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Lapidary / Gemstone Community Forum
April 20, 2019, 02:17:56 pm
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Saw oil

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Author Topic: Saw oil  (Read 2259 times)
Ima Nuguy
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« Reply #45 on: April 23, 2014, 10:53:16 pm »

Greetings,

Being the proud new owner of a like new 24" Highland Park Mod U, I asked around about oils, both pros and hobbyists. I read MSDS, I read manufacturers recommendations, I read oil and gas industry product descriptions, and I talked to fuel/oil  distributor sales reps and both I talked to knew products used in lapidary.

Cheap but stinks to high heaven, one long time hobbyist I know uses kerosene!

The commercial Roc Oil is mineral oil based and I found no complaints other than price.

The manufacturer specifically lists a thin mineral oil.

Shipping, if needed, is really-really expensive!

The veterinarians around here only have small quantities of horse laxative mineral oil.

So, for me... I ordered the Chevron product "Shingle Oil" in 5 gal buckets for $82 which included a local truck delivery to my neighborhood Cenex gas station (I'd guess that it could be delivered to any fuel station or mechanic's shop selling/using Chevron products. This specific product was recommended by 2 longtime pro's as well).

It is still cool here, but so far I am not noticing any mist or odor, it drains into the saw basin rapidly, rock dust settles out of the oil rapidly, it coats the blade well, cleans easily (Dawn) and the couple dozen cuts made in Obsidian and petrified wood are very smooth. (As I understand, these rocks are pretty easy on saws).

If it were just my limited experience, I'd keep it to myself. But in this case I'm just verifying what half a dozen long time users have suggested.

Also, this VW sized saw would have taken 15 gallons, I filled the bottom side farthest from the blade with bricks to cut the volume to 10 gallons (also suggested by the friend I got the saw from).
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slabbercabber
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« Reply #46 on: April 24, 2014, 06:33:20 am »

I use only mineral oil from whatever oil supplier is convenient.  Denver has several.  I often open the saw while the blade is still spinning ( I run a dry sump with cascade settler and pump.)  and never have any mist.  In fact the saws are in my finished basement.  If you are getting a misting problem, I would suggest you go through the saw and look for blade misalignment or other cause of excessive friction.  Any oil that is formulated for a particular purpose is done so with additives.  Please be sure you know what is in the oil you are using.  Some hydraulic oils are very hard on the skin.  I can't imagine what they would do to lungs.  All hydraulic oils are hygroscopic.  We had a young engineer at work some years back who OK'd hydraulic oil for lubricating the production machinery.  I found out about it when I noticed rust bubbling up out of the journal bushings and started asking questions.  It would likely be fine in very dry conditions, but we run swamp coolers during the summer.
  After sawing, I let the slabs drain on edge for a day then bury them in fine kitty litter for another day.  After that a quick rinse is usually all the is needed.  By the way, I recover a pretty fair amount of oil from the draining.
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zirconx
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« Reply #47 on: April 24, 2014, 07:19:24 am »

I also only use mineral oil.  We have tried many things including antifreeze (disaster).  Latest purchase was mineral oil for horse laxative.   Is really too thick and takes a long time to settle out the dirt.  Am going to try a new mineral oil next.  It was being sold at Quartzsite and is supposed to be thinner.  Mia Mining  is the Company,  Kevin Kessler  is the man we spoke to.   He is located out of Joshua Tree, Ca.  Will let you know how we like it.  Bev
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« Reply #48 on: April 24, 2014, 08:20:22 am »

I use this mineral oil.  They have 2 kinds & I use the light one.  I pay $14 each, get 4 at a time & shipping is free.

http://www.scbt.com/datasheet-359654.html
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« Reply #49 on: May 21, 2014, 07:22:32 pm »

I use this mineral oil.  They have 2 kinds & I use the light one.  I pay $14 each, get 4 at a time & shipping is free.

http://www.scbt.com/datasheet-359654.html

Yup Yup... I use this too!!

