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January 20, 2019, 02:02:20 pm
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Minimum bits for carving? And recommended?

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Author Topic: Minimum bits for carving? And recommended?  (Read 890 times)
Michellek1123
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« on: February 02, 2014, 07:46:35 am »

Hi all :)
I'm going to the store to get a foredom SR next Monday!! Yay! Lol

It comes with flex shaft, rotary hanger and

*1 PC Drums sander with 1/8" shank, for 1/2" x 1/2" sanding Bands  (not sure which kind)

*1 PC Drums sander with 1/8" shank, for 1/4" x 1/2" sanding Bands (also no sure)

*1 pc sanding disc wheel 1/8"

*1 pc screw Mandel for felt polishing accessories

*1 pc collets

*1 pc polishing compound

*1 pc dressing stone

* 10 pcs 1-1/4" fiberglass reinforced cut-off wheels accessories

*10 pcs felt polishing wheels

*5 pcs 1" sic

*5 pcs 1/2" sic

*5 pcs felt polishing tip

*25 pcs cut-off wheels

*11pcs grinding wheels with 1/8" shank

*6pcs Hss cuter ( what is this? )

*3 pcs nylon brush 1/8" shank

*3 pcs copper brush 1/8" shank

As well as 11 pieces each of SIC  1/2" x1/2". And 1/4"x1/4"
 

Because the shop isn't close, I'd prefer it if I could buy the bits in one go.  Please tell me the types you all use the most wt their respective grits, sizes, etc.

Planning to practise on beach stone, then marble, then granite, then jaspers and agates......  see where I can go. ^^ lol money is an issue so only quartz is likely sooner. But I also have some end cuts of jadeite.

All advise welcome!

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-Michelle

asianfire
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« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2014, 08:18:35 am »

Looks like a good starter kit.

Get a cheap set of burrs too. They come usually in different shapes and sizes in sets of 20 or 25 (sorry cant give you grit as I buy on sight, and there is never any grit stipulated).

Once you got all those things, its time for trail and error. In due process, you will find out what you prefer and where you need more. If the shop is too far to get to regularly; you will be able to order online from one of your suppliers or FleaBay.
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« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2014, 10:28:53 am »

You'll find that you become creative with the bits you have, and you will either find ways to make them work for the design in your imagination, or you may alter the design slightly as you find that your available tools won't produce the cuts you imagine.

One thing I find useful is to always buy a specific shape of grinding tool in both a coarse and a finer grit. It would be discouraging to find that you can carve an interesting design element with your coarse burr, and then find that you have no way to smoothe it before polishing, because you lack that same burr in a finer grit.

You may also want to experiment with making your own burrs out of wooden toothpicks, dowels or matchsticks for the final sanding and polishing processes. You can use wooden burrs with loose grit to sand and polish tight areas in a carving where standard polishing tools have difficulty fitting.  Keep the tool speeds slow when you use wood, though. Faster speeds will cause the wooden tool to disintegrate, and faster speeds will also fling the abrasive slurries off the tool.
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« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2014, 10:47:12 am »

What KK and cowboy said but IMHO start with a softer stone like marble or nephrite because it works a little faster and there is less chance of getting discouraged. Also, start with something easy like an abstract or mushroom because they go quicker and you will see your results in a shorter amount of time. You will be surprised at how many people like an abstract polished rock when you show it around.

Good luck and have fun with it. Carving can be like meditating and when you stop you will wonder where the time went.
Jim
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Michellek1123
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« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2014, 03:50:35 am »

  Thank you!
  Cowboy, what is a matchstick burr? @@ please do tell. and how does one fit it in?
   Marble it will be.   And a random set of burrs...   
  I'm not even expecting a 'shape' the first time.   hide

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-Michelle
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« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2014, 04:30:11 am »

Hi Michelle
All the above advice is spot on. If you start off with a cheap set of burs you will soon find out which shapes work for you and your style then you can invest in better/different ones. Marble will give you a result fast which is nice.

