A community forum for lapidaries of every imaginable gemstone related niche to gather. Sharing a great many topics. Generally beginning with discoveries of various minerals, cutting, shaping and finishing cabochons right on up to and including the designing of jewelry and other gemstone related artwork.

Photobucket

Donations keep the forum free from advertisements and purchases photo hosting MB space.

Dave ( hulagrub ) is the winner for our March cab contest with this beautiful Marfa Plume Agate cab !

 photo dave_zpsouefabbp.jpg


Helios Red Helios Green Helios Blue Helios Purple
Lapidary / Gemstone Community Forum
April 27, 2015, 08:00:10 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
  Home Help Search Classifieds Gallery Links Classified / Auctions Staff List Login Register  

Olympic Poppy Jasper

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Olympic Poppy Jasper  (Read 898 times)
GoodEarth
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 361



View Profile
« on: September 28, 2010, 10:27:20 am »

Olympic Poppy Jasper is not a new stone. I found it first described in a book from the 1930's (unfortunately I cannot remember the title or author) as Egypt jasper. I has since been called several different names, including Crescent Poppy Jasper, but I have settled on calling it Olympic, as it occurs as an erosion in the Olympic Mountains in Washington State.

It has been found mostly as beach pebbles along the Pacific coast on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington state. I have met several old timers around these parts that have been collecting from road gravels along an old landslide zone at Crescent Lake. I personally collected this stone for years before finding my location, and securing my source.

I believe that most of the specimens that have made it into the market in the past have been what I have determined to be "B" grade. "B" Grade has small dots or poppies, usually bright red to dark tan/brown, without a second color inside the poppy, or very small dual color poppies. I used to collect on the beaches and gravels, and would go several collecting trips without finding a single piece of high grade. But when we did! Wow!

High Grade has multiple colors included in the poppies, and usually has a bright background color that contrasts to the color of the poppies. The eyes are much larger than the "b" grade, sometimes up to 1/4" across. I am finding that it occurs in veins in the basalt, and usually fractures out along the vein. The material has a moderate amount of fracturing, which is to be expected from this earthquake prone area, but solid slabs can be had. I usually trim the rough stone with my hammer prior to chucking into the saw, and then sometimes break the slabs along any fracture lines that show up in sawing.

Enough for now, on to the PHOTOS!









« Last Edit: September 28, 2010, 10:29:05 am by GoodEarth » Report Spam   Logged

Social Buttons

Taogem
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 12130



View Profile
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2010, 10:59:28 am »

Sure is beautiful Poppy !  yes

Report Spam   Logged

hulagrub
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 6474


When you cultivate man, you turn up all the clods


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2010, 11:07:21 am »

Very nice! And when are you to start selling?
Report Spam   Logged

Dave, a certified Rockaholic

GoodEarth
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 361



View Profile
« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2010, 12:23:33 pm »

Hula -

I have started selling already. I some of this to a show in July and did fairly well. I was pretty green and didn't have my grades differentiated very well, but response was positive.

I am not sure about this forum's rules on Self Promotion, so I am hesitant about listing prices, but you can PM me for details.

Thanks!
Report Spam   Logged

philosophersstone357
Guest
« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2010, 02:23:19 pm »

That is some wonderful poppy jasper! It was not really clear that the jasper you are now finding is still float or did you actully find a deposit.
Report Spam   Logged
ScarlettoSara
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 8963


Somewhere over the rainbow... way up high


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2010, 03:37:23 pm »

Very nice, an eye popper:)
Hey what is your name if you dont mind me asking, so we dont have to call you Good Earth unless you were named after your Mama or something:)
Thanks for going in detail about the stone and the story behind it. I like that part as much as seeing them:)
YOu got any of this rock cabbed up please?
Report Spam   Logged

"I tramp a perpetual journey.
― Walt Whitman, Song of Myself
Taogem
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 12130



View Profile
« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2010, 04:31:56 pm »



I am not sure about this forum's rules on Self Promotion, so I am hesitant about listing prices, but you can PM me for details.


Feel free to post within the "Shop and Swap" part of the forum. You can go into as much detail as needed...

Thank you for thinking about the rules ...
Report Spam   Logged

GoodEarth
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 361



View Profile
« Reply #7 on: September 28, 2010, 07:36:33 pm »

Philosopher-

this stone seems to occur in a slump zone from a *huge* landslide about 300 years ago. I have found a deposit of host basalt that is ranging in size from sand all the way up to house sized boulders. The typical jasper inclusion is in veins, and can run up to 8" wide with the highest grade usually being less than 2 -3" wide and deep. I am breaking the veins out of the boulders and processing into graded buckets (nearly) as we speak.

Scarlett-

Joshua is the name. Good Earth is my business. Photos of cabs coming soon!

Thanks again for the kind words!
Report Spam   Logged

CRAIGCIS
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: February 10, 2015, 03:50:25 pm »

I have been a rockhound for 56 years now and have just recently begun working with the poppy jaspers.  I know, you are probably asking, "What took you so long?"  Who knows?  Head buried in the agate or gem silica.  I don't know.  The thing is that now that I am looking at them, I am really appreciating what beautiful stones they are and am doing my best to collect a bit of each specie that I can.
  This Olympic Poppy Jasper caught my eye on Ebay where I am currently bidding on a hand full of red that has black poppies.  But then I typed it into Google and this came up, and WOW!  Your stuff is way more beautiful than what is on Ebay.  How do I get some?
Craig
Report Spam   Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum | Buy traffic for your forum/website

Powered by SMF | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines