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January 18, 2019, 05:05:57 am
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The Art of Gem Carving (Video)

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Author Topic: The Art of Gem Carving (Video)  (Read 3988 times)
3rdRockFromTheFun
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« on: August 14, 2012, 07:23:25 pm »

Ran across this doing some agate research. Since Pete had mentioned copper burrs the other day I found it interesting to such burrs in use in this video.

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« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2012, 08:20:15 pm »

That was very cool. yes It looked like he was using pretty simple tools. He had a steady hand too. Thanks, Eric.
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helens
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« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2012, 08:52:18 pm »

That is REALLY cool. I just learned more about carving in that one video than I did ruining stones and tools for months:). I had no idea that you should use grit with the actual carving tools, I thought grit was only used with felt bobs and wondered why I wasn't getting anywhere mangling stones with dry diamond bits and then splattering grit all over myself with felt bobs. I'm not kidding either.

Thanks Frank, great find!!
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3rdRockFromTheFun
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« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2012, 09:34:43 pm »

I've run across it before but this time I was not letting it get away!

Yah I got a kick out of it as it seems he's wanting to get close as he can to using old techniques (like how he whacked that rock apart in the beginning).

Regardless, the use of copper with grit brought Pete to mind as he'd mentioned it the other day.

Helen - not sure I'd use grit with regular diamond burrs - copper is soft and will grip the diamond (even charging with it over time) like copper laps.

He had some fancy burrs - I'd bet you could get decent result with much cruder ones. I've thought about soldering copper tips to used up burs and shaping it with diamond or SiC. I have a decent amount of .25" copper plumbing tubing that looks at least like it would be good to play with. Haven't tried any of this yet - too caught up in study lately (and still working rounds daily 'til it feels 'good' at least).
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« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2012, 09:44:09 pm »

Well, my short trials in carving left me in complete admiration of carvers!! Mostly the splattering things all over myself. I would go play with the dremel for an hour, go inside, and I'd look like I stood in front of a giant fan blowing mud splatters on me so I was speckled from head to toe.  That and my dremel bits keep sliding out of the chuck as I worked it.

That said, that video (and Jim, who explained to me that I am supposed to wrench tighten the chuck with the bits in them instead of just hand tightening and turning them on) made me think of possibly giving it another shot... 
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« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2012, 10:00:57 pm »

You and I both need to get foredoms Helen - they'll go much slower than a dremel (less diamond in the eye) while retaining good torque.

I can't afford those beauties so I'm going to go for a harbor freight knock-off:

http://www.harborfreight.com/flexible-shaft-grinder-and-carver-40432.html#pr-header-40432

I notice Kingsley North and one or two other places sell what seems to amount to the semi-rigid diamond like on my Ameritool lap but for use with the flex shaft rotary tools like above. This would be a blessing as the polishing aspect is what makes my heart stop. They're a bit pricey but if they last like the lap pads do then should be worth it.

I haven't tried a lot of carving - once twice - maybe thrice. My biggest problem was simply not being very artistic, lol (gee this sounds like a promising venture!). I'll carve stick figures!
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helens
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« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2012, 10:31:02 pm »

Well, that one you showed is 15,000 RPM!!! How do you figure it's slower than a dremel:P????

I have a multi-pro dremel... I forgot how slow the slowest setting is, but I THINK it's 5,000 rpm? It still throws mud all over me!!!!

Oh! I learned a while ago to wear glasses, because I decided the first 2 times I had to stand at the sink running water into my eye for an hour, that maybe getting grit in my eye was not a good idea...

That said, my glasses get about 1/2" of mud on them while I'm doing it and the visibility becomes difficult. If the little bits actually cut skin, I'd probably have no finger tips (like I had no fingernails)!!!! LMAO!!

Ok ok, it's not that bad (only almost that bad:P).

I would definitely save for whatever Kurt or Daniel uses if you don't have one yet... probably Foredom. Because you CAN resell it if you decide it's not for you (if you buy it used, you probably sell it for the same price you bought it for), while you can't resell the Harbor Freight if you decide you don't want it later. And I think 15,000 RPM is way too fast for carving (I don't know... someone who carves needs to weigh in here).

Jim does really gorgeous carvings with softer stone, he uses hand tools and dental picks on them. Maybe that's a better route to start with, it's the SPRAY that gets me about carving!!!
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« Reply #7 on: August 14, 2012, 10:38:14 pm »

Well, that one you showed is 15,000 RPM!!! How do you figure it's slower than a dremel:P????

I have a multi-pro dremel... I forgot how slow the slowest setting is, but I THINK it's 5,000 rpm? It still throws mud all over me!!!!

