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Cleaning saws! YUK!!!

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hulagrub
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« on: August 19, 2012, 07:50:11 pm »

Have been putting off cleaning out the saws since spring. The 1st pic is my 12" Lortone and the reason I have been putting it off is because the cuts were of psilomosloppy and a meteorite and it was really gunky.

Then the 20" and the 16" drop saw and about worked the sucker bucket to death.



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« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2012, 09:30:54 am »


I had to clean out my 18" 3 times so far this year and it looks now almost as bad as your 20" Dave. I gave up on my suction bucket as my vaccum didn't have enough vaccum to get it done. Cheap vac!!!!!!!!  saved5  It takes me about 3 hours each time to get it done so it's not too bad, just dirty. I love to slab rocks though.

I'll have to get back on the suction bucket route and get it going like it's supposed to.   saved4

Don

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« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2012, 01:12:26 pm »


Have not tried the suction bucket bit yet.  I think (yes I know..I should quit thinking) it is just another piece you have to clean.  I let the saw sit for a week then drain the oil out into my brown bag strainer.  Then scrape the rest out into the garbage.  Last of all I take rags to it and wipe everything down real well, two, three times.

Gary
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« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2012, 10:03:10 am »

Geez Dave...I only 'thought' my saws were nasty.

Maybe you should switch to a square bucket and smaller shop vac....and give that puppy a rest now and then.
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« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2012, 11:01:35 am »

Ah you guys - this looks like one of those perfect jobs where you find that neighbor kid and offer him/her some money to do it for you. Kids work cheap (here they do anyway) and if they're in school you can pay them min/wage and they're making more than most places here will (there's some second min wage for school kids - way low) pay them.

Not to sound like an oil freak but it's the sort of thing I'd have been thrilled to do when I was a youngster. The messier the better, ha  ha...

Nowdays the inverse is true. Same for how long it takes.
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« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2012, 01:22:56 pm »

What Nancie said!!!   She loaned me her 'sucker'!  Works Great! yes yes yes

Poured the resulting glop into a 5 gallon bucket that has holes drilled in the bottom and lined with brown paper bag.  Set that on top of another 5 gallon bucket with an inverted milk crate on it as support for the top bucket.   Oil filters into the lower bucket, clean as a whistle, and poured back into the saw.   When glop finally stops draining, you can bag up what is left for the trash, use it to burn a stump or recycle as you see fit.
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« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2012, 01:59:02 pm »

I hate it too so I just don't do it. Well almost never do it. I let it go until there is an inch of rock in the bottom then chip it out with a putty knife. I have a 12 inch Lortone and there is no drain so the only way to get it out is with an arm stuck in all the way to the shoulder. It is made so the working part can be lifted out of the bottom tub but I would have to have a come along attached to the ceiling to lift it out. Plus, I have the whole thing bolted down to the stand so it does not shift around and get the belt out of alinement. What they need to make is a disposable saw so it can just be thrown away and use a new one. When I clean out again I think I will remove the working part, put a plastic liner in the tub then set the working part back in. That way when I clean it I can just scrape everything into the tub, get my son to lift out the working part then all I have to do is lift out the plastic like a bag and pour off the oil and toss the rest. Right now I am way past time to clean because I have a quarter inch of sludge sticking to the cover and it is going to start falling off onto me when I am changing rocks. Maybe I will just quit cutting rocks because that job really sucks. Then again, probably not because somebody has to cut all these rocks. They can't be just left laying there like a dead fish. They could spoil and start to stink then I would have to move. Moving sucks worse than cleaning the saw so I guess I will go and clean my saw. I really wish you would not have reminded me. dunno hide dunno hide dunno hide
Jim
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« Reply #7 on: September 29, 2012, 07:51:48 pm »

Yup about that time for my slab saw.  Really, thanks for reminding me how greasy a job it is.  Don't mind the work, its the cost of putting new lapidary oil in that bits.
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« Reply #8 on: September 29, 2012, 08:08:03 pm »

