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Enough already

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dickb
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« Reply #15 on: November 16, 2011, 01:21:25 pm »

About gluing lexan plastic. I bought my plastic from Home Depot as the acrylic plastic commonly called lexan. I got the .200 thickness I think. When I tried to glue it together with PVC cement, it didn't stick very well and kept coming apart. So I went to the hardware store and got a product called WELD-ON #3 for acrylics. It's also made in a thicker version with a different # of the product. What  I got is water clear and used to repair fish tanks. I roughed up the surfaces with sand paper before gluing and it held well. I think I would like to try the thicker glue so it would form a fillet in the corners. I have to make pans and shields for the arbor I'm making now, so I would like to see the dimensions you used for your shields.

Nice job on them and at least they can't rust without buying stainless steel.

Thanks for your post showing us what you did.  yippie

Dickb
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« Reply #16 on: November 16, 2011, 04:58:41 pm »

ASSEMBLY HELP
  You will need access to a good table saw, carpenterís square and bar clamps.  A fine tooth blade in the table saw will make this project go much easier.
   The order of assembly is important.  Glue the two end plates to the back first, making sure they are square when clamped.  The side plates must be glued to the ends of the back plate.   Then these three parts to the base.  You will need three bar clamps and four spring clamps or equivalent for this operation.  Now put in the dividers.  I used a piece of wood and large rock to help hold the back of these down while the glue set.  Next the top and finally the two front pieces.  Doing it this way prevents putting the joints together improperly and avoids difficult handling.  Just make sure the side plates are glued to the outside edges of the back plate so the three pieces wind up 22Ē long and everything else will be automatically correct.
  The divider pieces are full height and depth to help make the entire unit more rigid and to keep water off the drive belt and motor as much as possible.
  Exact dimension of the divider plate cutout will depend on your arbor.  Making the belt cutout access large will make mounting the arbor much easier.  Do not cut sharp internal corners.  This causes stress risers and eventually cracks.  Putting the divider plates as close to the arbor as practical will allow you to use whatever wheel you wish without fear of hitting the divider plate.
   I used white Gorilla Glue and roughed the mating surfaces but your choice of material will have an affect on what works best.  I already had a large amount of plexiglass but if I were to go out and buy material I would have preferred Lexan (polycarbonate) or polypropelene.  Polypro would require a plastic welder as it will not respond to adhesive.  After completion I sealed the pans with clear silicone caulk.  (Letís just say my glue job was less than perfect.)
  Drill holes in the center to match your arbor and use these bolt holes to mount the unit to a piece of plywood.  IMPORTANT!  You must have a spacer between the bottom plate and the arbor base.  I used two sheets of plexiglass, but wood will do.  Same underneath.  If the metal base of the arbor or the bolt heads are in direct contact with the plexi it is guaranteed to crack.  This is less problem with lexan and nearly nonexistent with polypro.  If your spacer plate fills the entire width between the divider plates, then the resulting tray in front becomes a very handy place for work in progress.
  I found from using Highland Park units that the drain should be in the bottom, not in the back plate as that arrangement causes blockage in the elbow which is very difficult to keep clear.  This will require holes in both the mounting board and the bench unless they are at the front.  In my units I put the drains in the rear so the lines would not be in the way of my knees.  Wherever you put them you will want to tilt the unit toward the drain.  I also put the drip valves near the back to give the water a little more time to spread out before reaching the work area.  Iím not sure it makes any difference in reality, but the carpet in front certainly does.  It also reduces splash to only a very fine mist.  If you look closely at the carpet you may see that it actually rides on the wheel.  Iíve found this helps keep the wheel clean and reduces splash much more effectively than a hard shield that does not make contact.  You will need to think about this in advance when determining your bolt pattern for the arbor.
  The first unit took two days to complete.  The next two took one day each.  I hope this instruction makes it that much easier for you.
  My water supply is a cascade filtered five gallon bucket and submersible pump.  The cascade removes 100% of particulates large enough to detect.  It consists of simply hanging one bucket above another above another.  In practice there is only one inch difference in rim height between any two.
   I have not shown a wrist rest, but you will definitely want something wider than the quarter inch of plastic.  I leave that to your creativity.  If I could find it I would like to use a polypropylene closed cell foam rod, sliced half way to center and slipped over the front plate.  So far no luck.
  I'll try posting these pdf files a few at a time

* BACK PLATE.PDF (17.38 KB - downloaded 70 times.)
* BOTTOM PLATE.PDF (17.22 KB - downloaded 42 times.)
* DIVIDER PLATE.PDF (18.11 KB - downloaded 42 times.)
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slabbercabber
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« Reply #17 on: November 16, 2011, 05:01:25 pm »

One more after this.

