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Cutting a really good girdle

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bgast1
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« Reply #15 on: December 26, 2011, 11:05:19 am »

I went back and read my book and looked at the pictures. Turns out that the way I cut my cabs I do indeed get a girldle automatically. The only difference is that I do not mark a girdle line around the side. I most always end up with nice edges but I think that my cabs might look better in the end if I rounded the edges more.
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Auntie Rocks
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« Reply #16 on: December 26, 2011, 11:20:28 am »

I learned silversmithing and stone bezel setting long before I learned how to cut cabs and cut my freeform stones with those lessons in mind. The flat girdle bevel at about 10 degrees, the bottom bevel at 45 degrees and a buff top are the cleanest and most problem free stones to set.
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bgast1
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« Reply #17 on: December 26, 2011, 11:27:40 am »

What I do with all of my cabs is cut a 10 degree to 15 degree bevel all the way down the side of the cab. I also cut about a 45 degree bevel on the back side or bottom of the cab. I try to insure that I have a perfectly symmetrical dome on the cab. Some domes are higher than others but they are also even all the way around the cab.
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hulagrub
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« Reply #18 on: December 26, 2011, 12:09:46 pm »

Bob, I'm with you on the symmetrcal dome. Have been working on these two turquoise cabs. The first one is what I strive for, and the second is down right ugly. Both will be set in silver and we'll see how they turn out then.




The second one is on a 10 penny nail, so it is small and soft, which equals for me really hard to do.
I also like the rounded top edge!
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Dave, a certified Rockaholic

bgast1
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« Reply #19 on: December 26, 2011, 01:10:58 pm »

Dave, it's the Turquoise. I've only cabbed it once and had a tough time with it. I have some Sleeping Beauty Turquoise but most of it is too small to cab. I have been thinking about getting some Turquoise large enough to cab though. I really like the looks of that Sleeping Beauty though.
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Steve
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« Reply #20 on: December 26, 2011, 01:18:38 pm »

Bob, I'm with you on the symmetrcal dome. Have been working on these two turquoise cabs. The first one is what I strive for, and the second is down right ugly. Both will be set in silver and we'll see how they turn out then.
The second one is on a 10 penny nail, so it is small and soft, which equals for me really hard to do.
I also like the rounded top edge!

Dave, it's the Turquoise. I've only cabbed it once and had a tough time with it. I have some Sleeping Beauty Turquoise but most of it is too small to cab. I have been thinking about getting some Turquoise large enough to cab though. I really like the looks of that Sleeping Beauty though.

When doing small turquoise I'll get them down to pretty much the shape I want on my wheel up to 400 grit and then polish them up with either Zam or Fabuluster.  Then I'll take a good look at the symatry, flat spots, etc and go to hand sanding, usually with wet 400 grit wet/dry sand-paper to balance it out and smooth any flat stuff.  I might hit it with 600 grit also then back to the polishing wheel.  Turquoise can be tough, especially small stuff because it is on the softer side.............
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hulagrub
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« Reply #21 on: December 26, 2011, 01:35:51 pm »

Thanks Steve! Great idea, I've never thought of hand sanding turquoise.
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pete
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« Reply #22 on: December 28, 2011, 02:24:34 am »

If I'm cutting a normal to high dome, I don't worry about the setting bevel. Usually only on very low domes and flat tops do I think about the setting and try to cut its bevel between about 5 to 25 degrees. The back bevel I always aim for 45 degrees but it's depth depends on the stone dimensions and the type of bezel that might surround it. Enough at least to allow for my dubious soldering jobs on the bezel!
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anthonyroman
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« Reply #23 on: May 05, 2014, 11:31:50 am »

The pattern on the petrified wood seems quite fascinating! All the pieces are eye-catching and really pretty.
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