I hate it too so I just don't do it. Well almost never do it. I let it go until there is an inch of rock in the bottom then chip it out with a putty knife. I have a 12 inch Lortone and there is no drain so the only way to get it out is with an arm stuck in all the way to the shoulder. It is made so the working part can be lifted out of the bottom tub but I would have to have a come along attached to the ceiling to lift it out. Plus, I have the whole thing bolted down to the stand so it does not shift around and get the belt out of alinement. What they need to make is a disposable saw so it can just be thrown away and use a new one. When I clean out again I think I will remove the working part, put a plastic liner in the tub then set the working part back in. That way when I clean it I can just scrape everything into the tub, get my son to lift out the working part then all I have to do is lift out the plastic like a bag and pour off the oil and toss the rest. Right now I am way past time to clean because I have a quarter inch of sludge sticking to the cover and it is going to start falling off onto me when I am changing rocks. Maybe I will just quit cutting rocks because that job really sucks. Then again, probably not because somebody has to cut all these rocks. They can't be just left laying there like a dead fish. They could spoil and start to stink then I would have to move. Moving sucks worse than cleaning the saw so I guess I will go and clean my saw. I really wish you would not have reminded me. dunno hide dunno hide dunno hide
Jim
I have to clean my 12" as well but don't worry about your rocks spoiling, I will come pick them up and make sure they get lots of love.
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« Reply #9 on: September 29, 2012, 08:09:25 pm »

Yup about that time for my slab saw.  Really, thanks for reminding me how greasy a job it is.  Don't mind the work, its the cost of putting new lapidary oil in that bits.

Helene!  RECYCLE!!!  filter the oil and put it back in the saw!!!
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« Reply #10 on: September 29, 2012, 11:42:12 pm »

Had my 14" Lortone for a few years now, haven't emptied the m/c although I've used it for hundreds of hours.

About once a week I use a small plastic scoop (that comes with laundry detergent powder) to scrape the mud that has settled out of the oil and fill a paper bag sitting in a kitchen strainer. Leave sitting in m/c overnight, half the oil will then have drained.

Next step is place the paper bag in a plastic bag with holes in bottom and suspend in another container to catch remainder of oil.

I have bags hanging for months, until the mud starts to set. No waste in this household.

To get things really clean wipe down using a cloth and clean out in the clean oil sitting in the m/c.
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« Reply #11 on: September 30, 2012, 12:00:52 am »

Somebody needs to loan me (you know - just for a few years) one of those whopper saws so I can gripe and moan instead of pissing about cleaning 7" and 10" saws (poor me - sha...).

I liked the idea of scooping regularly rather than all out cleaning. I would try to put a drain hole on anything that didn't have one but not having one I can't tell if that's really a good idea or not - certainly wouldn't be hard.

Something for gadgeteers - why not a pump that runs when the saw does (and maybe for a bit after) that runs oil through a series of filters in-situ? First a diesel fuel line filter (which, if you're in the market for sieve material btw, is a cheap way to get some fine mesh by the sheet rather than the 100' roll) then progressively smaller. Just a thought...
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« Reply #12 on: September 30, 2012, 12:17:16 am »

I know this is a silly question Mia, how do you filter the oil.  This will be my first time that I need to change the oil.  Allen I'm going to reread your process did not quite understand.
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« Reply #13 on: September 30, 2012, 07:05:17 am »

Helene, the simplest way is to put the oil in a bucket and scoop off the clean oil when the goop settles to the bottom leaving the clean oil on top. The cleanest way is to dump oil and sludge in a paper bag that is suspended over a bucket or sitting in something like a dish drainer sitting in a small tub. There are probably a hundred variations of these methods and all will work. Just buy a second batch of oil to put in the saw while the first batch is filtering or settling then every time you clean the saw you have clean oil to put back in. I do not use my saw constantly so I just wait for the oil to settle out and put it back in. You will loose a little every time but it doesn't amount to much. I pay $22 per gallon so there is no way I am going to throw any of it away.

I have a dish drainer sitting in a tub so I have somewhere to put the rocks when I take them out of the clamp. The oil drains down off of them into the tub within a couple of days. Then they either go out the door (bad rock) or get put in the slab grabber so I can cut the last of the stone. I have a lot of bad stones here because of too many fractures and I do not want to throw away the oil that is left on all of them. It doesn't amount to very much because my saw is not running constantly but every little bit helps. I can see that if my saw was running constantly there would be a lot of oil collected in that tub.
Jim
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« Reply #14 on: September 30, 2012, 07:06:57 am »

What I do is drill some holes in an appropriate sized bucket and put in a sturdy paper grocery bag.  Suspend said bucket over another bucket using saw horses or something.
Pour the saw snot into the top bucket...the paper bag will become saturated with oil and the remainder will drip into the catch bucket.
This will take some time.  I recover appx. 50%.


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« Reply #15 on: September 30, 2012, 08:23:24 am »

Quote
Something for gadgeteers - why not a pump that runs when the saw does (and maybe for a bit after) that runs oil through a series of filters in-situ? First a diesel fuel line filter (which, if you're in the market for sieve material btw, is a cheap way to get some fine mesh by the sheet rather than the 100' roll) then progressively smaller. Just a thought...
That has been in my thought processes, but time is at a premium for me.
The paper bag works wonderfully for me. When I started this thread, I had bought a 5 gal bucket of hydraulic oil, but never used any of it, because I had enough recycled oil for both my 12" Lortone and the 20" HP.
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« Reply #16 on: September 30, 2012, 09:59:24 am »

 Jim and Nanci thank you so much for the pictures and explanation.  Very helpful.  I can do that and save money to boot. ura   $22 a gallon and it takes more than one to fill the slab saw.  Well worth recycling.  Dave you posted this just at the right time, for the first oil change.
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« Reply #17 on: September 30, 2012, 11:15:10 am »

Helene, have you ever considered ISO 32 hydraulic oil? Usually $30-35 per 5 gallon bucket.
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« Reply #18 on: September 30, 2012, 06:01:43 pm »

Dave Looked up the Hydraulic Fluid you suggested and It's 100 percent biodegradeable.  A huge plus!  Does it have a strong odor?  Below is some info from the manufacturer.  This bit of info just saved me $65.  ura ura ura
 

United Bio Lube's Bio AW Hydraulic Fluid - ISO 32 is a non-hazardous, biobased hydraulic fluid engineered for Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) and used in Military, Manufacturing, Construction, Forestry, Marine, and Agriculture industries.

Bio AW Hydraulic Fluid - ISO 32 is a 100% Ultimate3 Biodegradable hydraulic fluid made from U.S.D.A. sponsored High Oleic Base Stocks (HOBS)1 and processed with patented Stabilized chemistry for high performance and fluid longevity.

Bio AW Hydraulic Fluid - ISO 32 allows governments, manufacturers, and companies to:

Gain substantial performance enhancements in Hydraulic Power Systems
Reduce overall impact and footprint on the environment
Lower toxic exposures to workers
Meet compliance with Green Purchasing regulations.
Safe, reliable, affordable, and available in all quantities today, Bio AW Hydraulic Fluid - ISO 32 is setting new industry standards for:


Performance
Environmental Protection
Worker Health & Safety
Economic Sustainability
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« Reply #19 on: September 30, 2012, 08:34:18 pm »

I wonder where a person could purchase that brand. Mine just comes from the farm store and is just a thin hydraulic fluid, but recycles wonderfully.
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« Reply #20 on: October 01, 2012, 09:55:17 am »

I wonder where a person could purchase that brand. Mine just comes from the farm store and is just a thin hydraulic fluid, but recycles wonderfully.

