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Lapidary / Gemstone Community Forum
April 24, 2019, 12:14:56 pm
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Saw oil

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Author Topic: Saw oil  (Read 2259 times)
deb193
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« Reply #30 on: September 22, 2013, 08:35:15 pm »

I wait until there is about 25lbs of slabs in the bucket, anywhere from 10 days to months depending on my mood. I have learned that the slab bucket will freeze during particularly cold Jan in Kansas.
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« Reply #31 on: September 22, 2013, 08:43:27 pm »

I just wash them like dishes then rinse.
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-Gary

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denny
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« Reply #32 on: September 23, 2013, 07:14:09 am »

I put mine in liquid degreaser for two days, pull them out and wash them with Dawn.  that's it!
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sealdaddy
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« Reply #33 on: September 23, 2013, 07:16:22 am »

I put mine in liquid degreaser for two days, pull them out and wash them with Dawn.  that's it!
Which liquid degreaser, please?
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denny
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« Reply #34 on: September 23, 2013, 01:57:08 pm »

Whichever one is available at either Home Depot or WalMart when I go there.  My last time I got a five gallon container from HD.  That was three months ago and I still have enough left for another month or so.
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hardrockcafe
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« Reply #35 on: September 25, 2013, 02:43:03 pm »

I just got a quote for $64.71 for 5 gallons of Mineral Seal Oil from LubeTech.   woohoo2  Last time it cost me over $75.

I feel sorry for those of you who have to get oil shipped.  I got a quote from a company in Texas for a similar product that was $173 shipped.  That seems to be about the going rate - $150 to $175, sometimes plus shipping.

I like the Mineral Seal Oil because it has no additives, although it is prone to misting.  I just add NoSmoke.

Chuck
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« Reply #36 on: September 25, 2013, 04:04:12 pm »

I use mineral oil from tractor supply myself... once the slab is done cutting, I just turn off saw and let it sit for a minute while I finish what ever else I am working on, then when I open the hood there is little to no misting there, but I am also in my shed so mist is a non issue for me, especially in Fla. where during the winter it gets down to a seriously chilly 60 degree during the day and as low as 40 at night!!! hide 

for cleaning the slabs I use one of those citrus based cleaners from Sams club, about $9/gallon and add about 1 cup to 3 gallons of water. Then I just throw in slabs as I cut then and at weeks end pull them out and a quick scrub with a brush and rinse in bucket again or hit it with the garden hos, 10 minutes in the sun and they are good 2 go!! coolshuffle
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« Reply #37 on: September 25, 2013, 09:14:27 pm »

You should be able to find mineral oil for around $40 per five gallons. Good place to ask is your favorite restaurant or large farm, they should be able to point you to a wholesale company/supply company.
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hardrockcafe
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« Reply #38 on: September 26, 2013, 08:33:23 pm »

Yeah, I looked up the web sites for the restaurant supply companies and butcher suppliers; none listed mineral oil.  Guess I'll have to call.

Chuck
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« Reply #39 on: September 27, 2013, 09:15:39 am »

Big R has mineral oil.
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« Reply #40 on: September 27, 2013, 11:04:58 am »

I use a water soluble grinding and cutting oil from an auto parts store. My reasoning for this is two fold one is that it costs me about 25-30$ for a gallon of concentrate so it costs me between 2-3$/gal you can vary the concentration to make it more or less viscous. If you have worked around diamond core drilling rigs I mean the type that are used for mineral exploration they only use water for their bits, the reasons are that water is a better cooling agent than oil, and you need to be sure to flush all the cuttings because regrinding is very hard on the blade or bit. You do want some oil though just to reduce the friction that generates the heat but the least you can get by with the better I have run as low as 20-1 for softer minerals then pumped it up for quarts/agate/jasper and you can just add it straight from the bottle when needed then thin it down with water when needed. I also use lots and lots of liquid when sawing makes it messy but sure keeps the kerf cleaned out.
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hulagrub
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« Reply #41 on: September 27, 2013, 06:55:41 pm »

Water and bearings?
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« Reply #42 on: September 27, 2013, 07:27:29 pm »

Most bearings are sealed and used on equipment that is in the elements during rain, sleet, snow all kinds of extremes and many don't even have grease zerks so I really don't see that as a big problem the bearings aren't sitting under the oil water surface.
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« Reply #43 on: September 27, 2013, 08:34:19 pm »

I have bought, cleaned up, refurbed  and used or sold over 50 slab saws and the ones that had water used in them are almost always  in far worse shape than the ones that had oil in them. I have only ever gotten one that had water used in it that wasn't in bad shape and it was because it was made out of stainless steel.

Core drilling rigs use water because they don't want to clean up the oil, plus it is cheaper, which is a plus when you are using thousands of gallons for coolant.

Tony
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kennyg
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« Reply #44 on: September 27, 2013, 09:17:55 pm »

maybe I wasn't explaining what I was using so here with the pros and cons


These cutting oils are more commonly referred to as soluble oils. This however, is a misnomer because they are not really soluble in water but form an emulsion when added to water. These emulsifiable oils are mineral oil based concentrates, which contain emulsifiers that allow them to mix with water and form a milky white emulsion. They also contain additives to improve their lubricating properties, rust and corrosion inhibitors and a biocide to help control foul smell.
 

Water Soluble Cutting OIlThere are several advantages of water emulsifiable oils, viz.: good cooling, low viscosity and thus adequate wetting abilities, non-flammable and nontoxic, easy to clean from small chips and wear particles using standard filters, relatively low initial and disposal cost. There are few disadvantages also viz.: low lubricity, foul smell, misting etc. However these oils are the most popular cutting fluids in use today, because they combine the lubricating qualities of oil with the cooling properties of water and can be used in a wide range of both machining and grinding operations
 
You are right about the big rigs Tony the cost would be prohibitive probably but the other reason is that environmental laws won't allow it , although oil rigs use diesel fuel.
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