Oh! I learned a while ago to wear glasses, because I decided the first 2 times I had to stand at the sink running water into my eye for an hour, that maybe getting grit in my eye was not a good idea...

That said, my glasses get about 1/2" of mud on them while I'm doing it and the visibility becomes difficult. If the little bits actually cut skin, I'd probably have no finger tips (like I had no fingernails)!!!! LMAO!!

Ok ok, it's not that bad (only almost that bad:P).

I would definitely save for whatever Kurt or Daniel uses if you don't have one yet... probably Foredom. Because you CAN resell it if you decide it's not for you (if you buy it used, you probably sell it for the same price you bought it for), while you can't resell the Harbor Freight if you decide you don't want it later. And I think 15,000 RPM is way too fast for carving (I don't know... someone who carves needs to weigh in here).

Jim does really gorgeous carvings with softer stone, he uses hand tools and dental picks on them. Maybe that's a better route to start with, it's the SPRAY that gets me about carving!!!


Slower with ____torque____ . Try slowing your dremel down and then grinding something with it - it just stalls. Not these things - they keep grinding.

You can go as fast as the tools and grit will allow. If you're getting sprayed with diamond - the rock bit is losing diamond - not good. For finer grits and smaller tips you can probably go faster but still have to watch the heat.

I have heard of of some who use the pneumatic high speed tools - up to 400Krpms!!!! Beyond my scope of knowledge how they manage that without going through a burr a second...
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« Reply #8 on: August 14, 2012, 10:49:16 pm »

Hrm... my dremel never ever stalled... it happily kept throwing grit on me the whole time.

The stalling comment tho, made me wonder if I was applying too little pressure. HRM.
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« Reply #9 on: August 14, 2012, 10:51:36 pm »

Hrm... my dremel never ever stalled... it happily kept throwing grit on me the whole time.

The stalling comment tho, made me wonder if I was applying too little pressure. HRM.

Yah, they just don't have the torque - they're designed for speed not strength. Read the carving threads for loooooots more on this.
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« Reply #10 on: August 15, 2012, 01:52:38 am »


I would definitely save for whatever Kurt or Daniel uses if you don't have one yet... probably Foredom.


Hello...
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« Reply #11 on: August 15, 2012, 03:33:12 am »

Had Dremel before, 3 speed something. Lasted about a year and had to be rewired several times (burned some of the wires from the power inlet) as I had it running for too long at a time at heavy duty that it is not designed for. Other than that, it worked just fine. Cleaning more often would have likely extended its lifespan considerably.  saved2

I dont know what Daniel uses, but I use something exactly like the one in the link of Frank. Cost is exactly the same here in the shops. The only difference in the specs is that mine runs on 22000rpm. The foot-pedal could slow it down all the way to 500rpm.

Never tried, as I don't have a fixed workstation. So I always run it at full speed, which might be the reason that I have to replace the flexishaft internals every other month, but at 3$ a piece for replacement, that's OK. Also, running those speeds, is one of the reasons why cutting things is something that does not like me much, grinding is fine though. Polish is a mixed bag of beans and usually I have to be careful not to overheat the stone. If I remember right, Bobby1 has somewhere here a tutorial explaining rpm's for different tasks and results.
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3rdRockFromTheFun
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« Reply #12 on: August 15, 2012, 07:53:11 am »


I would definitely save for whatever Kurt or Daniel uses if you don't have one yet... probably Foredom.


Hello...


Don't you use a foredom Pete? I thought I saw you mention a dremel once too (perhaps it was in a cursing sort of manner...) ??
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3rdRockFromTheFun
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« Reply #13 on: August 15, 2012, 07:57:14 am »

Well Kurt I thought it was you but obviously not - so who then was it pumping my spongy brain with notions that I ought to toss the dremel for a real tool like a foredom or a knockoff so I could get the lower speeds with higher torque dunno

Don't make me go look it up... crackthewhip
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« Reply #14 on: August 15, 2012, 08:56:55 am »

Well Kurt I thought it was you but obviously not - so who then was it pumping my spongy brain with notions that I ought to toss the dremel for a real tool like a foredom or a knockoff so I could get the lower speeds with higher torque dunno

Don't make me go look it up... crackthewhip
saved4 saved4 saved4....that's me Frank... saved2, i used foredom and also Proxon.....foredom has good torque in lower speed or higher at 35000 rpm and Proxon has more stable speed from 500 to 20000 rpm also more comfort on hand but less torque so it is suitable for finishing with rolled sandpaper or diamond paste and cotton  yes
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