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16  Stone Talk / Moderator, Hummingbirdstones ( Robin ) / Share Our Finished Cabochons and General Cabbing Questions / Tutorials / Re: Source for clear material for triplets? on: December 03, 2015, 03:15:05 pm
I've always used optical quartz for quality pieces of opal.  However, I have used pieces from a broken plate glass window (abt. 1/4" thk.)for lower quality stuff.  When I need another piece of glass I just walk over to the broken window and whack it with a hammer.  I then flat lap the glass with a 220 grit to give me a good flat bonding surface. So far all the glass has made wonderful caps for triplets & you really can't tell the difference between the glass & quartz (without a scratch test).

We recently had a picture window replaced & I asked the installer what they would do with the old one that had lost it's seal.  He said they would just break it up and haul it to the landfill.  Therefore, I would guess you could get a piece of plate glass at your nearest glass store before they break it up. 
17  Stone Talk / Moderator, Hummingbirdstones ( Robin ) / Share Our Finished Cabochons and General Cabbing Questions / Tutorials / Re: new chrysocolla cab on: December 03, 2015, 03:04:29 pm
Nice cab! That second photo with the dark background really shows off the colors.
18  The Gathering / Our Place / Re: Is there a name for this type art on: November 30, 2015, 08:22:50 pm
Reminds me of a joke I heard awhile back:

What did the Norwegian say when he saw his first pizza?

"Who threw up on the lefse?" (pronounced lef-sah)

Sorry, but that's what I thought about when I saw that "art".   bricks
19  Creative Stone Works / Moderator, Michael Hoover / Intarsias / Commesso, and Composite Type Cabs / Tutorials / Re: Patriotic cab on: November 28, 2015, 10:01:28 pm
Ken, If you read a little further in the article where I believe you got the cougar picture that you posted you would see this:

Intarsia is a "woodworking" technique that uses varied shapes, sizes, and species of wood fitted together to create a mosaic-like picture with an illusion of depth. Intarsia is created through the selection of different types of wood, using their natural grain pattern and color (but can involve the use of stains and dyes) to create variations in the pattern. After selecting the specific woods to be used within the pattern, each piece is then individually cut, shaped, and finished. Sometimes areas of the pattern are raised to create more depth. Once the individual pieces are complete, they are fitted together like a jig-saw puzzle and glued to wood backing which is sometimes cut to the outline shape of the image, often with the intention of creating a three-dimensional effect as seen in the studiolo of the Palazzo Ducale, Urbino.

However, on this forum we are talking "stone" intarsia, not wood intarsia.  If you read a little further in the above article, about stone (or marble) intarsia, you would see this:

Marble intarsia (opere di commessi), called pietre dura in English for the semi-precious hardstones combined with colored marbles that are employed, is an intarsia of coloured stones inlaid in white or black marble. Early examples in Florence date from the mid fifteenth century and reached a peak of refinement and complexity in revetments of the Medici Chapel, produced under Medici patronage in the Opificio delle Pietre Dure, which was established by Ferdinando I de’ Medici. Later complex designs and refinement of the art developed in Naples circa the beginning of the 17th century. The floor of St. Peter's Basilica in Rome is a particularly notable example of marble intarsia. Later this form of decoration became a feature of baroque interior design, particularly so in the Sicilian Baroque designs following the earthquake of 1693.

I went on a European tour a few years ago, and one of the places I went to was St. Peter's Basilica (which is actually in Vatican City).   I have personally observed the marble intarsia floor in St. Peter's Basilica in Rome and I can assure you that the stones are not individually domed.

Look at the famous pietre dure created by Giovanni Montelatici in the late 1800s.  You will note that there are no individually domed pieces in it
either.

For another definition on stone intarsia note this:

Intarsia
This technique involves pieces of stone or wood of the same thickness, carefully cut to shape so that they fit together into a design without gaps. Sometimes referred to as inlay, particularly when the pieces are set into a solid background. Stone intarsia is often called pietre dure.
Notice that there is no mention of "domed" pieces here either. 

With all of this said, my piece on this thread is a composite cabochon, not intarsia, per se.   haveaniceday2





20  Creative Stone Works / Moderator, Michael Hoover / Intarsias / Commesso, and Composite Type Cabs / Tutorials / Composite from the amethyst sage claim on: November 13, 2015, 11:06:58 am
My friend, Woody, and his wife, Kathy, met Dale Hewitt at the Amethyst sage pit and bought some interesting material from him.  Dale said the pink/salmon color is what a lot of the people are looking for nowadays.  Woody gave me a slab from the site and this is what I made from it. It is 3" wide.  This material has a few calcite spots in it and is generally softer than the other amethyst sage, but the colors are striking for material from this site. I thought the other side of the slab was nicer, but it didn't have the horse in it. 
 

See the horse (if you're into caveman drawings)?  It's a buckskin.  The buckskin color is better when seen in person.

Thanks for looking!
21  Creative Stone Works / Moderator, Michael Hoover / Intarsias / Commesso, and Composite Type Cabs / Tutorials / Tahoma composite on: November 12, 2015, 11:55:03 am
Here is a Tahoma composite I recently finished.  The outer border is Saddle Mt. petrified wood.  It is about 2 1/2" tall.



And an older Tahoma just for a little variety.  The interesting thing about this one is that the upper and lower inner frame lines are natural - only the side frames had to be glued in.



