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Purples

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Author Topic: Purples  (Read 39715 times)
Rock Wrapsody
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« on: August 08, 2010, 07:28:04 pm »

I am trying to take pics of my pendants.  Everything comes out true to color except purples.  They come out blue!  I am using a light tent and two florescent daytime bulbs.  I have a Nikon Coolpix P90 that is in the Auto mode with no flash.  Any ideas?
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thewrightthings
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« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2010, 09:26:33 pm »

I am trying to take pics of my pendants.  Everything comes out true to color except purples.  They come out blue!  I am using a light tent and two florescent daytime bulbs.  I have a Nikon Coolpix P90 that is in the Auto mode with no flash.  Any ideas?

Yup, keep trying!  Try different color backgrounds.  Sometimes that helps.
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Michael S Hoover - Redrummd
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« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2010, 10:01:07 pm »

I think you will need incadescent or halogen lights.  I find that if you have a really bright window to shoot with daylight mixed in - your colors will be closer to right.
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Freeform
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« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2010, 10:17:13 pm »

always have a neutral gray background so setting your auto light control in your camera. Allot of folks dont know about light metering with cameras.  Most cameras have mutl metered zones in the sensor that are only briefly touched upon in the Manuel. 

Having a neutral gray card or as close to neutral gray color background, just for getting a response from your cameras light meter is very important in my opinion. You dont have to use it as a background, but still take a couple shots with it.  Colors will react very different to reflected light coming off your background. And if the light meter is not balanced first, weak colors light blue and purple will not always react like they do in sunlight, or to the eye in person.

Or in cases of a recent thread i read on another forum were purple was in the rock in the photos, but not in person when the buyer got the rough. Cameras can pull in color through refraction which our eye doesnt pick up as well as the camera lens.
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deb193
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« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2010, 11:54:11 pm »

Shain, are you saying that taking a few preliminary shots of the gray background helps set the metering for subsequent shots?
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Freeform
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« Reply #5 on: August 09, 2010, 03:16:24 am »

yes, warming the light meter in the camera as i like to think of it.
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deb193
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« Reply #6 on: August 09, 2010, 08:42:36 am »

"warming" I like the analogy. ABout how many subsequent shots will the effect persist once opbjects are placed in foreground if background is left in place?
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Freeform
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« Reply #7 on: August 09, 2010, 11:10:12 am »

once balanced, it might still be effected by very black, or very white stones for example. Generally with the gray card still in place. If that happens, move the camera so the meter zone(lAF zone most likely the same zone) reacts to the background color for a moment, then re-adjust the shot if needed. Since stones are often highly reflected with light, they can mess with the meter quite a bit.

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hulagrub
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« Reply #8 on: August 09, 2010, 04:27:44 pm »

On our Kodak I had to learn how to get to the macro settings, not on auto. Also the daylight bulbs do a good job, and you avoid funny colors when using the macro. Have also toyed with the backgrounds, and tend to like a light gray, but not always.
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Chris C
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« Reply #9 on: August 13, 2010, 08:35:12 pm »

I am having the EXACT same issues when photographing my opals!

Thus far, I have tried EVERYTHING and still NOT had a solution to this issue yet.

In my mind, I'm starting to think it is an actual issue with the characteristics of the camera's CCD or processing itself, as I have tried setting the white balance custom, taken pictures in EVERY kind of lighting from direct sunlight to LED's, florescent, incandescent, and I've even added UV light source, as well as tried many filters, but nothing seems to make the camera be able to capture the purple in my opals, they always appear really BLUE.

I'm actually afraid to list some of my purplish stones for sale, as the look like blue on black, not purple/blue on black, and I don't want to be accused of false advertising!

Has anyone out there figured this issue out yet?

I've tried 2 different cameras, and even 2 different video cameras, all the same!
Hmmm.......

Chris ;)
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Freeform
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« Reply #10 on: August 14, 2010, 07:01:42 am »

I honestly dont think there really is a way to solve it yet, except through photoshop.  Those colors are far to weak in the spectrum and some camera lens, actually will effect that end of the spectrum more than the photo light sensor. I personally have only used Olympus brand cameras because of how well and true they build their lens. (actually built by the company that used to build Zeiss lens and camera, some of the best old lens in the world)

But even with todays digital cameras, i find it more important about understanding color saturation and how light effects it, through the lens and not the light meter. Also why in manuals they really dont touch up on the light meter as much as they used to with old 35mm SLR's.

What i would suggest is Halogen lighting if you haven't already. And if you sell items with color problems, compared to the photo and in person. Just simple note it to the buyer and a smart buyer will read into and ask if there really is a concern. Or, as most buyers we like to be, educated to the fact that opals never look as good in a photo as they do in person. Part of the nature of it i say.
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Freeform
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« Reply #11 on: August 14, 2010, 07:05:58 am »

Sheri, i just noted i missed something originally in your post.

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florescent daytime bulbs

ANd i feel like a dumbass, this is why your getting blue. I suspect your background may be white? These bulbs are not ture daylight when it comes to color, they are when it comes to lumens. They produce a Blue color spectrum top fool our eye into thinking we are outside.  THey are much better than regular florenscents of any kind, but will shift your colors to blue.  Halogen all the way i say.
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ScarlettoSara
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« Reply #12 on: August 14, 2010, 08:35:14 am »

LOLOL Shain I feel like a dumbass everyday but it takes a real man to ever admit to being one:)
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« Reply #13 on: August 14, 2010, 09:36:14 am »

I was thinking that the fluorescents could be the problem too, since they tend towards blue light, while the incadescents tend toward yellow.  On Windows 7 i use Windows Live Photo Gallery and there is a "Fix" window and it has a color temperature tool that corrects for color temperature problems.  I was wondering too, if when you take pics of a purple object outside, does it tend towards blue because of all the blue light reflected back by the blue sky? (unless its cloudy that day)

Mark
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Freeform
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« Reply #14 on: August 14, 2010, 11:17:47 am »

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I was wondering too, if when you take pics of a purple object outside, does it tend towards blue because of all the blue light reflected back by the blue sky? (unless its cloudy that day)

Mark, it wouldn't because of UV. The blue sky is a trick too, simple because blue gets weeded out of the pack of colors because its week. Through refraction, not reflection. And UV really helps refract blue out of the spectrum. And sunsets and sunrises really show the UV the best through reflection and refraction.  But mostly reflection.  Also in the early morning or late evening we see the "sweet light" the sun produces through UV. even if there are no clouds to produce a reflection of UV,  the light is warmer to the eye, heavy yellows/ambers can be seen everywere. Yellow being the strongest color and whys its one of the rarest in nature.

 I love watching NASA sun images, esp the one recently that has allot of folks think is cuaseing the heat waves and mass wild fires in Russia.
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