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Stabilizing wood, bone, and horn

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Author Topic: Stabilizing wood, bone, and horn  (Read 2855 times)
NuevoMundo
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« Reply #15 on: February 10, 2012, 01:41:14 pm »

When I was watching that video, it occurred to me that it would probably be better to use mason jars, since they are generally thicker than most jars, and because they come in the wide-mouthed variety so you can fit in the largest slab or piece of rough possible, with no need to fill up a whole lot of excess volume with stabilizing product (think about how much it would cost to fill a jar with HXTAL!).
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Enchantra
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« Reply #16 on: February 10, 2012, 03:35:35 pm »

This is the first time I've seen this thread for some reason.
That's perfect.  It's like the cheapest way to stabilize.  I have a lot of rock here that should be stabilized before use and that is frankly a perfect setup.  I'll have to do a road trip up to Harbor Freight a half hour from here with a friend of mine and check that hand pump out.  Once I set it up I will have to test it out on a block of wood I had set aside for carving to see how it works for me.  I actually have that minwax wood hardener here too.  Bet it would work wonders for stablizing Mammoth ivory.
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jackd
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« Reply #17 on: April 27, 2012, 04:07:14 pm »

Great possibilities !!
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ScarlettoSara
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« Reply #18 on: April 27, 2012, 06:41:21 pm »

I miss Gina so much:(
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― Walt Whitman, Song of Myself
NuevoMundo
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« Reply #19 on: April 27, 2012, 09:52:47 pm »

I miss Gina so much:(


me too!
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Hummingbirdstones
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« Reply #20 on: April 27, 2012, 09:57:34 pm »

Me three!

Gina always made me smile.
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« Reply #21 on: May 25, 2012, 09:41:19 am »

Has anyone tried this with rock? What's the best stabilizer to use for rock? Would there be any advantage to making a chamber for stabilizing rock that could do something like 10 or more times this amount of vacuum, or not?

Also, is there such a thing as a stabilizer that can be sonically cured? I know they make special epoxies and glues that stabilize when exposed to UV, but it just seems like it would be great if you could vacuum a stabilizer completely into a rock and then set it in an ultrasonic tub set to the stabilizing freq and *poof* it hardens through and through.
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« Reply #22 on: May 25, 2012, 10:10:03 am »

I bought a Harbor Freight brake bleeder and adapted it to vacuum test chainsaws. Works great. I acquired a bell jar and sheet of 1/4 inch rubber, but have not set it up  for vacuum yet. The bleeder is just a simple hand held /actuated vacuum pump.
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« Reply #23 on: May 25, 2012, 09:34:39 pm »

A shop light and Hxtal will work a lot better.....   dancer5   

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3rdRockFromTheFun
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« Reply #24 on: May 26, 2012, 12:28:05 am »

A shop light and Hxtal will work a lot better.....   dancer5   



What about a shop light, Hxtal AND a vacuum?
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NuevoMundo
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« Reply #25 on: May 26, 2012, 04:34:14 am »

I find this an attractive option for materials like turquoise, porous dino bone, etc where treating rough or whole slabs with hxtal would not be a very economical option given the low price/quality of rough and the amount of liquid it would absorb.
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sealdaddy
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« Reply #26 on: April 07, 2013, 08:13:32 am »

I find this an attractive option for materials like turquoise, porous dino bone, etc where treating rough or whole slabs with hxtal would not be a very economical option given the low price/quality of rough and the amount of liquid it would absorb.
Right~!
I use this great product, called "Cactus Juice" to stabilize my slaps and rocks in a vacuum.
It is very reasonably priced, Plus is Reusable...because this resin is only a One Part resin, and stores for reuse in the refrigerator, or cooler room temperatures.
What is not drawn into the rock is used again, and again.
THAT makes it Incredibly cost effective~!!
I use a thick round glass jar, and a HF break bleeder hand pump to get pressure down to 26 "Hg.
You can get down to 29.5 "Hg, with the "Cactus Juice" seller's chamber and an air compressor to vacuum setup.
It is Amazing to watch all the bubbles of air rise out of my rocks, which means this resin is taking it's place inside my rocks~!!
Cactus Juice's seller also lives in TX., and he invited me to his shop.
He treated the test rocks I brought with me in one of his chambers. I heat cured them in a toaster oven (the way to do it, if only dealing with smaller amounts of rock, bone, etc.) for 45 mins at 225*.
Then I sliced, drilled and polished them, all with Zero fractures or breaking on even the most unstable of my rocks.
You really should look into this stuff, if you are interested~!!

Here is his video on using it for very hard wood, like Oak.
http://www.turntex.com/index.php?option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=121
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PhilNM
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« Reply #27 on: April 07, 2013, 09:33:24 am »

Hi.
Am on a dialup, so can't do video's.
Have any more info on the cactus juice? website or anything?
Thanks!
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sealdaddy
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« Reply #28 on: April 07, 2013, 09:44:14 am »

Hi.
Am on a dialup, so can't do video's.
Have any more info on the cactus juice? website or anything?
Thanks!
Sure...Here, keep in mine he is marketing it for wood pen making, other customers use it making knife handles, but other customers use it for stabilizing Turquoise, and rocks:
http://www.turntex.com/index.php?option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=121...
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sealdaddy
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« Reply #29 on: April 26, 2013, 03:13:51 pm »

I use that HF hand vacuum pump on a round thick sided glass pickle jar.
What do you use to stabilize your rocks, friend?


* stabilizing.jpg (379.08 KB, 1280x960 - viewed 13 times.)
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