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Lapidary / Gemstone Community Forum
April 23, 2019, 02:15:42 pm
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Cleaning saws! YUK!!!

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Author Topic: Cleaning saws! YUK!!!  (Read 3375 times)
denny
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« Reply #30 on: October 07, 2012, 12:21:41 pm »

Denny, I have seen the ad for that filtering system, and would also have a hard time justifying the cost.
Money better spent on rocks or looking for rocks!  yippie

Kinda what I thought also, but then I've only had my saw for two weeks and haven't cleaned it yet.  I may change my mind after cleaning it the first time! help  My manual says to clean the oil when it gets dirty but that makes no sense to me.  It got dirty on my second rock, a brown wonderstone and then got worse on a Woodward Ranch plume agate, and...well, you get the drift.  Is there a rule of thumb when saws should be cleaned?  I guess more to the point is how often should the oil be drained, filtered and replaced?
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hulagrub
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« Reply #31 on: October 07, 2012, 12:45:46 pm »

Denny, for me, I know it is time when the blade is picking up mud instead of oil. As long as you are getting clean lubricant, things should be ok!
Am envious of you having a NEW saw, especially an HP, but then we got our Lortone 12" new. Also have a 20" HP that Tony from Idaho Rockshop rebuilt for me and it was like new after he finished it.
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light house jack
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« Reply #32 on: July 02, 2014, 10:19:10 am »

After draining my 18" saw, I then take a spatula and scrape all of the gunk off that I can.  I then spray everything with engine cleaner. I let it sit a bit, then drag my hose pipe in the house and just give it a good spray several times going out to dump the five gallon bucket of oil and water in  my flower beds.  After repeating this process several times the saw is bright and shiny clean.
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Michael S Hoover - Redrummd
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« Reply #33 on: July 02, 2014, 11:16:16 am »

Honestly, saws do not need to be fully cleaned - EVER.  I have not drained my saws in many years.

In an evening after a day of cutting I simple use a board to scrape the mud forward to the saw front after every few running hours.  I then use a one quart plastic container to scoop out the thickest mud which is usually two to three gallons in my big saws.  I replace that with clean oil.

By the next morning the "fine stuff" in the oil has settled out.  My saws run so clean that I only need to use a squeegee to clean the plexiglass tops about once every 20 hours of run time.

The mud I remove is left standing in a bucket and I pour off the clean oil that rises to the surface.  After a few month the bucket has about a gallon to 2 gallons of thick mud that I scrape out with a garden trowel and I bag it and send it with the trash to the CLAY lined landfill.
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« Reply #34 on: July 02, 2014, 12:03:23 pm »

Honestly, saws do not need to be fully cleaned - EVER.  I have not drained my saws in many years.

In an evening after a day of cutting I simple use a board to scrape the mud forward to the saw front after every few running hours.  I then use a one quart plastic container to scoop out the thickest mud which is usually two to three gallons in my big saws.  I replace that with clean oil.

By the next morning the "fine stuff" in the oil has settled out.  My saws run so clean that I only need to use a squeegee to clean the plexiglass tops about once every 20 hours of run time.

The mud I remove is left standing in a bucket and I pour off the clean oil that rises to the surface.  After a few month the bucket has about a gallon to 2 gallons of thick mud that I scrape out with a garden trowel and I bag it and send it with the trash to the CLAY lined landfill.

My sentiments exactly. The last cleaning was for moving and I am not going to do that anymore either. Just load and go with a cover so the rain water does not get inside. I have to admit that vacuuming the sludge out and then pouring the oil back is less messy with my Lortone 12. I can get pretty black trying to scrape the sludge back to where I can dip it out.
Jim
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fwfranklen
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« Reply #35 on: July 28, 2014, 01:53:23 pm »

I still like a clean saw "every-now-and-again" I was told by an old timer...but he used diesel and Hydraulic oil. That if prolongs the ware on the blade to keep the oil filtered. When I get rich I might purchase on of these...follow link.

http://www.hplapidary.com/c/107/everclean-oil-cleaning-system


Mike
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« Reply #36 on: July 28, 2014, 02:43:29 pm »

Well if I could afford it I would get one.  I also like clean saws but I don't enjoy cleaning them.  I'm a paper bagger at the time.
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« Reply #37 on: July 29, 2014, 12:57:47 am »

I have been using neat Honing oil (mineral oil) in a 14" Lortone for the last few years, it does an excellent job but is not cheap.

The oil tends to maintain the rock cutting in suspension, only settling over time.

A couple of weeks back I dropped about a gallon of used automotive transmission oil in the sump.

The effect seems to be that the rubbish settles out really quick and can be scraped up about 1/2 thick making it much easier in the clean up.

I am a paper bagger as well, putting the used oil in paper bags suspended in plastic bags over an empty drum and throw away when putty like similar to Michael.
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« Reply #38 on: July 29, 2014, 03:53:14 pm »

I still like a clean saw "every-now-and-again" I was told by an old timer...but he used diesel and Hydraulic oil. That if prolongs the ware on the blade to keep the oil filtered. When I get rich I might purchase on of these...follow link.

http://www.hplapidary.com/c/107/everclean-oil-cleaning-system


Mike

I'm going down to Austin tomorrow to pick up a new 12"/14"/16" HP saw with one of the oil-cleaning systems on it. I'll try to report on it when I get it up and running.

Saw one at the Rock Show in Tulsa and it's been preying on my mind.   thinking13
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fwfranklen
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« Reply #39 on: July 29, 2014, 04:56:26 pm »

send pictures on the oil cleaning setup. Would love to see it and how it works.  yippie

Mike
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Coleopterist
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« Reply #40 on: March 01, 2015, 04:28:55 pm »

Hi,
I'm a new member on the forum, and new to lapidary too.  I bought a "vintage" Beacon Star, 14" saw, back in January, and have been running it day and night cutting rock.  I've cleaned it out twice since January, but not until the blade started picking up crud, and isn't looking like clean oil on the blade anymore as it cuts. I use the paper bag method to filter the oil.   I use a couple of Home Depot orange colored buckets with inserts I built out of scrap stuff in my workshop.  It took me 1/2 hour to build three of them.  I've attached photos.  I went to Walmart and bought a couple of their pet food scoops, they work incredibly well for mucking out the bottom of my saw after I've drained off what oil will drain out on it's own.  I highly recommend the scoops.  I don't even get my hands dirty mucking out my saw!  I drain what oil will drain out on it's own through the drain hole, into one of the sacks in a bucket, then scoop out what is left into my second bucket setup.  I use an old paintbrush to brush the last of the goop into the scoop, kinda like using a dust pan and broom.  I leave the bags full of oil and goop over night for the oil to filter out, there is always some "clean" oil on top of the muck the next morning, too, and I gently dump that into the saw, then chuck the sacks full of crud, and re-use the filtered oil.  My saw oil basin is quite small, so it only takes me a few minutes to clean it out, but I have to wait overnight for the oil to filter through the sack before I can refill the saw. 

This morning I created some inserts for the oil basin in my saw, to hold bricks, to take up some of the oil volume.  I used some extra bamboo flooring material left over from my living room floor, and cut notches that interlock to create a holder in my oil basin, such that the bricks can't move around.  It makes it such that I don't have to have so much oil in the darn thing (usually about three gallons) to make it work right.  I will need to clean it more often, but it will not take anywhere near as much oil now.  If anyone is interested in the brick holding device I built for my oil basin, email me at jayr.mcclellan@gmail.com, and I'll send photos.


* Saw Cleaning setup 009.JPG (604.39 KB, 1024x768 - viewed 4 times.)

* Saw Cleaning setup 001.JPG (571.45 KB, 1024x768 - viewed 3 times.)

* Saw Cleaning setup 003.JPG (503.27 KB, 1024x768 - viewed 3 times.)

* Saw Cleaning setup 008.JPG (416.47 KB, 1024x768 - viewed 3 times.)

* Saw Cleaning setup 009.JPG (604.39 KB, 1024x768 - viewed 3 times.)

* Saw Cleaning setup 006.JPG (514.05 KB, 768x1024 - viewed 3 times.)
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« Reply #41 on: March 01, 2015, 04:47:42 pm »

 On my 18" Highland Park, i use food grade mineral oil which is totally non toxic, i drain it into a 5 gal. bucket then take a scoop and clean out the goop at the bottom of the saw.  I then pour this on my plants outside and they do not seem to mind. I then spray everything down with automotive engine cleaner, let it soak then drag in a garden hose and spray everything down letting everything go into the same bucket. I end up with a sparkling clean saw in every part.
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« Reply #42 on: March 02, 2015, 06:33:57 am »

My 24" HP drains into a two bucket cascade system and is pumped back to spray directly to both sides of the blade.  I finally scraped about an inch of scale off the bottom when we moved to Texas last summer.  It had the texture of semi damp compound.  Getting it clean allowed me to pack stuff inside for the move.  That was the first time I had spent any real time on cleaning since the installation of the system.  The upper bucket is only 1/2 gallon, so it needs to be replaced and allowed to settle and then filter after a full day a slabbing.  I have several 1/2 gallon buckets for the purpose.  If I don't get it changed in time the pump will see dirty oil.  That works, but I let it happen too many times and wound up having to replace the worn out pump.  I use nothing but straight mineral oil as my skin has become sensitive to the additives in other oils.
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« Reply #43 on: March 02, 2015, 11:10:30 am »

Good idea slabbercabber!
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« Reply #44 on: March 05, 2016, 06:32:51 pm »

Talusman
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