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February 22, 2019, 01:09:39 pm
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Weighted slab saw weights?

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Author Topic: Weighted slab saw weights?  (Read 897 times)
guest3478
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« on: September 30, 2013, 05:36:43 pm »

whats an optimal weight that you weighted pull slab saw owners use most?

I am going to try and make some weights of a couple three different variables to use on my 16" saw.

Just want the most used weight first lol!

I was thinking 15lbs would be a start?
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catmandewe
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« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2013, 06:09:13 pm »

For my 18" I filled a pop can about 2/3 full of lead (bend a wire and set it inside the can before you pour for the hanger), then after it cooled I just peeled the can off. Not sure how much it weighs but it works pretty good. I poured several different sized weights when I made them and the 2/3 one works best on that saw. Every saw likes a different weight so experiment with a few and then make one that is the right weight for your saw. It is better to be underweight than over weight, if you run it over weight it will glaze your blade.

Tony
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RockIt2Me
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« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2013, 07:37:05 pm »

I used a plastic milk jug filled with water. 
Figuring a gallon of water weighs 8#, you can adjust the appropriate weight easily.
15# sounds pretty heavy.  I started with around 4# and worked from there.
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guest3478
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« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2013, 09:09:06 pm »

well, the milk jug filled with water did well on obsidian, but its not quite heavy enough for the jasper or agate.
So guessing on the pressure i put on the stone with my hand pushing, i am thinking 15lbs for harder rocks.
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sealdaddy
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« Reply #4 on: October 01, 2013, 02:51:27 pm »

well, the milk jug filled with water did well on obsidian, but its not quite heavy enough for the jasper or agate.
So guessing on the pressure i put on the stone with my hand pushing, i am thinking 15lbs for harder rocks.
I use a 1 1/2 gallon plastic jug of something I bought at a bulk store...I forget what.
It gives me a lot of latitude from 5 lbs to 12 lbs...although I usually stay at 8 lbs or less.
You may want a 2 gallon jug for That Much weight.
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kenefick
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« Reply #5 on: October 01, 2013, 04:40:38 pm »

Keep in mind that I haven't run a weight-feed saw in a long time.
Harder/denser rock like agate or jasper means there is more material to remove.  Remember, you're not really cutting, but grinding.  If you have too much weight, the blade may be forced against the material faster than it can remove it.  The blade may chatter a bit, leaving saw marks that you will have to grind away later.  The blade may overheat from too much friction, which is not good.
Like the kung-fu guy said "Patience grasshopper".
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Ken

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guest3478
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« Reply #6 on: October 01, 2013, 04:56:55 pm »

I'm thinking I want to cut a fire brick and dress my blade before I go tinkering with weights. Right?
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« Reply #7 on: October 01, 2013, 05:17:34 pm »

Might be a good idea, specially if is an older blade.  They can get glazed (my eyesight and sense of touch isn"t good enough to tell), and the firebrick can freshen the surface (exposing more diamond).
Just for reference, I have auto-feed on my saw.  On softer material, it often sounds like the blade is just idling through, but when cutting a really hard material, I sometimes have to disable the auto feed periodically to let it 'catch up'.  I know the engineers that designed these things probably went with the "best overall rate", but I doubt that they cut everything that's out there.
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Ken

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sealdaddy
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« Reply #8 on: October 01, 2013, 05:36:39 pm »

Keep in mind that I haven't run a weight-feed saw in a long time.
Harder/denser rock like agate or jasper means there is more material to remove.  Remember, you're not really cutting, but grinding.  If you have too much weight, the blade may be forced against the material faster than it can remove it.  The blade may chatter a bit, leaving saw marks that you will have to grind away later.  The blade may overheat from too much friction, which is not good.
Like the kung-fu guy said "Patience grasshopper".

Right, Ken
You have taught me about not using too much weight. Now I don't and just let it take a bit longer.
The blade and slab are only warm not, instead of Hot...and I know the blade will last longer.
The cutting sounds like "scuffing" or intermittent sanding/chipping now.
Thanks friend~!!
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« Reply #9 on: October 01, 2013, 06:56:27 pm »

Ken not sure about your saw but there should be a way to adjust that. There is on mine
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kenefick
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« Reply #10 on: October 02, 2013, 07:05:38 am »

Mine is a Covington 10" slab/trim saw.  The only adjustment I've found is the clutch, and that is pretty lame.  I've considered adding a speed control to the drive motor, but so far, not enough need compared to the expense.
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Ken

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« Reply #11 on: October 02, 2013, 08:28:10 am »

Ya that's what I was referring to, that's too bad I have an old beacon star and it is very good. at least for up to very hard agate.
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« Reply #12 on: February 02, 2014, 01:49:48 pm »

I know this is an older post and you have probably found a solution, but what about using cannon ball fishing weight to a down rigger clip . Weights come in many different sizes so easy to adjust . Just thinking out loud here not sure it is the right thing though.

