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January 18, 2019, 04:53:37 am
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Foredom bench lathe

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Author Topic: Foredom bench lathe  (Read 1461 times)
lithicbeads
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« on: November 10, 2013, 05:42:45 pm »

 This is my foredom bench lathe . At 7.5 lbs or 3.4 kg it a stable machine that can easily be made more so as it has mounting holes. It is often used for jewelry finishing with various buffs on tapered spindles but I use it to polishing using wood wheels mounted permanently on threaded mandrels which I can interchange . I have a chuck also for it and collets and appropriate hardware are available. Any machinist could make a simple extension so that you could work a bit away from the machine  which would allow making a water shield so a drip could be used for carving . Everything is connected to the lathe by tightening the tool to the lathe shaft with two set screws. My hand size ( span ) is 26 cm . , 10.25 inches to give you an idea of how big the machine is. I usually run two 2 inch wheels simultaneously as the machine is very smooth. It seems to have very little run out when using small diamond carving tools which are the only ones I have used on it.










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mick B
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« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2013, 06:58:49 pm »

Thanks for posting this, does look like a good little unit, I like the variable speed option, I do have a point carver but no variable speed, with some splash guards I think it would be good, I did see a Chinese copy on Ebay for half the price, I don,t like there electrical systems when using water.

Cheers mick B
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3rdRockFromTheFun
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Arfzzz...


« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2013, 08:01:30 am »

Where did you get the wheels Frank - make them yourself or bought? That is _exactly_ what I'm trying to make from scratch right now (in it's entirety). Nice post!
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lithicbeads
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« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2013, 08:47:38 am »

 It was just me and a 2x4 then presto ! Wheels! I wanted redwood like Lopacki likes but that is not available here and I have not been able to find any of the wood types Henry Hunt calls for so I just used a 2 x4 that was destined for a shed project . I used a hole saw with a center bit in a portable hand drill and made a bunch of blanks. Then I drilled the center using the existing hole as a index point . After mounting them on the mandrel I put them in the carving machine and gently shaped them with a rasp.
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sealdaddy
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« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2013, 01:39:33 pm »

It was just me and a 2x4 then presto ! Wheels! I wanted redwood like Lopacki likes but that is not available here and I have not been able to find any of the wood types Henry Hunt calls for so I just used a 2 x4 that was destined for a shed project . I used a hole saw with a center bit in a portable hand drill and made a bunch of blanks. Then I drilled the center using the existing hole as a index point . After mounting them on the mandrel I put them in the carving machine and gently shaped them with a rasp.

I do the same thing, but use them on my rotary tool.
What speeds work best for you, Frank?
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sealdaddy
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« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2013, 01:54:33 pm »

and do you use your wood wheels dry...or with diamond paste, Frank?
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wyrock
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« Reply #6 on: November 11, 2013, 01:56:05 pm »

That is way cool. Is it possible to attach a flex shaft? That would kill two birds with one stone.

If they recommend red wood I am assuming that they do it because it is soft. I have some cedar here Frank that is pretty soft and might work pretty good. I can send some in your box if you want it.
Jim
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lithicbeads
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« Reply #7 on: November 11, 2013, 02:09:59 pm »

 I am using these wheels with diamond paste. Slow does not seem to do much with this type of wheel I have had more luck with medium fast . I think a flex shaft is available. Cedar would not be good. A lot of people question his use of redwood but not all redwoods are the same. If he had very tight grain old growth redwood that wood have tight grain and meet the main criteria Henry Hunt set for wood for wheels. I tried the closest grain cedar I have and it was a no go. The grain pulled the stone around at high speed.Boxwood is said to be the best alternative to pink ivorywood by Hunt. You need a hard wood that has tight grain and that is not too dark in color or oily. Doug fir is a softwood but it is much harder than a lot of hardwoods.  I have a bush growing here  , oceanspray , that is so hard that homesteaders made chisels ( gluts actually ) out of it. I have some I have dried for three years and it meets all the criteria , very hard , very tight grain that does not wander  , non-oily and light colored. I guess it is time to try some wheels from that wood next.
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sealdaddy
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« Reply #8 on: November 11, 2013, 02:36:09 pm »

Frank...you are making me want to experiment with Texas hardwoods, like Bois d'Arc and mesquite.
Both exceedingly hard.
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Goldsmithy
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« Reply #9 on: November 11, 2013, 04:44:23 pm »

I'll show my ignorance, what do your use wood wheels for?
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sealdaddy
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« Reply #10 on: November 11, 2013, 05:00:36 pm »

I'll show my ignorance, what do your use wood wheels for?

Polish...it's amazing how they can buff out a finish
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lithicbeads
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« Reply #11 on: November 11, 2013, 05:05:39 pm »

 I would get some branches that are fairly straight cut them about 8 inches long and cleanup one end and chuck it in a drill . Run the rest of it over a rasp to round it out then dry it for about 3 months but in a cool place so possibly it will not dry too fast and warp and check . chuck it in your drill press add diamond paste and try it. Most woods dry enough after 3 months for this type of thing but in your growing climate they may only need weeks.
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sealdaddy
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« Reply #12 on: November 11, 2013, 05:35:59 pm »

I would get some branches that are fairly straight cut them about 8 inches long and cleanup one end and chuck it in a drill . Run the rest of it over a rasp to round it out then dry it for about 3 months but in a cool place so possibly it will not dry too fast and warp and check . chuck it in your drill press add diamond paste and try it. Most woods dry enough after 3 months for this type of thing but in your growing climate they may only need weeks.

My mesquite is dry from 2 seasons ago...Bar-b-que wood
Have you ever heard of bois d'arc wood?
It is tough as nails~!!

The wood of the Osage-orange is golden yellow or bright orange when first cut, but turns brown on exposure. The wood is extremely hard, heavy, tough, and durable. It also shrinks or swells very little compared to the wood of other trees. The wood is used for fence posts, insulator pins, treenails, furniture, and archery bows. In fact, many archers consider the wood of the Osage-orange to be the world's finest wood for bows. (The name bodark is from the French bois d'arc mean "bow wood.")
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wyrock
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« Reply #13 on: November 11, 2013, 06:28:28 pm »

Old cotton wood is straight grained and is so hard you can not cut it with a chain saw. I guess if  you used a two by four it does not matter which way the grain is going.

The diamond paste is sticky enough that it does not fling off or do you run it slow?
Jim
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3rdRockFromTheFun
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Arfzzz...


« Reply #14 on: November 12, 2013, 01:11:04 am »

Ceder has a grain that tends to be of very different hardness's between the rings and the lines between rings. I know this from working with classical guitars (the grain can be very straight - acoustically aesthetic) so I imagine on stone it could be a real problem.

I have some beechwood I'm trying to work into wheels right now. I don't have a bench press that's aligned (just some old craftsman jigs for hand drills - I use them for the dremel and other odds and ends) so drilling holes straight is a huge problem for me. Any ideas on that would be great.

I think these can be used for mild grinding and pre-polish as well Goldsmithy. They're up-town in the results department for polishing though. Surprises me we don't see a lot more wood wheels (even blanks that require a lot of shaping) sold in lapidary supply. I see a few here and there but most, and the best, are the home-made ones.
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