It seems like I used the AW-32 Hydro Fluid some years ago and changed to Mineral Oil for some reason. Does the swarf, sawing residue, stay suspended in the AW-32? It will not settle out in the mineral oil which causes the saw to be a complete mess and requires cleaning more often. I used transmission fluid years ago all the swarf would settle out and my saw stayed cleaned longer but it smelled to high heaven and had some skin problem possibilitys.

I'm posting a couple of photo's of my reclaim system. I purchased the storage container from WalMart, less than $10, used a small sabre saw and cut a hole for the 5gal bucket to fit. The hole in my lid has opened up some and sits too low so I prop it up with some wood scraps, don't cut the hole too large.

The unit...........


The bucket.........1/2" random drilled holes...........


39don
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« Reply #21 on: October 01, 2012, 05:02:12 pm »

Is the ISO 32 red? I was an aircraft hydraulic mechanic in the Marine Corps and the fluid at that time was red. That was a pile of years ago so it probably was not ISO 32 but the red was added so the leaks could be found easier. There was not a white T-shirt to be found in our shop because it stained everything.

I think I will change over from the mineral oil because that price is good and if the saw stays cleaner longer that is worth a hundred bucks right there. I may have to drive 50 miles to find it but it would still be worth the trip.
Jim
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« Reply #22 on: October 01, 2012, 06:00:10 pm »

I wonder where a person could purchase that brand. Mine just comes from the farm store and is just a thin hydraulic fluid, but recycles wonderfully.

It will not settle out in the mineral oil which causes the saw to be a complete mess and requires cleaning more often. I used transmission fluid years ago all the swarf would settle out and my saw stayed cleaned longer but it smelled to high heaven and had some skin problem possibilitys.

I'm posting a couple of photo's of my reclaim system. I purchased the storage container from WalMart, less than $10, used a small sabre saw and cut a hole for the 5gal bucket to fit. The hole in my lid has opened up some and sits too low so I prop it up with some wood scraps, don't cut the hole too large.

39don

Hi Jim,

I use mineral oil not AW-32. The mineral oil has no smell but it does require cleaning the saw sooner than some other coolants. The swarf will not settle out in mineral oil so the saw will get dirtier quicker. I get my mineral oil from WalMart for $1.48 pint or for a total of $11.48 gal. plus tax. WalMart here doesn't stock more than 6 pints at any one time. When I do visit WalMart I always buy 2 to 4 pints so I will have enough make-up oil on the next cleanout.

The red color came from me using a quart of power steering fluid about 6 months ago cause I was too lazy to go to WalMart which is a 10 mile trip.

39don
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« Reply #23 on: October 02, 2012, 06:19:43 am »

Thanks for the explanation and the tip where to buy. Wal Mart is 55 miles for me so the cost of fuel would be to high.

Does the ISO 32 have a bad smell? My saw is in the house so another smell besides me would not be good. lol
Jim
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« Reply #24 on: October 02, 2012, 06:44:17 pm »


I use hydraulic oil from Car Quest.  No smell.  I use rubber gloves but It doesn't seem to irritate my skin.

The local farm store carries clear mineral oil to give to your horse, and it runs 16 bucks a gallon.

Gary
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« Reply #25 on: October 02, 2012, 07:45:04 pm »

Don, with the 32, I get quite a layer of sludge stuck to the bottom of the saw. Some particulate suspension but overall not too bad. That is except for psilomelane or psilomesloppy as I call it. It's readily available at farm stores. I really like the MFA brand if you have one nearby.
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« Reply #26 on: October 03, 2012, 10:15:24 pm »


Roger on the sludge.