* FRONT SHIELD.PDF (16.47 KB - downloaded 50 times.)
* SHELL.PDF (41.57 KB - downloaded 45 times.)
* SIDE PLATE.PDF (17.2 KB - downloaded 38 times.)
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« Reply #18 on: November 16, 2011, 05:09:14 pm »

If you use lexan, there is a solvent cement that works well.  I forgot to mention that excess Gorrilla glue can be scraped off very cleanly with a sharp chisel after it has set up but before it get fully cured.  Generally speaking that means from one to six hours.  If you really want to spend money on the very best, get two part urethane adhesive from Loctite.  I have specified it for adhering tungsten carbide to steel instead of brazing.  It works just as well.  The advantage of Gorrilla glue is that it will fill gaps from bad cuts.

* TOP PLATE.PDF (16.15 KB - downloaded 33 times.)
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dickb
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« Reply #19 on: November 17, 2011, 11:11:01 am »

Hi Slabber:

Thanks for taking the time to post the PDF plans. I downloaded all the plans to my hard drive and now I have some hard numbers to build the shields for my home made arbor. When I get it finished, I'll post a couple pics of the unit. It's one of my winter projects this year.

I just bought some slabbets from Gregor to work on when it's done.

I just got to say one of the things that I really like about this forum is the way the members are willing to help each other out and encourage each other.

Thanks again.  yes

Dickb
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« Reply #20 on: November 17, 2011, 07:44:27 pm »


I have a quick question.  Using the fine tooth blade on the table saw, does it tend to burn the plastic/lexan ?

TOG
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-Gary

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« Reply #21 on: November 18, 2011, 05:28:03 am »

More teeth will definitely increase the heat generated.  A high quality table saw with a three horse motor and a sharp blade will allow you to push the plastic through fast enough to keep it from melting.  Just don't try it with a crosscut blade.  I used a ten inch 60 tooth ATB.
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Rocksnot
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« Reply #22 on: November 18, 2011, 01:06:51 pm »

Awesome drawings!  mine are usually pencil sketches on scratch pad in shop these are like store bought plans!!  TYVM

A thought about that closed cell foam rod you spoke about in the write up...
Many of the backer rod materials may be just the thing.  I have seen them / used them to pack into the joint of concrete (like between the drive and the wall) before pouring in the self leveling butyl caulk.  I have seen them in open and closed cell so you would have to check around your area.  Suggest if you know anyone on commercial concrete work, ask them.  Might even get hooked up with a couple feet for free!  I have seen it form 3/8" to 1 1/2" dia and I bet if you make a little jig to hold it straight and flat that a buzz through the say would make a perfect groove for the plexi edge.
Once again - GREAT WORK and THANKS for sharing it !
 yippie
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« Reply #23 on: November 18, 2011, 05:05:27 pm »

Thanks, Rocksnot, I'll try that.  I also thought about pipe insulation, but I think your suggestion is better.  I have now used the units for a day and found some things that need to be improved.  Making the enclosures clear allowed me to see that the water drip at the rear is a bad idea.  Most of the water runs off the back of the wheel and down the drain.  Something I missed with the wood prototype. Not a problem for my recirculating system, but if you are using tap water or worse yet a bucket system it really hurts.  Also, a lot of water goes past the center baffles and into the center section.  I did not seal the center so it leaks out onto the plywood base.  The center section needs to be sealed .  Better would have been to form the center section to much more closely match the arbor and implace a thin rubber shield.
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« Reply #24 on: November 19, 2011, 08:52:27 am »

here is a pic of my first plastic shroud with water built in the front because that is all I had ever seen and it seems to work for this unit.

(have to add thanks to Mike for the sponge idea!  without the sponge it was more of a shop sprinkler :P  )


* Left grinder.jpg (166.66 KB, 640x480 - viewed 30 times.)
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« Reply #25 on: January 03, 2012, 07:22:58 am »

Please do post those step by steps!!!
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David

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« Reply #26 on: January 03, 2012, 08:05:17 pm »

More teeth will definitely increase the heat generated.  A high quality table saw with a three horse motor and a sharp blade will allow you to push the plastic through fast enough to keep it from melting.  Just don't try it with a crosscut blade.  I used a ten inch 60 tooth ATB.

Thanks, I'm there with the blade/saw.

TOG
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Of all the things I've lost..I miss my mind the most.

Whether you think you can, or you think you can't, you're probably right.
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