General information about the Site

This lapidary and jewelry design community forum is dedicated to the novice, more experienced, and expert lapidaries and jewelry designers.

Forum cabochon in the Spotlight

Bob ( bobby1 ) shared this unknown druzy

Forum Jewelry Design in the Spotlight

John shared this beautiful pair of amethyst cufflinks

Forum Jewelry Design in the Spotlight

Mick B shared this stunning opal shell carving

Intarsias / Composites / Bead Making in the Spotlight

Kent shared this really nice Imperial Jasper pendant

Lapidary Related and Forum Member Shop Links

Brian Ababurko Silversmithing Classes / Rock Rollers Club

Dons Lapidary Arts

Idaho Rock Shop

Rare Rocks and Gems

Coyote Rainbow

Lightninghorse

Rocky Treasures

Talking Rocks

Fine Gem Designs

Idaho Rockman

Fine Woodwork and Lapidary

Darkstar Jewelry

DLC Gems

Teton Art Gallery

Art Cut Gems

Woman With A Torch

Lapidary Buy and Sell (Facebook Group)

Lapidary (Facebook Group)

Lapidary Equipment Marketplace (Facebook Group)


Lapidary / Gemstone Community Forum
February 22, 2019, 01:09:28 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
  Home Help Search Login Register  

Weighted slab saw weights?

Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Weighted slab saw weights?  (Read 897 times)
sealdaddy
Guest
« Reply #15 on: February 02, 2014, 05:53:06 pm »

Ok, just for the heck of it, have you set the clutch as "soft" as it will go?
Report Spam   Logged
kenefick
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 220


« Reply #16 on: February 03, 2014, 08:09:12 am »

Actually, I have.  When first setting up, I loosened the clutch to the point it wouldn't even move the vice sled, so I guess the feed rate at that point was zero.  Seems to me that the feed rate then is either zero or full, with a slipping clutch being the difference.  A frequently slipping clutch would wear, so the tension would vary over time.   Adjustment is a matter of tightening a nut while holding the feed screw so that you can stop the rotation by hand.  Not a very precise method i.e. how hard do you pinch the feed screw?  I'm thinking a speed control on the feed motor would be a lot better option.
Report Spam   Logged

Ken

Growing old is mandatory.  Growing up is optional.

kennyg
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 499



« Reply #17 on: February 03, 2014, 11:02:34 am »

I pretty much swear by the clutch system, but the one used on my Beacon star is quite different from the covington type, that is in the looks the principle is the same. When I adjust mine I stick the hardest rock I have in the vise and run it through if it binds and stops the blade I back it off and loosen the pressure to the point that the blade spins free in the cut. The hardness of the rock is not the only factor though, the more surface area the blade has to go through so you may have to back it off even more to account for the thickness of the cut. I don't use the 6"/hr or that type of gauge if the rock is hard and thick then it may take 2 hrs. for the sake of your blade just be patient.
Report Spam   Logged
guest3478
Guest
« Reply #18 on: February 03, 2014, 07:26:26 pm »

big rocks, TWO milk jugs of water.
small rock, ONE milk jug of water

this is working for me.
Report Spam   Logged
sealdaddy
Guest
« Reply #19 on: February 04, 2014, 03:35:52 am »

big rocks, TWO milk jugs of water.
small rock, ONE milk jug of water

this is working for me.

But he does NOT have a weighted system!!
Report Spam   Logged
guest3478
Guest
« Reply #20 on: February 04, 2014, 01:20:50 pm »

big rocks, TWO milk jugs of water.
small rock, ONE milk jug of water

this is working for me.

But he does NOT have a weighted system!!
this is my topic so I thought I would reply that I figured it out.  LoL
Report Spam   Logged
sealdaddy
Guest
« Reply #21 on: February 04, 2014, 01:57:41 pm »

big rocks, TWO milk jugs of water.
small rock, ONE milk jug of water

this is working for me.

But he does NOT have a weighted system!!
this is my topic so I thought I would reply that I figured out out.  LoL

Oops....you are right...Sorry  saved2
Report Spam   Logged
Isotelus
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1027



« Reply #22 on: February 10, 2014, 07:50:08 am »

About a year ago I bought a Highland Park 10" trim saw minus the weight feed assembly. I just fabricated one from a short section of 3" PVC pipe an end cap and made a sort of bucket bail from #10 wire and a short section of air craft cable over the saws weight feed pulley. The weight is varied by adding sand or gravel as needed or dumping it whatever is required.

I have no idea what the original weight system looked like but this one works well for me.
Report Spam   Logged

Bryan
catmandewe
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1159



WWW
« Reply #23 on: February 10, 2014, 11:47:47 pm »

I use 9 lbs on my 24" great western, it is a tad heavy but it seems to work on everything. It does cause glazing on larger harder rocks, but i just keep reversing my blade. It will wear the blade out faster that way,  but I am willing to do that to cut faster.
I am thinking 16 lbs on an 18" is a tad much, you will probably go through blades pretty fast.

Tony
Report Spam   Logged





Get free shipping and/or discounts on products at Cabking by using the following link.
http://cabking.com/ref/IdahoRockShop/


Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum | Buy traffic for your forum/website

Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy