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Fiber brick?

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Author Topic: Fiber brick?  (Read 355 times)
gingerkid_2k14
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« on: June 13, 2014, 02:31:47 pm »

Hi, y'all!  This is probably a stupid question(s)....I have a fiber brick and wondered if it serves the same purpose or is it the same as a firing brick?   dunno

Many thanks!!
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lithicbeads
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« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2014, 04:39:15 pm »

 What is the number embossed in the brick?
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gingerkid_2k14
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« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2014, 08:58:46 pm »

Hi, lithicbeads, and thank you! 

I don't see a number embossed in the brick, but the fiber brick is still in the bag that has a printed label from Art Clay World of F-081.   

Just opened the bag and now have stuff from the brick on my shirt and laptop. lol.   
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Hummingbirdstones
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« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2014, 09:19:53 pm »

See here:

http://www.artclayworld.com/prod-550.htm
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Robin

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lithicbeads
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« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2014, 09:30:44 pm »

The dust from the brick is more dangerous than any , repeat any , lapidary material.You want to clean it up with wet paper towels  put them in a baggie for the garbage. If you are going to be doing silver work you need to ask the metal folks here about refractory bricks to work on . Some clay insulating materials are wildly dangerous, inhalation and skin risk.
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gingerkid_2k14
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« Reply #5 on: June 13, 2014, 10:12:28 pm »

Thank you for the link, Robin.

Thank you for the heads up on the fiber brick, Frank.  Now I'm worried since I managed to get it all over my shirt and laptop.  There's an MSDS sheet for the fiber brick that I'll read asap. 

May I ask about the refractory bricks in this forum, or do I need to ask in another forum? 

Wow, just skimmed the MSDS and guess the fiber brick needs to go into the garbage...
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itsandbits1
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« Reply #6 on: June 13, 2014, 10:22:42 pm »

sounds nasty but if used under "controlled" conditions should be safe. Just have to be aware and take adequate industrial safety measures
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« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2014, 10:48:07 pm »

The fiber brick can be used for firing as a firing brick, but I highly suggest using it outside with proper ventilation, protective eye wear and some kind of particle mask.
I don't suggest doing any metal clay firing inside as even though the organic binders in the clay are supposed to be non-toxic, you really don't want to be breathing in the smoke from that stuff burning off.
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Isotelus
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« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2014, 07:14:58 pm »

Solid fiber brick should pose no problems, however the dust and loose fiber is very bad if inhaled. As lithic said damp clean up bag the the dust and particles and dispose of them. I have worked around alumina ceramic fiber batting and brick with precautions against dust and have had no bad effects and that includes three kilns built using the material.

Work Safe--- Not Stupid
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Bryan
gingerkid_2k14
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« Reply #9 on: August 04, 2014, 10:24:09 am »

I greatly appreciate everyone's suggestions, especially concerning safety issues!  I purchased one of the honeycomb bricks and wondered if anyone has used one and their experiences with it.  Also have a non-asbestos (?) magnesia block.  Feel as if I'm hoarding these brick things, rofl. hide
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Isotelus
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« Reply #10 on: August 06, 2014, 08:10:59 am »

As I write this all of the soldering brick you mention and others are beside my bench for easy access. I tend to switch to whatever helps with the job I am working.

The honey comb types are good heat reflectors and good all around flat surface for soldering.

Magnesia ( very soft brick or tile ) usually soft and easy to place pins or such to position work for soldering. It will take a lot of heat for those working platinum group metals. For those metals keep a separate block used just for them to avoid contamination.

I also keep quite a few old fashioned charcoal soldering blocks. The reduction atmosphere they provide under the torch can be very useful for working silver
and fusing and granule making.
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Bryan


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