Ernie
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Ernie
sealdaddy
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« Reply #13 on: February 02, 2014, 02:12:36 pm »

Mine is a Covington 10" slab/trim saw.  The only adjustment I've found is the clutch, and that is pretty lame.  I've considered adding a speed control to the drive motor, but so far, not enough need compared to the expense.

Ken, wouldn't a clutch adjustment be the same as a weight adjustment?
Like setting the drag on a fishing reel.
With the drag(cluch) set "hard", you could pull in a heavier fish than you could with the drag(clutch) set looser.
Or am I wrong?
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« Reply #14 on: February 02, 2014, 03:18:26 pm »

As I understand it, the clutch is more of a 'safety' feature.  If the blade is being forced against the stone with more pressure that it can relieve by cutting, the clutch will slip and, supposedly, keep it from binding.  The feed rate remains the same, it just won't feed until it has someplace to go.  Kind of like putting the front bumper of you truck against a big tree.  The wheels may spin and the clutch might slip, but the truck and the tree aren't going anywhere.
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Ken

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sealdaddy
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« Reply #15 on: February 02, 2014, 05:53:06 pm »

Ok, just for the heck of it, have you set the clutch as "soft" as it will go?
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« Reply #16 on: February 03, 2014, 08:09:12 am »

Actually, I have.  When first setting up, I loosened the clutch to the point it wouldn't even move the vice sled, so I guess the feed rate at that point was zero.  Seems to me that the feed rate then is either zero or full, with a slipping clutch being the difference.  A frequently slipping clutch would wear, so the tension would vary over time.   Adjustment is a matter of tightening a nut while holding the feed screw so that you can stop the rotation by hand.  Not a very precise method i.e. how hard do you pinch the feed screw?  I'm thinking a speed control on the feed motor would be a lot better option.
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Ken

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« Reply #17 on: February 03, 2014, 11:02:34 am »

I pretty much swear by the clutch system, but the one used on my Beacon star is quite different from the covington type, that is in the looks the principle is the same. When I adjust mine I stick the hardest rock I have in the vise and run it through if it binds and stops the blade I back it off and loosen the pressure to the point that the blade spins free in the cut. The hardness of the rock is not the only factor though, the more surface area the blade has to go through so you may have to back it off even more to account for the thickness of the cut. I don't use the 6"/hr or that type of gauge if the rock is hard and thick then it may take 2 hrs. for the sake of your blade just be patient.
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guest3478
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« Reply #18 on: February 03, 2014, 07:26:26 pm »

big rocks, TWO milk jugs of water.
small rock, ONE milk jug of water

this is working for me.
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sealdaddy
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« Reply #19 on: February 04, 2014, 03:35:52 am »

big rocks, TWO milk jugs of water.
small rock, ONE milk jug of water

this is working for me.

But he does NOT have a weighted system!!
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guest3478
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« Reply #20 on: February 04, 2014, 01:20:50 pm »

big rocks, TWO milk jugs of water.
small rock, ONE milk jug of water

this is working for me.

But he does NOT have a weighted system!!
this is my topic so I thought I would reply that I figured it out.  LoL
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sealdaddy
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« Reply #21 on: February 04, 2014, 01:57:41 pm »

big rocks, TWO milk jugs of water.
small rock, ONE milk jug of water

this is working for me.

But he does NOT have a weighted system!!
this is my topic so I thought I would reply that I figured out out.  LoL

Oops....you are right...Sorry  saved2
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« Reply #22 on: February 10, 2014, 07:50:08 am »

About a year ago I bought a Highland Park 10" trim saw minus the weight feed assembly. I just fabricated one from a short section of 3" PVC pipe an end cap and made a sort of bucket bail from #10 wire and a short section of air craft cable over the saws weight feed pulley. The weight is varied by adding sand or gravel as needed or dumping it whatever is required.

I have no idea what the original weight system looked like but this one works well for me.
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Bryan
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« Reply #23 on: February 10, 2014, 11:47:47 pm »

I use 9 lbs on my 24" great western, it is a tad heavy but it seems to work on everything. It does cause glazing on larger harder rocks, but i just keep reversing my blade. It will wear the blade out faster that way,  but I am willing to do that to cut faster.
I am thinking 16 lbs on an 18" is a tad much, you will probably go through blades pretty fast.

Tony
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http://cabking.com/ref/IdahoRockShop/


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