy