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December 10, 2018, 08:30:15 am
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Saw Handle

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Author Topic: Saw Handle  (Read 670 times)
SILVERNUGGET
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« on: January 09, 2014, 07:35:04 pm »

Who has modified their saw handle to better fit their hand?
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Rockoteer
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« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2014, 05:19:47 am »


Like in 'handsaw' or 'hacksaw'?
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SILVERNUGGET
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« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2014, 06:27:12 am »

a jewelers saw
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Bentiron
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« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2014, 02:52:45 pm »

I haven't, been using the one saw since I first got it nearly fifty years ago and the other for thirty years. Some I know have turned new handles on a wood lathe and other have used a product call "Jett Set" or maybe it only has one "t", I just don't remember right off, but it is a thermoplastic that comes in pellets and it you heat in hot water and make it conform to your grip and mold to the handle of your saw. I just haven't felt the need to change the handle on my saw, I don't have a problem with sawing to the line nor excessive breakage, I actually wear blades out and need to replace them before they break.
While speaking of broken saw blades, I have made a shapes container out of a plastic soda pop bottle. I rinsed it out and let it dry, then screwed the lid on tight, drilled a 1/4" hole through that and now dispose of my broken and dull saw blades in there. I do this because my wife ran a broken blade into her finger while emptying my trash one day, needles to say she was not happy, so this was my solution to keep her, the dogs and the children safe from broken sections of blades. Be safe, these small sections of blades are like needles and need to be disposed of in safer manner than just thrown in the trash. bricks
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bobby1
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« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2014, 04:15:51 pm »

I find the original shape of my saw handle is perfect (for me).
When I teach silver or goldsmithing classes I have a specific session on inserting the blade followed by how to hold the saw. Most people grip the handle with a death grip thus they quickly have fatigue, muscle cramps and ultimately will develop tendonitis or carpal tunnel syndrome. I can always tell which students have that death grip by the sound of their sawing activity. I  hear a RUK, RUK RUK sound it shows that they are forcing the saw through the metal with the death grip on the handle. I teach them the proper chair height and grip on the saw. I have them adjust the chair so that their elbow to hand height is parallel to the floor. I have them grip the saw in their fingers not with their palm. While holding the saw in their fingers I tell them NOT to actively push the saw forward but to guide it forward with rapid up and down strokes. If they need to make a turn, keep it moving rapidly up and down and either rotate the saw with their fingertips or rotate the metal. The sawing sound is a gentle zip, zip zip noise.
Also when cutting along a line I tell them to look slightly in front of the blade not where they are or have been. This leads to a straighter cut or a better following of the curved lines.
Sorry for such a long explanation.
Bob
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liz
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« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2014, 05:08:03 pm »

Your explanation was very helpful, I'm glad you made it.

liz
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Bentiron
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« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2014, 03:49:14 pm »

Bob is right, don't treat your jewelers saw like a hack saw. It is more about the weight of the saw frame doing the cutting than you pulling the blade through the metal, you job is to guide the path of the blade. There was a fellow on TV awhile back explaining golf and his contention was that it took 10,000 swings to perfect each of the different strokes, well that's kinda true about a lot of things, shooting a pistol well or using a jewelers saw frame, it takes a lot of practice to do it well. A friend of mine bought one of those new Kool Saws for some $65 because his old one just didn't saw all that well. I took his old one and he his new saw and I still out did him, it's not always the tool but the hand behind it, I'm not saying that his new frame isn't wonderful or worth the price, it is, but a new tool ain't magic, it will not replace practice.
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bobby1
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« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2014, 08:09:13 pm »

I've seen those new saws with the enormous frames. I wonder what they're for? The old standard saw properly held and used can do all that you need to do.
Bob
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Bentiron
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« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2014, 06:29:22 pm »

Those frames have no flex so the theory is that you can't torque the frame and snap the blade, it works too, they are great for beginners but I just can justify the price. Another benefit is that you use the thumb screw on the top to adjust the tension of the blade rather than just pushing against your chest or the bench pin. my oldest saw, late 19th C. has a wing nut to do this, really helps to get a good consistent tension all the time which helps with blade life.
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« Reply #9 on: January 15, 2014, 05:12:05 pm »

I have a KnewConcepts saw and love it! Very few broken blades for a novice and the convenience of how to create the right tension is wonderful. I still use the old one too, with no problems. Time=less stress.
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« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2014, 05:45:22 am »

wow lots of good info: Really like the broken blade dispenser idea that one is ACE !!!!!!

but I guess i was to vague with my explanation "but that's not my first time lol"

My problem is Large hand wrapped around a small handle it tends to make tendonitis flare up well my solution is to wrap the handle with horse leg vet wrap its a self stick elastic gauze tape then a final wrap of good quality cloth medical tape as a finish smooth wrap.

so far its helping not to have to close my hand over such a small handle!!!!!!!   
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mirkaba
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« Reply #11 on: January 16, 2014, 06:25:25 am »

wow lots of good info: Really like the broken blade dispenser idea that one is ACE !!!!!!

but I guess i was to vague with my explanation "but that's not my first time lol"

My problem is Large hand wrapped around a small handle it tends to make tendonitis flare up well my solution is to wrap the handle with horse leg vet wrap its a self stick elastic gauze tape then a final wrap of good quality cloth medical tape as a finish smooth wrap.

so far its helping not to have to close my hand over such a small handle!!!!!!!   

I think its called "Gator Gauze" or something similar. It usually ends up on my wrist though..........
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« Reply #12 on: January 16, 2014, 03:30:07 pm »

I get you now! Well I have a pretty good sized hand too but I have never had that kind of problem so perhaps your bench pin is too low for you. However I suggest that you get a replacement hammer handle from the likes of ACE hardware, you know one that fills your hand and then cut it off and drill a hole for the saw tang, that should help with the too small of a grip. I used a broken hammer handle for my fret saw as it didn't have one when I got at a yard sale for a quarter, great buy, with this saw I can do a 16" deep cut. I don't use it all that often but when I do it sure is handy. Get the hammer handle, that way you don't need to find someone with a wood lathe.
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Goldsmithy
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« Reply #13 on: February 07, 2014, 10:56:19 am »

A lot of great information. The broken saw blade receptacle is a great idea. And so is the gator gauze. For years, I just wrapped , I just wrapped my saw holder with black electricians tape (the good stuff, the cheap stuff doesn't hold). 
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bobby1
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« Reply #14 on: February 07, 2014, 12:10:27 pm »

I find that just using a light grip on the handle prevents tendonitis for me. it also minimizes blade breakage.
Bob
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