Helios Red Helios Green Helios Blue Helios Purple

Lapidary / Gemstone Community Forum
June 23, 2017, 05:57:28 am
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: This Forum has moved to a new host.  Please go to http://lapidaryforum.net/group/index.php and sign up so you can participate.  You will no longer be able to post here.  It is now a read-only archive.
 
  Home Help Search Classifieds Gallery Links Classified / Auctions Staff List Login Register  

Reading rocks

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Reading rocks  (Read 265 times)
zurn
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 81


View Profile
« on: December 05, 2015, 10:25:29 am »

Hello all
This may be totally irrelevant ,obvious ,or just plain silly, and if I'm off track shut me down now.
I've been accumulating rocks,slabs minerals and other such things.
So I'm asking the people with rock reading experience to share what to look for either in the
field hunting rocks or at the bench just before flicking the switch on the saw.
Looking at a chunk of rough jasper what to avoid and so on. Do rocks have like wood a grain a proper direction.these are the questions in my rock head.
Walking along a path or on a beach strewn with all sorts of stuff that attract people like us walker. Are there other indicator signs to watch for to bring us to the jack pot
Some of what I ask I know is kinda hard to put in words
To put it simply as far as cutting cabs how to get the best and most out of a chunk of rough.
Any insight or wisdom is greatly appreciated.
In the short time since joining I've gotten so much from this forum and I thank you all.
Report Spam   Logged

Social Buttons

jakesrocks
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2112


New Toy.


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2015, 11:43:14 am »

If your rock has obvious cracks, try to avoid them. No quicker way to ruin a blade than have a rock split along a crack while cutting. If the rock has lots of cracks, it's better to whack it with a hammer & feed it to a rock tumbler.

When in doubt about which way to cut a rock, If patterns are visible on most surfaces dip it in a bucket of water & look carefully at the patterns from different cutting angles. The rock will tell you which angle will give you the best patterns.

If the rock is covered with matrix or a crust, I'll usually grind several small windows & try to determine the best angle to cut slabs from.
Report Spam   Logged

A day spent without learning something new, is a day wasted.

Don

zurn
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 81


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2015, 01:08:37 pm »

Thats the kind of info I'm looking for
thanks Don
Like your quote as well
 keep it coming folks yes
Report Spam   Logged

jakesrocks
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2112


New Toy.


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2015, 01:21:57 pm »

For beach rocks or something you may find just walking, carry a squirt bottle of water with you.  If you pick up an interesting rock, give it a little squirt of water. If the water dries quickly the rock is probably too soft to take a shine.

If there's a fresh chip out of the rock, look at the break. If it's conchoidal or appears glassy, it's most likely hard enough to take a good shine.

If I'm looking for rocks along a path, I like to go out early in the morning or late in the afternoon. I walk facing the sun. Light will reflect off of rocks hard enough to take a shine, making it easy to spot them.

Go out during or right after a rain. Wet rocks will show the colors they contain. Whereas dry, dusty rocks won't.
Report Spam   Logged

A day spent without learning something new, is a day wasted.

Don

zurn
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 81


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2015, 03:35:34 pm »

I live in a neighborhood Of Boston in the south west corner.
there is a river the Charles you may have heard of it
in some areas along river is red granite that protrudes here and there
these are the signs if in fact it is one that i am speaking of what lives near red granite typically
Im taking a little walk with my dogs in morning along the banks
if I find anything Ill let ya know
Report Spam   Logged

Justin
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 404


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2015, 09:47:50 pm »

For beach rocks  look for the little fingernail crescents on the surface. These are tiny conchoidal fractures and mean that it's something that will take a polish, probably agate or jasper. Another clue is a waxy surface when dry. 
You can always take what you collect at the beach and throw it in a tumbler. Keep notes of what it looked like before it went in, and then see what takes a polish and what does not.
Report Spam   Logged
peruano
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 88


Central New Mexico


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2015, 06:03:05 am »

I'm tactile.  Picking up the rock and handling it with a bare hand is important to judging whether it has a smooth feel of agate or grittier feel of quartzite etc.  An agate may be rough on the outside but if you can find a chipped place or small break rub that to see with your fingers the microcrystalline structure that polishes so well.
Contrast - a black and white, or black, white and red agate is more interesting than a black one (sometimes).
Intense colors versus subtle ones.  Some stones have beautiful colors and patterns but they are just not intense enough in color and contrast to show well even when polished (or they are lower visible anyway).
A solid stone is always preferable to a cracked or pitted one, but a lot of pitted ones are solid on the inside.
Cut along that crack, not across it unless you are willing to settle for two or more smaller cabs when it breaks as you are sawing, or while you are cabbing.
There are a million other characteristics to be considered.  That's what keeps our minds sharp and promotes long life.  Enjoy.  Tom 
Report Spam   Logged

Tom
Zoologist turned to Rocks
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum | Buy traffic for your forum/website

Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines