General information about the Site

This lapidary and jewelry design community forum is dedicated to the novice, more experienced, and expert lapidaries and jewelry designers.

Forum cabochon in the Spotlight

Bob ( bobby1 ) shared this unknown druzy

Forum Jewelry Design in the Spotlight

John shared this beautiful pair of amethyst cufflinks

Forum Jewelry Design in the Spotlight

Mick B shared this stunning opal shell carving

Intarsias / Composites / Bead Making in the Spotlight

Kent shared this really nice Imperial Jasper pendant

Lapidary Related and Forum Member Shop Links

Brian Ababurko Silversmithing Classes / Rock Rollers Club

Dons Lapidary Arts

Idaho Rock Shop

Rare Rocks and Gems

Coyote Rainbow

Lightninghorse

Rocky Treasures

Talking Rocks

Fine Gem Designs

Idaho Rockman

Fine Woodwork and Lapidary

Darkstar Jewelry

DLC Gems

Teton Art Gallery

Art Cut Gems

Woman With A Torch

Lapidary Buy and Sell (Facebook Group)

Lapidary (Facebook Group)

Lapidary Equipment Marketplace (Facebook Group)


Lapidary / Gemstone Community Forum
February 22, 2019, 01:36:38 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
  Home Help Search Login Register  

Cutting oil

Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Cutting oil  (Read 1197 times)
Bluesssman
Guest
« on: December 24, 2008, 08:06:24 pm »

I purchased a used 24" slab saw and after much cleaning and rewiring of the unit, I am ready to try it. I have cutting oil to add, but do not know how much to use. I am guessing I need to add enough to cover the bottom of the blade, but how much of the bottom would you suggest?
Report Spam   Logged

travelerga
Guest
« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2008, 02:37:10 am »

1/4 to 1/2 inch should be enough.
Report Spam   Logged
Bluesssman
Guest
« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2008, 09:10:59 am »

Thank you, Travelerga! Have a wonderful holiday!
Report Spam   Logged
Taogem
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 12343



« Reply #3 on: December 25, 2008, 11:55:38 am »

I now that Travelerga is correct, but I do cover mine to one inch.

Have you decided on an oil ?

I have had good luck with mineral oil.
Report Spam   Logged

travelerga
Guest
« Reply #4 on: December 25, 2008, 01:24:01 pm »

At present I am using a mineral oil for animals,it is 14.00 a gallon. you can also go to an air conditioning supply hoiuse and gety the mineral oil they se for R-22 freon but it is about 25.00 a gallon.

George if I run my saw with an inch of blde covered it foams like liquid soap in a dishwasher,,,,, whoooo whoooo lol
Report Spam   Logged
Bluesssman
Guest
« Reply #5 on: December 25, 2008, 03:28:21 pm »

I will be using a mineral oil from Shell. A 55 gallon drum came with the saw with about 48 gallons left. Most excited to give it a try!
Report Spam   Logged
Taogem
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 12343



« Reply #6 on: December 25, 2008, 06:20:51 pm »

At present I am using a mineral oil for animals,it is 14.00 a gallon.

Me too....   :)
Report Spam   Logged

theimage1
Guest
« Reply #7 on: December 26, 2008, 10:55:50 am »

I will have to try some of the Mineral Oil for animals ... where do you find it?

I tried the Covington Oil and it makes me break-out in a rash. I have since settled on the oil called Roc-Oil but it runs about $23 a gallon + shipping. It works without the rash, so I pay the price. In order to use less oil I put a silicon bead around the bottom on the saw pan and use it to kepp a set of bricks stationary. It's not to hold oil, it keeps the bricks from moving due to vibration. The bricks save me just under a gallon of oil on a refill.



The rock vice and slide mechanism is not sow so the bottom of pan can be seen.

Report Spam   Logged
Taogem
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 12343



« Reply #8 on: December 26, 2008, 02:34:54 pm »

I will have to try some of the Mineral Oil for animals ... where do you find it?


I find mine at our local Feed store. It runs about 11.00 a gallon.

When I clean out my saw will be using the brick idea. That will save me as much as a couple gallons.
Report Spam   Logged

travelerga
Guest
« Reply #9 on: December 26, 2008, 02:59:53 pm »

I do the brick trick withot the silicon.. the horse laxative is nice in the hands too. LOL
Report Spam   Logged
mirkaba
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2303



« Reply #10 on: December 26, 2008, 04:19:38 pm »

I used bricks also until I found the less expensive oil. The club was getting a break on bulk log and shingle oil at a local oil company. Found out it was mostly mineral oil so we get bulk mineral oil for about 6.50 a gallon now.........Bob
Report Spam   Logged

Bob

Gathering dust in Montana.
Bluesssman
Guest
« Reply #11 on: December 26, 2008, 05:33:44 pm »

Before I knew any better (not that I do now) I used water soluble oil in my trim saw. I mixed it 10 parts water to one part oil. I have been using the same blade for about 6 months and many many rocks. It is the same oil I use for my milling machine and lathe. I bought 5 gallons at about $18 a gallon. Works out to about $1.64 a gallon. I will be using mineral oil for the big slab saw. Just thought I would offer the thought...
Report Spam   Logged
theimage1
Guest
« Reply #12 on: December 26, 2008, 08:13:33 pm »

I originally did the bricks without the silicon bead, but I found in a few months they often shifted and several times they hit the bottom of the saw. It didn't hurt the saw but messed up a couple of brick pretty well. And when they first make contact they can make quite a noise. I eventually decide to "fence them in".


Report Spam   Logged
bobby1
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3606


« Reply #13 on: January 03, 2009, 09:55:50 pm »

I don't use the bricks because I want a longer cutting time between oil changes. I recycle the oil by filtering it through a doubled paper bag/bucket arrangement. I can usually recover about 85% of the oil for reuse.
Bob
Report Spam   Logged

theimage1
Guest
« Reply #14 on: January 04, 2009, 12:39:48 am »

I do the same thing, I "scoop-out" the bottom of the saw and put the sludge in a couple of nested paper bags. I let the oil run out the bottom through a perforated 5 gal bucket into a second 5 gal bucket. After a few days I put some additional weight on the folded over bags and get some more oil out. After several week I take the remaining sludge and pack it off to the dump inside a couple trash bags. I've never gotten close to 85% recovery, but usually about 50% if it all goes well.

I usually wash the bricks off with a hose and let them sun dry for a couple days while the oil separates.
Report Spam   Logged
mirkaba
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2303



« Reply #15 on: January 04, 2009, 09:11:47 am »

I bent apiece of expanded metal to form a vee and bought a bunch of old vacuum cleaner bags at the thrift shop. The vee sits in the top of the 5 gal. bucket and the bag sits in the vee. The more often I clean the sludge out the better my oil recovery . I guess because there is less impacted fine slkudge to lock up the oil. Our local stores no longer have a paper bag option so I have not tried them. I hear they are faster..........Bob
Report Spam   Logged

Bob

Gathering dust in Montana.


Pages: 1 2 [All]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum | Buy traffic for your forum/website

Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy