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Lapidary / Gemstone Community Forum
March 20, 2019, 07:53:56 am
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Freeform Gem Carving - Demonstration of technique

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Author Topic: Freeform Gem Carving - Demonstration of technique  (Read 3735 times)
Taogem
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« on: January 19, 2009, 10:45:40 pm »

Freeform Gem Carving

Demonstration of technique By: Hans Meevis



 
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Bluesssman
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« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2009, 09:01:22 am »

That is a really good article. Having as many pictures as he did really helps me understand much better. Silly things like what the wooden polishing wheel looks like after adding the diamond paste. Thanks...
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Lavenderfish
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« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2009, 01:38:08 pm »

Hans Meevis' work is so creative and all of his jewelry tutorials are great. I too, followed parts of this aquamarine tutorial when had a piece of silky aqua I wanted to carve.

Here's another very good tutorial by Katerina Kestemont with some chrysoprase that really shows you a gradual metamorphosis of the stone as it goes from very rough to finished.

http://www.free-form.ch/education/book06/index.html

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Bluesssman
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« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2009, 02:00:13 pm »

Carol, I believe you are about to head to Quartzite. When you get back would you mind sharing your carving work station and maybe talk about the equipment and supplies you use?

Thanks so much,

Gary
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Lavenderfish
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« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2009, 02:37:13 pm »

Hey Gary,

Boy I sure WISH I were heading to Quartzite! One day I'll get there.....

I don't have a dedicated carving station per se but you betcha, I'll take some pix tonight of what I use to carve on & with  :)

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Taogem
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« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2009, 03:04:23 pm »

That is a great step by step tutorial by Katerina Kestemont. Really breaks it down in great detail.

Thanks for that Carol.
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Lavenderfish
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« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2009, 08:21:51 pm »

Ok Gary, Here are some pix of my carving lathe and assorted burs, etc. Part I......

Foredom carving lathe with variable speed + flex attachment with 43T handpiece
Diamond burs, 150, 240, 600 grits, most lapidary suppliers have these
More small diamond burs in a variety of shapes, purchased from Daniel Lopacki
Even more diamond burs, purchased from Harbor Freight, approx. 100 grit






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Bluesssman
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« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2009, 08:41:24 pm »

Thank you, Carol, for taking the time to show me some of your equipment. It helps me better understand...
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Lavenderfish
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« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2009, 08:53:40 pm »

Part II....

Tackle box with various finishing supplies; mini diamond discs, wooden dowels, bristle brushes and shown mainly to point out importance of keeping everything separated to avoid cross contamination between grits.

Rubber mandrels (black at upper left) to mount small diamond discs onto, bristle brush loaded with 3000 grit diamond paste (blue at top), some wooden points and tiny wheels made from various diameters of dowels.  For size perspective, the 3000 brush is about 3/4" diameter.

Range of diamond grit pastes from 360 up to 50,000 & can see which ones I used a lot more of.

A pic of my very cluttered work space at one end of the bench. It ain't pretty but took a lot of work to mess it up juuuust right for that "lived in" look.



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CosmicFolklore
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« Reply #9 on: April 26, 2009, 09:18:14 pm »

My little baggies keep getting coated in the extender, making the sharpie writing on my baggies run and fuz up.  And, my boxes keep getting coated in rock dust.  How on earth do you keep your carving tools so clean?  Am I just a slob? 
LOL, uhhh, the answer to that is yes, but I would love tips on keeping my carving tools as neat as yours :)
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gsellis
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« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2010, 05:58:50 am »

Resurrecting an old thread (including having read the red text about 120 old day threads).

Hans also has those tutorials on his site at http://www.meevis.com/  There is a Jewelry Class section on the left pane that has his topics.  And at his site, you can see more recent examples.
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CosmicFolklore
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« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2010, 12:01:53 pm »

I also love his blogs at http://ganoksin.com/blogs/
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Rockoteer
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« Reply #12 on: August 24, 2010, 01:46:54 pm »


I don't think there is an end to what you can do with stone, I really don't.  This is just another exciting branch of the lapidary world.
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-Gary

Of all the things I've lost..I miss my mind the most.

Whether you think you can, or you think you can't, you're probably right.
3rdRockFromTheFun
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Arfzzz...


« Reply #13 on: January 01, 2012, 03:18:33 pm »

Those tutorials are awesome! Especially regarding the use of wooden dowels ground to wheels and charged with diamond. I'm heading for the olive oil! I was polishing a rock a week or so ago and decided to test all of the courser grits I have (rather than my usual hand sanding). Talk about a mess! I had diamond in red and blue all over the place except on the felt and cloth wheels I was using (on a hand rotary tool - dremel or craftsman, I forget - I have both). Even at low speeds the stuff would either spray off the wheels or gum up: I was testing several premixed diamond compounds (which is where the red and blue came from - I wish they would not color that stuff - as well as powders mixed with a variety of things. I even resorted to trying vaseline with 220 grit on felt - I don't recommend that unless you don't like the person you're advising  hide ...

Anyway, I ended up hand sanding the whole thing back to 220 about three times (to correct my experimenting) and finally completed a fourth round of sanding from 220 through 1500 (silicon carbide / gatorgrit wet-dry) before polishing. In other words I gained nothing except a little knowledge on what not to do.

Thanks again for the tuts - these are so helpful to beginners like myself, I cannot even  express...
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-frank-

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Helene
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« Reply #14 on: April 08, 2012, 08:45:37 pm »

Would using a 240 to 300 mesh diamond paste work in lieu of the silicon carbide 240 grit paper.
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Tom Davis
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« Reply #15 on: December 18, 2012, 08:54:59 pm »

Very nice tutorial, pictures, and comments.  Will utilize some of these procedures in future projects.
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3rdRockFromTheFun
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Arfzzz...


« Reply #16 on: December 19, 2012, 05:22:18 am »

This tut was where I first heard of split mandrels. Made my own at first - could never get the split centered - these are worth the money to buy (they're cheap) as they're centered and balanced properly; they spin true.

I'm looking at this guys grit sequence and thinking he's nuts - but look at the piece (and hit his web site - he consistently makes little masterpieces of polished splendor) - there is no arguing with his results.
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-frank-

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Michellek1123
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« Reply #17 on: February 06, 2014, 12:07:05 am »

This may seem strange, and this is an old post. But I use a website called Denvergemcutting for tutorials. The guy has really good rough, so that helps, but his work is awesome too. Lol they're not meant to be tutorials.
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-Michelle


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