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February 17, 2019, 12:52:46 pm
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Cleaning saws! YUK!!!

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Author Topic: Cleaning saws! YUK!!!  (Read 3358 times)
hulagrub
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« on: August 19, 2012, 07:50:11 pm »

Have been putting off cleaning out the saws since spring. The 1st pic is my 12" Lortone and the reason I have been putting it off is because the cuts were of psilomosloppy and a meteorite and it was really gunky.

Then the 20" and the 16" drop saw and about worked the sucker bucket to death.



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« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2012, 09:30:54 am »


I had to clean out my 18" 3 times so far this year and it looks now almost as bad as your 20" Dave. I gave up on my suction bucket as my vaccum didn't have enough vaccum to get it done. Cheap vac!!!!!!!!  saved5  It takes me about 3 hours each time to get it done so it's not too bad, just dirty. I love to slab rocks though.

I'll have to get back on the suction bucket route and get it going like it's supposed to.   saved4

Don

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« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2012, 01:12:26 pm »


Have not tried the suction bucket bit yet.  I think (yes I know..I should quit thinking) it is just another piece you have to clean.  I let the saw sit for a week then drain the oil out into my brown bag strainer.  Then scrape the rest out into the garbage.  Last of all I take rags to it and wipe everything down real well, two, three times.

Gary
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« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2012, 10:03:10 am »

Geez Dave...I only 'thought' my saws were nasty.

Maybe you should switch to a square bucket and smaller shop vac....and give that puppy a rest now and then.
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Nancie
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« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2012, 11:01:35 am »

Ah you guys - this looks like one of those perfect jobs where you find that neighbor kid and offer him/her some money to do it for you. Kids work cheap (here they do anyway) and if they're in school you can pay them min/wage and they're making more than most places here will (there's some second min wage for school kids - way low) pay them.

Not to sound like an oil freak but it's the sort of thing I'd have been thrilled to do when I was a youngster. The messier the better, ha  ha...

Nowdays the inverse is true. Same for how long it takes.
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« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2012, 01:22:56 pm »

What Nancie said!!!   She loaned me her 'sucker'!  Works Great! yes yes yes

Poured the resulting glop into a 5 gallon bucket that has holes drilled in the bottom and lined with brown paper bag.  Set that on top of another 5 gallon bucket with an inverted milk crate on it as support for the top bucket.   Oil filters into the lower bucket, clean as a whistle, and poured back into the saw.   When glop finally stops draining, you can bag up what is left for the trash, use it to burn a stump or recycle as you see fit.
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« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2012, 01:59:02 pm »

I hate it too so I just don't do it. Well almost never do it. I let it go until there is an inch of rock in the bottom then chip it out with a putty knife. I have a 12 inch Lortone and there is no drain so the only way to get it out is with an arm stuck in all the way to the shoulder. It is made so the working part can be lifted out of the bottom tub but I would have to have a come along attached to the ceiling to lift it out. Plus, I have the whole thing bolted down to the stand so it does not shift around and get the belt out of alinement. What they need to make is a disposable saw so it can just be thrown away and use a new one. When I clean out again I think I will remove the working part, put a plastic liner in the tub then set the working part back in. That way when I clean it I can just scrape everything into the tub, get my son to lift out the working part then all I have to do is lift out the plastic like a bag and pour off the oil and toss the rest. Right now I am way past time to clean because I have a quarter inch of sludge sticking to the cover and it is going to start falling off onto me when I am changing rocks. Maybe I will just quit cutting rocks because that job really sucks. Then again, probably not because somebody has to cut all these rocks. They can't be just left laying there like a dead fish. They could spoil and start to stink then I would have to move. Moving sucks worse than cleaning the saw so I guess I will go and clean my saw. I really wish you would not have reminded me. dunno hide dunno hide dunno hide
Jim
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« Reply #7 on: September 29, 2012, 07:51:48 pm »

Yup about that time for my slab saw.  Really, thanks for reminding me how greasy a job it is.  Don't mind the work, its the cost of putting new lapidary oil in that bits.
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« Reply #8 on: September 29, 2012, 08:08:03 pm »

I hate it too so I just don't do it. Well almost never do it. I let it go until there is an inch of rock in the bottom then chip it out with a putty knife. I have a 12 inch Lortone and there is no drain so the only way to get it out is with an arm stuck in all the way to the shoulder. It is made so the working part can be lifted out of the bottom tub but I would have to have a come along attached to the ceiling to lift it out. Plus, I have the whole thing bolted down to the stand so it does not shift around and get the belt out of alinement. What they need to make is a disposable saw so it can just be thrown away and use a new one. When I clean out again I think I will remove the working part, put a plastic liner in the tub then set the working part back in. That way when I clean it I can just scrape everything into the tub, get my son to lift out the working part then all I have to do is lift out the plastic like a bag and pour off the oil and toss the rest. Right now I am way past time to clean because I have a quarter inch of sludge sticking to the cover and it is going to start falling off onto me when I am changing rocks. Maybe I will just quit cutting rocks because that job really sucks. Then again, probably not because somebody has to cut all these rocks. They can't be just left laying there like a dead fish. They could spoil and start to stink then I would have to move. Moving sucks worse than cleaning the saw so I guess I will go and clean my saw. I really wish you would not have reminded me. dunno hide dunno hide dunno hide
Jim
I have to clean my 12" as well but don't worry about your rocks spoiling, I will come pick them up and make sure they get lots of love.
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« Reply #9 on: September 29, 2012, 08:09:25 pm »

Yup about that time for my slab saw.  Really, thanks for reminding me how greasy a job it is.  Don't mind the work, its the cost of putting new lapidary oil in that bits.

Helene!  RECYCLE!!!  filter the oil and put it back in the saw!!!
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« Reply #10 on: September 29, 2012, 11:42:12 pm »

Had my 14" Lortone for a few years now, haven't emptied the m/c although I've used it for hundreds of hours.

About once a week I use a small plastic scoop (that comes with laundry detergent powder) to scrape the mud that has settled out of the oil and fill a paper bag sitting in a kitchen strainer. Leave sitting in m/c overnight, half the oil will then have drained.

Next step is place the paper bag in a plastic bag with holes in bottom and suspend in another container to catch remainder of oil.

I have bags hanging for months, until the mud starts to set. No waste in this household.

To get things really clean wipe down using a cloth and clean out in the clean oil sitting in the m/c.
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« Reply #11 on: September 30, 2012, 12:00:52 am »

Somebody needs to loan me (you know - just for a few years) one of those whopper saws so I can gripe and moan instead of pissing about cleaning 7" and 10" saws (poor me - sha...).

I liked the idea of scooping regularly rather than all out cleaning. I would try to put a drain hole on anything that didn't have one but not having one I can't tell if that's really a good idea or not - certainly wouldn't be hard.

Something for gadgeteers - why not a pump that runs when the saw does (and maybe for a bit after) that runs oil through a series of filters in-situ? First a diesel fuel line filter (which, if you're in the market for sieve material btw, is a cheap way to get some fine mesh by the sheet rather than the 100' roll) then progressively smaller. Just a thought...
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« Reply #12 on: September 30, 2012, 12:17:16 am »

I know this is a silly question Mia, how do you filter the oil.  This will be my first time that I need to change the oil.  Allen I'm going to reread your process did not quite understand.
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« Reply #13 on: September 30, 2012, 07:05:17 am »

Helene, the simplest way is to put the oil in a bucket and scoop off the clean oil when the goop settles to the bottom leaving the clean oil on top. The cleanest way is to dump oil and sludge in a paper bag that is suspended over a bucket or sitting in something like a dish drainer sitting in a small tub. There are probably a hundred variations of these methods and all will work. Just buy a second batch of oil to put in the saw while the first batch is filtering or settling then every time you clean the saw you have clean oil to put back in. I do not use my saw constantly so I just wait for the oil to settle out and put it back in. You will loose a little every time but it doesn't amount to much. I pay $22 per gallon so there is no way I am going to throw any of it away.

I have a dish drainer sitting in a tub so I have somewhere to put the rocks when I take them out of the clamp. The oil drains down off of them into the tub within a couple of days. Then they either go out the door (bad rock) or get put in the slab grabber so I can cut the last of the stone. I have a lot of bad stones here because of too many fractures and I do not want to throw away the oil that is left on all of them. It doesn't amount to very much because my saw is not running constantly but every little bit helps. I can see that if my saw was running constantly there would be a lot of oil collected in that tub.
Jim
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« Reply #14 on: September 30, 2012, 07:06:57 am »

What I do is drill some holes in an appropriate sized bucket and put in a sturdy paper grocery bag.  Suspend said bucket over another bucket using saw horses or something.
Pour the saw snot into the top bucket...the paper bag will become saturated with oil and the remainder will drip into the catch bucket.
This will take some time.  I recover appx. 50%.


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Nancie
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