Beads and small pendants can be great introduction to carving.

Now you will forever be on the lookout for nice solid rough.

David
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asianfire
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« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2014, 07:19:49 am »

    Cowboy, what is a matchstick burr? @@ please do tell.


Time flies, its the sign of time, when people having a hard time recognizing the things we grew up with.  toofunny11 Before lighters there where matches. In a box you got/had a number of matchsticks.  toofunny12  chuckle

If you got access to bamboo, sticks made out of it, fitting your hand-piece will work well too with slurry. Actually, a lot of finishing and fine grinding here in asian backyards are done without slurry/abrasives as the bamboo has lots of minerals in it that will act as abrasive (but takes longer).
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mirkaba
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« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2014, 07:24:35 am »

I get the most mileage out of the 90 grit diamond bits and various size wheels when roughing things out. Less expensive sets can be found on Ebay.
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Debbie K
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« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2014, 07:29:47 am »

Michelle:

Get some inexpensive bits like these http://www.harborfreight.com/20-piece-1-8-eighth-inch-shank-diamond-point-set-40547.html. Also, if you have a dentist friend, ask for their old diamond or tungsten carbide drill bits. I got my start with a bunch of these, I just soaked them in a water bleach solution to make sure I didn't infect myself with some horrid disease.

If you order anything from a place like Harbor Freight, get these too: http://www.harborfreight.com/10-piece-diamond-grit-needle-file-set-69876.html. I can't tell you how much you'll end up using these hand files. They're pretty coarse (60-100 grit), and you might want to get a honing stone (for knifes) to help smooth out the scratches they will leave.

You can make your own bits out of brass or copper rods (I use brass, because it doesn't bend as much as the copper does). I built a holder for the handpiece of my rotary tool and used files to shape the rods. These are then used with oil (I use mineral oil, the olive oil will go rancid) and diamond grit. You make multiples of each tool as you have grits. I have 6 grits, I make 6 identical tools. You can't cross contaminate the tools with grit. I keep them in separate boxes. I also use toothpicks, corn-cob holders and dowel to make bits. They're also used with oil and diamond. You can use pumice powders, but they work a lot slower.

Since you're new to carving, I'd like to direct you to this link http://gemstone.smfforfree4.com/index.php/topic,10926.0.html. A bunch of us contributed to it in terms of what we use, what works, what we make, etc.

When I started carving stone, I had a Dremel, some Dremel diamond burs, some Mizzy stones, some rubber abrasive burs (like jewelers use), some dental burs and some sanding burs. That's all I had for years and it worked pretty well for me. The important thing is to just get started. If you look at my Picasa page
https://picasaweb.google.com/deborahkirkpatrick56 almost half of the things there were done with these tools.

Good luck, and if I can help you, let me know.

Debbie K

P.S. You do know that you have to carve stone wet, don't you?
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« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2014, 07:44:56 am »

Just a lot of good info here gang. tks
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« Reply #10 on: February 03, 2014, 09:39:33 am »

I have an excess of Dremel (1/8" shank) stone burrs. I will be glad to stick 6 in and envelop and send them out. I have enough to furnish 5 'sets'. The first 5 people who PM me (emails don't count) will get them. There will be no insurance or tracking #, so please let me know when you get them.   Teddy
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Michellek1123
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« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2014, 06:14:40 am »

That's a lot of help.

My summary:
Get a cheap set of burrs, preferably in lower grits, to find out what works to get shapes. If it works, replicate those tools in multiple grits.

Depending on time and money, make bamboo burrs /other wood burrs, with /without slurries.

Asianfire, are the bamboo burrs used fresh or dry or dry with water? Stupid question alert!

Debbie, thank you. I'm planning to dip the piece in water regularly as I'm going to be
handling small pieces. You have very nice work! What are the figurines made with?

- Michelle
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-Michelle
Debbie K
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« Reply #12 on: February 05, 2014, 08:26:58 am »

Michelle:

Each photo has a description of what kind of rock or gemstone they are carved from. The metal figures are bronze or silver. I carve the waxes and do lost wax casting.

The metal burs with slurry or oil and diamond will cut faster than the bamboo or wood ones will.

I like to use a bowl of water and dip my pieces, too. I only go to the drip system when I'm carving something large and need a higher volume of water. I don't use water when I use the oil and diamond.

The softer stones (marble, howelite, turquoise, prehnite, fluorite) are nicer stones to carve to begin with as they are a little easier to polish without investing in diamond powder. You can polish softer stones with sandpaper; automotive stores often carry the higher grits.

Debbie K
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Michellek1123
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« Reply #13 on: February 06, 2014, 12:21:13 am »

Debbie,
sorry I missed the captions for your work materials.
And turquoise will put me in the poorhouse trying to get good stuff, I expect. help


All,
Thank you.


- Michelle.
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-Michelle
asianfire
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« Reply #14 on: February 06, 2014, 01:44:02 am »

As I got a ready supply of bamboo growing around me, I cut them directly from the bush (so to speak).  But I do take death ones. The fresh green ones wear down way to quickly. In your case, dont throw the chopstick that come with your Chinese takeaway. :)
Thats sturdy stuff and they sure are straight already. Just need to cut to size. :)
For smaller stuff, to get into small spaces, I often just use Tooth-picks.
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Michellek1123
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« Reply #15 on: February 06, 2014, 08:53:21 am »

Asianfire!
Lol I'm Chinese. I have a ready supply of day to day use chopsticks, from lacquered to straight from the bush cuts.   

XD

When you say straight from the bush, I'm thinking those small, 3mm diameter ones? Or super thick cut to size?
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« Reply #16 on: February 06, 2014, 06:40:23 pm »

Never tried thin branches, would be hard to get the size for your hand-piece right.

No I take bigger pieces and then split them till I get the size I can use.
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Michellek1123
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« Reply #17 on: February 06, 2014, 08:38:59 pm »

Oh...... I'll stick to chopsticks.   ......

Thank you and haveaniceday2
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-Michelle
Michellek1123
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« Reply #18 on: May 08, 2014, 07:29:22 am »

More appreciated advise from a different topic on polishing
Michelle:

I use wood and brass points  that I have made myself to polish along with diamond powder and oil. I initially use the commercial diamond points for roughing out and then I use 200, 600, 1200, 3000 and 8000 grit with my handmade bits. This is a picture of the 600 grit bits. Some of them are nails or brass escutcheon pins, some are wooden toothpicks or corn cob holders, some are hand-turned brass or wood. I also made some felt wheels that are impregnated with epoxy, fumed silica (which acts as an extender) and diamond powder. I make the same style bit for every grit.

Before I had the diamond powder, I used sandpaper and jeweler's rubber polishing points. The rubber points are impregnated with grit and you can get them in about 4 different grits. It worked okay on softer (Mohs 6 or softer) stones, but for jaspers, agates and jades the diamond works a lot better. I understand that you've got problems getting supplies where you are; you can find some of the sandpaper at automotive stores in really fine grits; they use it for detail work.

I have tried everything I can think of to polish, and I encourage you to do the same. You never know what might work; I even found some plants incorporate fine silica into their cell structure and once they dry you can use them to sand. I have tried dried trumpet vine with limited success, and I've heard that some grapevine works well.

Hardware stores in the US used to standardly carry Pumice Powder, Rottenstone and sometimes French polish, primarily for wood-finishing. These are pretty fine grit and can be used for polishing; I made a paste of them with water.

Also, don't overlook the stones that are usually included in Dremel type kits; some of these are pretty fine and do a good job for pre-finishing. They are capable of being shaped to fit a carving, as you use them they will begin to conform to the space you're using them on.

Hope this helps. You carving is looking good!

Debbie K
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-Michelle


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