Gary
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« Reply #27 on: October 04, 2012, 06:50:32 am »

I am using mineral oil (horsey stuff) that costs me $22 a gallon here in this tiny town of no competition so prices are high for everything. Having an abundance of rock is not always a good thing. Back on the subject, I get sludge buildup on the saw cover as well as everywhere else. After a clean out it only takes about two cuts and i can no longer see through the window. I am thinking that a lighter oil would be better for the junk getting to the bottom of the saw. I suppose that if I cleaned the saw frequently I would not have that problem but like the headline says (cleaning saws YUK!!!!) so I am trying to avoid the cleanings as much as possible. I am thinking that there are two ways to go about that and one is a lighter oil. The other is going to a filtering system so I never have to clean the saw. Lighter oil and a filtering system both would probably be the best. I have a Lortone saw that is almost impossible to clean without hauling it to the car wash. I am thinking about hammering a low spot in the center of the saw tub and putting in a drain. Then I could have the oil drain into one bucket then an overflow from that bucket to another bucket with a pump in it to pump it back up to the saw. If the oil is light enough the heavy particles will settle out in the first bucket. I do not run my saw a lot so the gunk would have time to settle out when the saw is not running.

My trim saw and polisher operates about the same way except for a tub under the blade and polisher instead of two buckets. It uses water instead of oil so the gunk settles out very fast but I think that with having two buckets with the oil it would work about the same way. If two buckets is not enough then I could go to three. The area under my saw stand probably has enough room for four buckets so room is not a problem. With the lighter oil the pump would not have a problem pumping it back up to the saw. The more I think about this the more I want to make this a winter project. A swamp cooler pump, a few bulkhead fittings and five or six feet of hose would be really cheap. If I can not get the bottom of the saw tub hammered down far enough I will have to braze a fitting onto the bottom but I have friends with torches. I spent half of my life melting metal so it would be an easy fix. Wow, I think ya'll have talked me into this project. Thanks for brainstorming this with me. I am going to start looking for parts today.
Jim
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« Reply #28 on: October 07, 2012, 07:20:23 am »

I use Texaco, now Chevron Bright NHG in my new HP 16" saw.  I get it from a distributor in Austin for $69 for five gallons.  Also regarding the saw, it comes with an option that filters and cleans the oil as the saw is cutting.  It's a $750 option that I may invest in sometime in the future.   Had I known about it when I ordered the saw I would've bought it then.  For really heavy users (of the saw, not in terms of personal weight lol), this could save quite a bit of money in terms of time and effort.  For someone like me who cuts about 8-10 slabs a day, I have a hard time justifying it other than saying that I want it.
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« Reply #29 on: October 07, 2012, 08:18:05 am »

Denny, I have seen the ad for that filtering system, and would also have a hard time justifying the cost.
Money better spent on rocks or looking for rocks!  yippie
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« Reply #30 on: October 07, 2012, 12:21:41 pm »

Denny, I have seen the ad for that filtering system, and would also have a hard time justifying the cost.
Money better spent on rocks or looking for rocks!  yippie

Kinda what I thought also, but then I've only had my saw for two weeks and haven't cleaned it yet.  I may change my mind after cleaning it the first time! help  My manual says to clean the oil when it gets dirty but that makes no sense to me.  It got dirty on my second rock, a brown wonderstone and then got worse on a Woodward Ranch plume agate, and...well, you get the drift.  Is there a rule of thumb when saws should be cleaned?  I guess more to the point is how often should the oil be drained, filtered and replaced?
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« Reply #31 on: October 07, 2012, 12:45:46 pm »

Denny, for me, I know it is time when the blade is picking up mud instead of oil. As long as you are getting clean lubricant, things should be ok!
Am envious of you having a NEW saw, especially an HP, but then we got our Lortone 12" new. Also have a 20" HP that Tony from Idaho Rockshop rebuilt for me and it was like new after he finished it.
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« Reply #32 on: July 02, 2014, 10:19:10 am »

After draining my 18" saw, I then take a spatula and scrape all of the gunk off that I can.  I then spray everything with engine cleaner. I let it sit a bit, then drag my hose pipe in the house and just give it a good spray several times going out to dump the five gallon bucket of oil and water in  my flower beds.  After repeating this process several times the saw is bright and shiny clean.
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« Reply #33 on: July 02, 2014, 11:16:16 am »

Honestly, saws do not need to be fully cleaned - EVER.  I have not drained my saws in many years.