And I can vouch that the price is still good too, I was on their site 5/19/2014 and they were still at $14/Gal. with free shipping for orders over $50.00 (4 Gals)

Best price I have seen, especially for people with large sump saws!!
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« Reply #50 on: May 22, 2014, 01:38:23 am »

I ordered 4 gals.  $56 no shipping chrg.  I haven't used it yet as we are still in the process of moving to this great state of Oregon.
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« Reply #51 on: May 22, 2014, 07:01:48 am »

FWIW.  When I picked up my HP J2 - 18"  and started looking for oil, I got lucky and found a distributor in the area who had food grade mineral oil for $10/gal.  I say lucky, because it was the last two 5 gallon buckets he had at that price.  His supplier had changed manufacturers and the new price was $14 / gal. 
The oil is Duoprime 90, and I am very pleased with it.  Unlike the Tractor Supply horse lax I was using in my 10" (at $18 / gal), the Duoprime drains off cut slabs quickly, leaving them nearly dry overnight.  I think the horse lax may have some "coating ingredient" that makes it more difficult to clean off.
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« Reply #52 on: July 02, 2014, 10:09:12 am »

If you check the Yellow pages for industrial oil distributor you will likely find food grade mineral oil. Some brands call theirs Technical white oil. It has no smell and is very easy on your skin.  I used Shell Pella oil when I was a newbie and got my first 18 inch Highland Park saw and it caused me to cough and my arms got a rash.  Last time I purchased a five gallon bucket is was about $75.00.Wholesale food distributors may also carry it
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« Reply #53 on: July 05, 2014, 03:52:55 am »

A question on oils to use.

I have been using light mineral cutting oil as recommended by the saw manufacturer for the last 5 years. it does work well.

However its not cheap!

I note that some use hydraulic oil.

Has anyone tried used/old industrial or automotive hydraulic oil?

Some places will almost pay you to take it away!
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« Reply #54 on: July 05, 2014, 08:13:38 am »

We've been using the DuoPrime 90 here. No complaints with performance. About $90 for 5 gallon buckets here. Will look into the "Light" oil from Agri-Labs later (club meeting this AM) but expect it's similar - just not "food grade" rated. If it's thinner I might try it.
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« Reply #55 on: July 06, 2014, 03:00:48 pm »

FWIW.  When I picked up my HP J2 - 18"  and started looking for oil, I got lucky and found a distributor in the area who had food grade mineral oil for $10/gal.  I say lucky, because it was the last two 5 gallon buckets he had at that price.  His supplier had changed manufacturers and the new price was $14 / gal. 
The oil is Duoprime 90, and I am very pleased with it.  Unlike the Tractor Supply horse lax I was using in my 10" (at $18 / gal), the Duoprime drains off cut slabs quickly, leaving them nearly dry overnight.  I think the horse lax may have some "coating ingredient" that makes it more difficult to clean off.

That's very interesting.  If I ever get setup, I am going to try the horse lax I bought.
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« Reply #56 on: April 28, 2015, 10:35:47 am »

While I was in Quartzite this year, I picked up 10 gallons of Stellar Lubricants Platinum Cut coolant oil. It's scented with Orange Oil, so there is no unpleasant odor to it at all and it has worked fine so far. I believe I paid about $75 per 5 gallon bucket.

Stellarlubricants.com
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« Reply #57 on: April 28, 2015, 12:14:01 pm »

Just picked up 55 gallons of white oil for $6.00 dollars a gallon.

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« Reply #58 on: April 28, 2015, 01:05:53 pm »

Food grade mineral oil is available from many sources and brands. It is virtually odor free and is not a hazard to your breathing or skin.  Shell calls theirs, TECHNICAL WHITE OIL and I last ordered mine in 5 gallon buckets from a local industrial oil distributor and they delivered to my door on their local truck for about $75.00 a gallon. The meat cutter suggestion that was made is a good suggestion. I have an 18"Highland Park and it takes five gallons.
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« Reply #59 on: April 28, 2015, 03:48:33 pm »

I think you guys are missing out by not using water soluble cutting and grinding oil it will cut your costs down, only time I have noticed misting is when the saw starts running hot indicating you need to add oil or dress the blade or the blade is worn out, they are generally biodegradable. Lapidary suppliers sell it as the form kool lube and such but it can be bought in automotive supply stores, or Ace hardware. A 10:1 ratio is very good so costs run about 3$ to 4$ per gallon. BTW it is a mineral oil base. You can check the MSDS sheets out on it they are all pretty close to being the same. I have been using this for years and it works very well for me.   
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