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Riveting stones ... together.

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Author Topic: Riveting stones ... together.  (Read 417 times)
lithicbeads
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« on: September 04, 2013, 11:19:36 pm »

 Any thoughts out there about riveting stones together with the rivet(s) being a design element?
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rocks2dust
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« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2013, 12:12:07 am »

Any thoughts out there about riveting stones together with the rivet(s) being a design element?
I've seen some stone panels held by silver (and gold) rivets with larger heads that had been nicely chased. No rule that they have to be a plain round button. I've also seen where the rivets have held a stone. Then there are the rivets used to hold the garnet, gold and millefiori glass plaques in this piece (I'll trade several of my nicest gemrocks for one of these please). The same could be used to hold together stones.

What I really like, though I only have seen in museums, is lapidary puzzlework where the pieces in the entire composition lock together (no glue or anything) tightly. I recall a few such pieces available back in the Dark Ages (aka, my youth) and wish I'd begged to get one (if I just had a time machine, I have a whole shopping list of things I could pick up cheap). There is always one "key" piece that unlocks all the pieces if you want. Those completely blow my mind, but puzzlework seems to be becoming a lost art even in wood, ivory, metal, etc., let alone lapidary. I could only find a single image (and its not stone, though way cool) on google: here.

Then there are those puzzle balls that get me salivating. See the video of a jade puzzle ball being cut at the bottom of this page. Neither of those last 2 really has much to do with your question, but somehow that is where my wandering brain cells (both of them) took me.
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tetonartgallery
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« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2013, 12:14:23 am »

Here is a crappy (old flip phone camera) picture of a large turquoise slab that I drilled with 4 holes and  riveted to a silver back pate using the rivets as design element. The stone on the bail was riveted on with a single rivet. Rivets were tubular sterling with balls soldered on one end and I flared the backside.


* bigtq.jpg (80.99 KB, 504x634 - viewed 9 times.)
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rocks2dust
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« Reply #3 on: September 05, 2013, 12:27:16 am »

You are right that the picture could be better, but it is good enough to show that you made an exciting design choice.
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Helene
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« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2013, 06:59:23 am »

Yes Frank, I think riveting stones together is a good approach and can open many design doors.  Funny you mention it because I have been playing with that concept.  Most that I've seen is when accent stones are riveted on top of a stone.   Plain stone or a bezeld stone, set on top or sunk.  Riveting stones together from the side view is the direction I'm thinking, this way one stone is not covering another.

What about a tube rivet?  Now that would be simple and the tube rivet will have more metal overlapping the stone giving a stronger connection.  It all depends on the design and connection.

Below is one of my favorite jewelry artists, because he custom cuts all his stones.  The lapidary is as important as the metal work.  You don't see that very often.
Also his creative approach in setting stones.

http://www.michaelboyd.com/Home.html

The book below is very useful.

http://www.amazon.com/Creative-Stonesetting-John-Cogswell/dp/1929565224
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Bentiron
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« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2013, 12:53:28 pm »

Having riveted cabochons back to back I have found that tube rivets made of annealed silver work best as the swage over easier that solid rivets that may cause the stones to crack. I have also use dead soft copper tube rivets to hold cabochons to copper backing plates. Last time I was at Goodwill's half price day I was eying some knitting needles with using them as tube rivets but I haven't figured out how to anneal them, they are really hard. dunno
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HarveyDunn
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« Reply #6 on: September 05, 2013, 03:19:42 pm »

Tetonartgallery, how did you flare the back of the rivet? I thought that was done by bashing it with something...but how could you bash the back without running the risk of breaking the stone?
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tetonartgallery
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« Reply #7 on: September 06, 2013, 09:35:59 am »

Carefully!
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Thanks for looking - Gerard
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Bentiron
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« Reply #8 on: September 06, 2013, 03:39:43 pm »

First you form the front side of the rivet, then on the back side, or at least the the way I do it, is to cut it just slightly proud of the countersink and gently upset it into the said countersink, no bashing allowed. yes
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urbtaf
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« Reply #9 on: September 06, 2013, 03:48:42 pm »

Tetonartgallery, how did you flare the back of the rivet? I thought that was done by bashing it with something...but how could you bash the back without running the risk of breaking the stone?
Ive seen tube flared by using a G clamp with cone shaped ends, just tighten up the clamp slowly and watch the pressure.
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Bentiron
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« Reply #10 on: September 06, 2013, 04:30:25 pm »

I usually just use a burnisher to flare the ends.
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tetonartgallery
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« Reply #11 on: September 06, 2013, 04:30:51 pm »

I wasn't trying to be a smart ass, I only had a second to respond and thought most know how to set a rivet.  I solder a ball onto the end of a hollow sterling tube, cut the tube so the length is just beyond the thickness of the stone and the meta (about 1/16").  I then flare the end with a center punch (carefully) and use a rounded punch to set the rivet tight (carefully). hand pressure like setting a bezel.

I like the C-Clamp Idea I may have to make one of those if I do more of these rivet jobs.
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Thanks for looking - Gerard
Click here to see My Web Site
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