In an evening after a day of cutting I simple use a board to scrape the mud forward to the saw front after every few running hours.  I then use a one quart plastic container to scoop out the thickest mud which is usually two to three gallons in my big saws.  I replace that with clean oil.

By the next morning the "fine stuff" in the oil has settled out.  My saws run so clean that I only need to use a squeegee to clean the plexiglass tops about once every 20 hours of run time.

The mud I remove is left standing in a bucket and I pour off the clean oil that rises to the surface.  After a few month the bucket has about a gallon to 2 gallons of thick mud that I scrape out with a garden trowel and I bag it and send it with the trash to the CLAY lined landfill.
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« Reply #34 on: July 02, 2014, 12:03:23 pm »

Honestly, saws do not need to be fully cleaned - EVER.  I have not drained my saws in many years.

In an evening after a day of cutting I simple use a board to scrape the mud forward to the saw front after every few running hours.  I then use a one quart plastic container to scoop out the thickest mud which is usually two to three gallons in my big saws.  I replace that with clean oil.

By the next morning the "fine stuff" in the oil has settled out.  My saws run so clean that I only need to use a squeegee to clean the plexiglass tops about once every 20 hours of run time.

The mud I remove is left standing in a bucket and I pour off the clean oil that rises to the surface.  After a few month the bucket has about a gallon to 2 gallons of thick mud that I scrape out with a garden trowel and I bag it and send it with the trash to the CLAY lined landfill.

My sentiments exactly. The last cleaning was for moving and I am not going to do that anymore either. Just load and go with a cover so the rain water does not get inside. I have to admit that vacuuming the sludge out and then pouring the oil back is less messy with my Lortone 12. I can get pretty black trying to scrape the sludge back to where I can dip it out.
Jim
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« Reply #35 on: July 28, 2014, 01:53:23 pm »

I still like a clean saw "every-now-and-again" I was told by an old timer...but he used diesel and Hydraulic oil. That if prolongs the ware on the blade to keep the oil filtered. When I get rich I might purchase on of these...follow link.

http://www.hplapidary.com/c/107/everclean-oil-cleaning-system


Mike
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« Reply #36 on: July 28, 2014, 02:43:29 pm »

Well if I could afford it I would get one.  I also like clean saws but I don't enjoy cleaning them.  I'm a paper bagger at the time.
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« Reply #37 on: July 29, 2014, 12:57:47 am »

I have been using neat Honing oil (mineral oil) in a 14" Lortone for the last few years, it does an excellent job but is not cheap.

The oil tends to maintain the rock cutting in suspension, only settling over time.

A couple of weeks back I dropped about a gallon of used automotive transmission oil in the sump.

The effect seems to be that the rubbish settles out really quick and can be scraped up about 1/2 thick making it much easier in the clean up.

I am a paper bagger as well, putting the used oil in paper bags suspended in plastic bags over an empty drum and throw away when putty like similar to Michael.
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« Reply #38 on: July 29, 2014, 03:53:14 pm »

I still like a clean saw "every-now-and-again" I was told by an old timer...but he used diesel and Hydraulic oil. That if prolongs the ware on the blade to keep the oil filtered. When I get rich I might purchase on of these...follow link.

http://www.hplapidary.com/c/107/everclean-oil-cleaning-system


Mike

I'm going down to Austin tomorrow to pick up a new 12"/14"/16" HP saw with one of the oil-cleaning systems on it. I'll try to report on it when I get it up and running.

