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June 17, 2019, 01:36:40 am
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Preferred cabbing wheels

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Author Topic: Preferred cabbing wheels  (Read 752 times)
Kent
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« on: March 03, 2014, 09:01:48 am »

I inherited quite a bit of gear that I used to use as a kid and am back to cutting, shaping and polishing, collecting, ect....

Part of the set up for cabbing  consists of a Dyclad hard diamond 180 wheel which has a surface that resembles a knife sharping stone...a dot pattern. I find the pattern tends to catch occasionally and break off a chip...kinda frustrating. Cuts well but...

Next in line is a 600 grit hard diamond then I recently purchased Covington's  diamond resin soft  wheels in 1200 and 3000 grit. I not entirely convinced this is the right setup for general cabbing. Making a cab yesterday I thought I was done with the 600 grit, went to the 1200 and after a bit of work discovered I still had a fair amount of tiny facets/scratches and the 1200 was not gritty enough to smooth things out. I don't think its a lack a patience....

What are you all's preferences for wheels ? Hard diamond, expando sandpaper, the ole  Silicon Carbide ..?

I know, lots of variables.....



   
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lithicbeads
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« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2014, 10:10:21 am »

A 220 diamond hard and soft wheel would get you near a standard progression . The most important sanding wheel to me is a diamond 600 grit  also. An expando with sic belts would work well also but a 220 hard wheel would still be needed.
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Kent
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« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2014, 10:18:19 am »

Are you suggesting using both a hard and soft 220 in the process?

I'm referencing Covington's catolog: They have a 220 hard disc but I only see a 280 grit diamond resin soft. Perhaps a working transistion.....

Thanks for the advise

Kent
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PhilNM
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« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2014, 10:18:48 am »

so you're gong 180 to 600 to 1300 to 3000? whew, tough progression.  You need a 280 or 320 to take out those 180 scratches.
typical progression is something like this: 100, 220, 400, 600, 1200, 3000.
grinding and shaping is anything below 400, pre-polishing is 600 and polishing is anything above. Your scratches should be all gone before you go to any polishing stage.
Diamond is much easier and faster, but SiC is lots cheaper in the short run.
I do hard diamond 100 and 220, then soft diamond for everything else.
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Justin
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« Reply #4 on: March 03, 2014, 11:14:06 am »

When I was setting up my cabbing machine I called Diamond Pacific about replacing the suggeested 280 grit soft epoxy wheel with a 300 grit hard diamond. They told me that was a bad idea because I would spend way too much time on the next 600 grit wheel to get those scratches out.  He explained that the 280 wheel is the workhorse for scratch removal that gets ready for the rest of the  polish. After using their suggested set up for two years I'd say they are right. You may want to consider losing the 600 grit hard diamond and getting a soft 600 and 280.

Justin
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dickb
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« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2014, 01:49:06 pm »

Ok Phil:

Say you go with 100 & 220 hard diamond wheels, then follow up the chain with the same grits (400, 600, 1200, 3000) on an expando wheel. Would that help him keep his initial costs down with similiar results and final finish?

Just thinking out loud here. Six diamond wheels at once would be tough for a lot of folks.

Dickb
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johnjsgems
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« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2014, 02:46:28 pm »

Most would find 180 too mild and would grind with either 80 or 100 and finish shaping with 220.  Then the 280, 600, 1200, 3000 soft wheels (or belts in 400, 600, 1200, 3000).  You definitely need something between 180 and 600.
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Kent
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« Reply #7 on: March 03, 2014, 03:07:24 pm »

Sounds like what I suspected is too large a jump between my 180 hard diamond and my 600 hard diamond. I like the idea of removing facets from grinding on a soft wheel. I don't push overly hard but I have to think the softness does help to contribute to a fair/smooth surface. I think I'll order a 280 diamond resin wheel from Covingtopn and see how that transistion goes. Still may have to consider a 220 hard diamond though....

Anyone have experience with service life of the diamond resin wheels ?

Cheers,

Kent
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PhilNM
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« Reply #8 on: March 03, 2014, 05:05:35 pm »

Ok Phil:

Say you go with 100 & 220 hard diamond wheels, then follow up the chain with the same grits (400, 600, 1200, 3000) on an expando wheel. Would that help him keep his initial costs down with similiar results and final finish?

Just thinking out loud here. Six diamond wheels at once would be tough for a lot of folks.

Dickb

He could.... but how many $$ will be spent on SiC belts in the time it woud take to wear out a diamond wheel? I'd just fill in the blanks till the odd grits are wore out. Not really that much difference between say a 180 and a 220, you know? But I would sell the 600 hard and stick with soft from 400 up.
Either Covington's or Kingsley's for the best prices on wheels that last.
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PhilNM
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« Reply #9 on: March 03, 2014, 05:12:15 pm »


Anyone have experience with service life of the diamond resin wheels ?

Cheers,

Kent


Your mileage may vary... Each user gets different results. And a newbie tends to wear them out faster than an experienced diamond wheel user. That's why I learned to convert my expando's and thumpers to diamond. They'll probably last me the rest of my lifetime the way I made them. I find it hard o go back to a narrow 1 inch or even a 1.5 inch wheel after getting spoiled on my 3 inch wide home-mades!

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slabbercabber
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« Reply #10 on: March 03, 2014, 05:30:07 pm »

My setup is 80  and 220 hard then 100, 340, 600, 1500, 5000, 15,000 belts.  The 100 is my workhorse.  It takes the 220 hard wheel scratches down super fast.  It also does yoeman work for windowing.  I wouldn't be without it.
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bobby1
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« Reply #11 on: March 03, 2014, 06:02:43 pm »

My progression is a slightly worn 100 grit diamond wheel, well worn 100 grit diamond wheel, moderately worn 220 grit S/C expando, 400 grit S/C expando, worn 600 grit S/C expando and to polish. I work hard and abuse my S/C belts and they last me about 6 or 7 years. I only throw them away when the seam splits (very rare).
Bob
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Kent
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« Reply #12 on: March 03, 2014, 06:22:06 pm »

huhh...windowing ...?
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Hummingbirdstones
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« Reply #13 on: March 03, 2014, 07:05:49 pm »

Windowing is grinding or sanding the rind off a stone so you can see what it looks like inside. 
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« Reply #14 on: March 04, 2014, 03:24:40 am »

Have to agree with the general view 80/100 & 200 hard diamond followed by 300 600 1200 soft diamond and then there is a number of choices 3000, 8000, 14000 at my club we even go out to 50,000.

Once you are set up the maintenance can be low cost, I have been refurbishing my club wheels for some time now and am very happy with the result http://gemstone.smfforfree4.com/index.php/topic,4184.60.html
My only drawback is the color of paint used may need to go neutral/clear. The paint color has infused to a minor level one or two porous stones. 
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