Thanks for looking.  I hope these post OK.  I couldn't get the "preview" button to work while making this post.
22  Creative Stone Works / Moderator, Michael Hoover / Intarsias / Commesso, and Composite Type Cabs / Tutorials / Re: Patriotic cab on: October 11, 2015, 11:07:56 pm
Question:  thinking13

Is this intarsia or marquetry? I believe it is the latter as intarsia should have domed individual pieces (think cabochon), while marquetry has a flush surface. At least these are the definitions I was aware of when I did woodworking. 

Just my opinion hide bricks

ken S.

I don't think it fits the technical definition of either one (btw, intarsia is not made up of multiple domed pieces).   Because it is made of several different materials it is a "composite".   Because it is domed it is a cabochon.  Ergo, it is a "composite cabochon".  You should try it if you're tired of doing regular cabs.  I try not to get hung up on definitions and just enjoy the results of my work.
23  Creative Stone Works / Moderator, Michael Hoover / Intarsias / Commesso, and Composite Type Cabs / Tutorials / Re: Patriotic cab on: October 09, 2015, 09:58:48 am
Thanks for the compliment.  I thought it might end up as a bolo tie.

Not much action on the rock/gem forums anymore.  Everybody must be on Facebook.  I had an account on FB but dropped it because it was too invasive.
24  Creative Stone Works / Moderator, Michael Hoover / Intarsias / Commesso, and Composite Type Cabs / Tutorials / Patriotic cab on: October 07, 2015, 09:40:00 pm
Hi All,

Patriotic because of the colors. 

It's been way too long since I've posted anything here.  I thought I would show you my latest composite cab.  The center piece is agate from central Oregon that I found a few years ago.  The frames are basanite and howlite.   The border is moss agate.     The dome of the cab gives sort of an odd perspective on the frame thickness.

It is 2 1/4 inches tall.



Thanks for looking.
25  Custom Designed Jewelry / Show Your Custom Jewelry Designing Photos / Re: Kelly Mine Smithsonite Wire Wrap on: August 27, 2015, 04:03:45 pm
Beautiful stone and wrap!!  Thanks for posting it.  I wrapped a similar stone for a friend and had no clue what it was, but I think it is the same stone. 

Here is a picture of it.  Do you think it is Smithsonite?


26  Stone Talk / Moderator, Hummingbirdstones ( Robin ) / Share Our Finished Cabochons and General Cabbing Questions / Tutorials / Re: Three finished Today on: May 25, 2015, 09:24:40 pm
Nice job on all 3.  I especially like the jasper - haven't seen this type before.
27  Stone Talk / Moderator, Hummingbirdstones ( Robin ) / Share Our Finished Cabochons and General Cabbing Questions / Tutorials / A few interesting cabs (pic heavy) on: May 25, 2015, 09:24:03 am
Hi All,

Here are a few cabs I recently finished.  I hope you enjoy looking at them.

A lady in our rock club had this piece of Montana agate with a bird (heron?) in it.  She asked me to cab it for her, so I took a picture before I gave it back to her. This piece is extremely thin.


Another Montana agate with a bison (bull ?) in it.


An Ochoco agate I dug earlier this month (backed with dark green obsidian).  It is about 2 1/2 inches tall.  Will probably become a bolo tie cab.
  Backlit

Another Montana that is unusual:


A Dryhead agate or Teepee Canyon (not sure):


Agate from remote area in central Oregon:


A lapis with a little turquoise inserted where the fracture used to be:


Red drusy from the Toutle (WA) area.  Sides and back are polished, ready for groove-wrapping.  I just put this one in because I had never seen red drusy before.


Arizona moss agate:


A lapis with crystals & pyrite left on (at bottom).  You can't tell from this picture, but there is a lot of pyrite at the bottom.

Thanks for looking!
28  Stone Talk / Moderator, Hummingbirdstones ( Robin ) / Share Our Finished Cabochons and General Cabbing Questions / Tutorials / Re: Vistaite Cabs on: April 15, 2015, 10:21:50 pm
Very nice work! Your composite cab is outstanding, I really like the way the brown curves into the green instead of being straight cut. It looks so much classier. Are you going to put it in a setting?

Thanks for the comment Marty.  The composite cab will probably be groove-wrapped in GF.  I kind of like the concept of the magnetic brooches too, but my magnets haven't arrived yet, so I'll see which way grabs me first.
29  Stone Talk / Moderator, Hummingbirdstones ( Robin ) / Share Our Finished Cabochons and General Cabbing Questions / Tutorials / Vistaite Cabs on: April 15, 2015, 07:27:24 pm
Rocks2dust sent me some vistaite slabs to do something with. 

Here are the slabs:


Here's what I did with them:






Thanks R2d.   That is nice jasper!  Takes a great polish.
30  Stone Talk / Moderator, Hummingbirdstones ( Robin ) / Rough on the bench and slabs off the saw (general minerals board) / Re: Owyhee Picture Jaspers, and surrounding area. on: April 14, 2015, 01:20:21 pm
This is a great thread.  I love jasper but usually have trouble identifying the less obvious ones.  I also enjoyed looking at the link, (worldofjaspers.com I think it was called) that is mentioned by jakesrocks, in a recent post he made to this thread.  Wow - what gorgeous eye candy!
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