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shop exhaust venting

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Author Topic: shop exhaust venting  (Read 698 times)
LynxSphinx
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« on: March 20, 2011, 09:04:59 am »

Hello Board,


   Does anyone utilize venting in their shops? I am moving my soldering area and my lapidary area from my garrage to a utillity room. S.Florida Summers turn everything not under A.C. into an oven. I was employing two 240 cfm duct booster fans to vent my fumes and would like to get some proper blowers. The fans in a can were kind of noisy and another member of my house would complain, so I am hoping to find a quiet one. I also will be using them to vent buffing particles. I plan on building boxes around my buffers and polishers and run exhaust lines to vent the dust from them as well. Does anyone have any recomendations of makers of blowers and retailers that have the best prices?
    Those of you who are soldering or buffing in areas that are enclosed and do not have venting should look into it for your own health.
                                       Thanks
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Bentiron
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« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2011, 05:28:23 pm »

Noise is always going to be a problem with the fans in a box. I went to Harbor Freight and bought one of their all plastic drying fans to put in the filter box I made for my polishing units. It is noisy too but since it is in a box with pleated filters on the front some of the noise is cut down before it goes outside. If I were to line the filter box with rigid foam insulation it would cut the noise down further. This bright orange fan sucks around 600 CFM. I don't know how big you room is but it may provide enough air flow for a polishing unit and a soldering station. Harbor freight also has a big gray carpet drying fan that you could hook up and exhaust duct to each side, it moves a lot of air at a fairly low velocity so it should be some quieter yet. If you don't want either of those fans take a look at a Penn Ventilator Co., Zyper exhaust fan series, they are real quiet.
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MrsWTownsend
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« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2011, 05:43:54 pm »

I open the back door...  Does that count? 

Actually, I have the lower half of a Torit on my back patio but it's too humongous to put in any of my crafting areas (except the back patio).  That thing does some serious filtering...

http://www.donaldson.com/en/industrialair/powercore/index.html  It's kind of like the second picture from the top in this link, an older model I am sure.
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thewrightthings
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« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2011, 08:10:55 pm »

I've used a small shop vac hooked up to the box where I polish.  Works well.  Can always put a sound baffle around it.
For my soldering, cut a hole in the wall and put in a simple, inexpensive exhaust fan(the hole and wiring cost more!).  Problem is that it is not airtight in the winter, when not in use, so built and insulated box to fit over it, when not being used.
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metalartz
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« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2011, 08:29:12 pm »

for a quiet fan look for a inline blower fan.  sorry don't have a name at the moment.

I have mine mounted to vent out side,  the fan is mounted close to the out side wall so that the duct is under vacuum and not pressure so there are not leaks.

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Rocksnot
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« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2011, 10:20:39 am »

Been using exhaust in my basement shop for longer than I been doing rocks (lots o smelly hobbies)

I use a squirrel cage fan with the fan mounted to the wall by a window and run ducts to the areas that I want the suction. Use duct caps when not in use.  not very noisy at all.

One thing to remember Exhaust fans mean the air is leaving.  This means the air has to come in from somewhere.  In a well sealed house the exhaust fan may be limited by how much air it can get from the house to exhaust (like putting your hand over the suction side of a shop vac - no air in = no air out) 
In the summer mine sucks the AC out of the house and in the winter it sucks out the heat.  makes for less comfort and higher bills during the hard weather times.  In extreme weather I may just not do what ever needs the fan because it is going to be a hardship.  Like this winter when it was -10*  sucking out the heat would be a bad choice :(   Same goes for the summer here to :(  but  I have used reducer fittings to get it down from 6 and 8 inch to 4 inch and use hose to get the exhaust right to where its needed to help minimize the loss of heat and AC.

Over all it has been working great for several years (10+)  and I can talk on the phone right next to it and still hear LOL.
I would love to get / build an external weather tight shutter/damper for it.  The winter gets cold <brrrr> and all the metal ducting makes the shop area like a fridge.  the summer doesn't seem to effect the temp much (when not in use) thank goodness ;)
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LynxSphinx
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« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2011, 07:47:38 pm »

Thanks for the insight Guys and Gals. I was thinking of a powerful inline blower perhaps an 8" and reducing down when I get to the spots I want suction. Now I think I will be checking out some squirel cage blowers if they are that quiet. Talking on the phone right by it, is pretty low on the d.bs.
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hulagrub
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« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2011, 07:53:26 pm »

We have a range hood, just above our soldering area. There is a bonus to it, two more lights!
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skystone
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« Reply #8 on: March 21, 2011, 10:46:38 pm »

Yes a stove hood type venting fan works quite nicely. I have a double squirl fan from an old hood I bought at a thrift store. I built it into a plywood box with two openings behind the wheels on my buffer. Used a piece of furnace filter between a couple of pieces of screen to filter. Then used drier vent duct to the outside. It's plugged into one power strip with the buffer motor. So when one is on the other is too. Can't even hear the fan motor for the buffer sound. works like a charm. Didn't cost much to build either. Not the $300 or so a bought one would.
Mike
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Rockoteer
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« Reply #9 on: March 22, 2011, 10:11:54 am »


Excellent idea Dave.

TOG
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-Gary

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Whether you think you can, or you think you can't, you're probably right.
Bentiron
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« Reply #10 on: March 22, 2011, 05:17:55 pm »

There are ways to overcome the make up air problem when exhausting air. Right now I'm having a big brain phart but when I doing HVAC design we were putting in these boxes that had heat exchangers in them, one side was exhaust air and the other side was make up air. The exhaust air would if it was warm would would give up that heat to the coils in the box and warm the outside air coming in and do just the opposite in the summer, it was a passive system, no moving parts. We would put it on all sorts of schools, businesses, and even homes that had good tight buildings. It save a lot of energy for them. I wish that mind had not decided to take a short vacation just now as these were great systems to install. I recommended on to a fellow that had a bid fish store that was spending a ton of money on heating and cooling here in Phoenix and he paid for the system in two years. It was so hot and humid in his store that he had to do a lot of exhaust winter and summer and out here we get HOT in the summer so it saved him a lot of money then and in the winter he didn't need to run the heater all that often either because of the all the heat in the air he was exhausting because of the heat it already contained. He was recovering almost all of that so his heater almost never ran. These devices just had closed tubes full of refrigerant that would evaporate and condense without the use of power.
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« Reply #11 on: March 22, 2011, 10:54:47 pm »


I  just crack the big garage door and open the man door on the other end.  KISS...

TOG
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-Gary

Of all the things I've lost..I miss my mind the most.

Whether you think you can, or you think you can't, you're probably right.
Rocksnot
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« Reply #12 on: March 23, 2011, 11:36:36 am »


I  just crack the big garage door and open the man door on the other end.  KISS...

TOG

no no no - that's just to simple!   LOL  "KISS"  ura
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« Reply #13 on: March 23, 2011, 10:34:34 pm »


You of course know it means 'Keep it simple, stupid'....I refer to myself when I use that term..no one else...just me..

TOG
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-Gary

Of all the things I've lost..I miss my mind the most.

Whether you think you can, or you think you can't, you're probably right.
Rocksnot
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« Reply #14 on: March 24, 2011, 10:00:09 am »

hahaha yup.  work in the computer field now and the end users are not always savvy so we do try to KISS a lot! 
Now I am just envious that you have a garage that has the man door in the back :)  yes  you must have good weather often!
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