Saw one at the Rock Show in Tulsa and it's been preying on my mind.   thinking13
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« Reply #39 on: July 29, 2014, 04:56:26 pm »

send pictures on the oil cleaning setup. Would love to see it and how it works.  yippie

Mike
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« Reply #40 on: March 01, 2015, 04:28:55 pm »

Hi,
I'm a new member on the forum, and new to lapidary too.  I bought a "vintage" Beacon Star, 14" saw, back in January, and have been running it day and night cutting rock.  I've cleaned it out twice since January, but not until the blade started picking up crud, and isn't looking like clean oil on the blade anymore as it cuts. I use the paper bag method to filter the oil.   I use a couple of Home Depot orange colored buckets with inserts I built out of scrap stuff in my workshop.  It took me 1/2 hour to build three of them.  I've attached photos.  I went to Walmart and bought a couple of their pet food scoops, they work incredibly well for mucking out the bottom of my saw after I've drained off what oil will drain out on it's own.  I highly recommend the scoops.  I don't even get my hands dirty mucking out my saw!  I drain what oil will drain out on it's own through the drain hole, into one of the sacks in a bucket, then scoop out what is left into my second bucket setup.  I use an old paintbrush to brush the last of the goop into the scoop, kinda like using a dust pan and broom.  I leave the bags full of oil and goop over night for the oil to filter out, there is always some "clean" oil on top of the muck the next morning, too, and I gently dump that into the saw, then chuck the sacks full of crud, and re-use the filtered oil.  My saw oil basin is quite small, so it only takes me a few minutes to clean it out, but I have to wait overnight for the oil to filter through the sack before I can refill the saw. 

This morning I created some inserts for the oil basin in my saw, to hold bricks, to take up some of the oil volume.  I used some extra bamboo flooring material left over from my living room floor, and cut notches that interlock to create a holder in my oil basin, such that the bricks can't move around.  It makes it such that I don't have to have so much oil in the darn thing (usually about three gallons) to make it work right.  I will need to clean it more often, but it will not take anywhere near as much oil now.  If anyone is interested in the brick holding device I built for my oil basin, email me at jayr.mcclellan@gmail.com, and I'll send photos.


* Saw Cleaning setup 009.JPG (604.39 KB, 1024x768 - viewed 4 times.)

* Saw Cleaning setup 001.JPG (571.45 KB, 1024x768 - viewed 3 times.)

* Saw Cleaning setup 003.JPG (503.27 KB, 1024x768 - viewed 3 times.)

* Saw Cleaning setup 008.JPG (416.47 KB, 1024x768 - viewed 3 times.)

* Saw Cleaning setup 009.JPG (604.39 KB, 1024x768 - viewed 3 times.)

* Saw Cleaning setup 006.JPG (514.05 KB, 768x1024 - viewed 3 times.)
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« Reply #41 on: March 01, 2015, 04:47:42 pm »

 On my 18" Highland Park, i use food grade mineral oil which is totally non toxic, i drain it into a 5 gal. bucket then take a scoop and clean out the goop at the bottom of the saw.  I then pour this on my plants outside and they do not seem to mind. I then spray everything down with automotive engine cleaner, let it soak then drag in a garden hose and spray everything down letting everything go into the same bucket. I end up with a sparkling clean saw in every part.
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« Reply #42 on: March 02, 2015, 06:33:57 am »

My 24" HP drains into a two bucket cascade system and is pumped back to spray directly to both sides of the blade.  I finally scraped about an inch of scale off the bottom when we moved to Texas last summer.  It had the texture of semi damp compound.  Getting it clean allowed me to pack stuff inside for the move.  That was the first time I had spent any real time on cleaning since the installation of the system.  The upper bucket is only 1/2 gallon, so it needs to be replaced and allowed to settle and then filter after a full day a slabbing.  I have several 1/2 gallon buckets for the purpose.  If I don't get it changed in time the pump will see dirty oil.  That works, but I let it happen too many times and wound up having to replace the worn out pump.  I use nothing but straight mineral oil as my skin has become sensitive to the additives in other oils.
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« Reply #43 on: March 02, 2015, 11:10:30 am »

Good idea slabbercabber!
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« Reply #44 on: March 05, 2016, 06:32:51 pm »

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