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Plume Agate Doublet - How It Was Done

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Author Topic: Plume Agate Doublet - How It Was Done  (Read 1845 times)
Bentiron
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« Reply #15 on: June 11, 2013, 04:29:24 pm »

The work of a true Master Lapidary and Jewelry Artist, well done.
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legendarygranite
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« Reply #16 on: June 11, 2013, 07:50:47 pm »

The work of a true Master Lapidary and Jewelry Artist, well done.
I couldn't agree more, I really enjoy all of his stones and via internet you sometimes for get how big they are.
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helens
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« Reply #17 on: June 11, 2013, 08:13:41 pm »

Yep... I LOVE your gigantic cabs!!!! My little cabmate can't even fit more than a 2" wide surface in it, so I can't go that size, but I totally admire yours!!
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southerly
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« Reply #18 on: June 12, 2013, 04:27:49 am »

Beautiful work as always Bob. Keep sharing those secrets, love them.

David
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Debbie K
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« Reply #19 on: June 12, 2013, 07:43:44 am »

Beautiful stone and beautiful job, and I love that your back is so finished. That's the hallmark of a real pro.

Debbie K
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pacog
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« Reply #20 on: June 12, 2013, 09:06:26 am »

Great little write up Bob. Just to let you know your web site link does not seem to be wowrking? Might want to get that handled.
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bgast1
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« Reply #21 on: June 12, 2013, 09:11:39 am »

Thank you for sharing this Bob, I always appreciate it. I can't tell you thank you for all you share enough!!
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unclestu
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« Reply #22 on: March 04, 2014, 04:50:23 pm »

I am always in awe with your work, amd I really love and appreciate the way you explain everything step by step.  This doublet is amazing to say the least.  I am not clear as to what you meant in your tutorial when you wrote the following:
" I used a plate of glass and tumbling grit to grind both pieces perfectly flat and then mixed up and applied Epoxy 330 to glue them together."
 In what manner did you use the plate of glass and tumbling grit to grind both pieces perfectly flat?
Thanks for the great lesson.
Stu
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john likes rocks!
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« Reply #23 on: March 04, 2014, 06:16:53 pm »

Thank you for taking the time to show us how you do that Bob, great pix & tutorial!  yes
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domdeslagons
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« Reply #24 on: March 25, 2014, 11:46:52 pm »

Wahou! Great work, you seems to have some awesome intarsia among that too! Those cabs are stunning!
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bobby1
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« Reply #25 on: March 26, 2014, 09:43:42 am »

Stu,
I don't have a flat lap (I used to have one but the motor burned out so I tossed it) so instead of using a machine to get flat backs I just use a piece of window glass and tumbling grit to get the pieces flat. I put a bit of tumbling grit  starting with 220 grit from an old salt shaker on the glass, add a few drops of water and move the piece around on the glass/grit surface in a figure 8 pattern. I add grit as necessary until the saw marks are gone and the surface has an even frosty appearance. I then go to 400 grit and do the same until the pits from the coarse grit are gone and the piece has an even, finer frosty appearance. It is now ready to glue to the other piece that has been flattened in the same manner. I do this with the glass placed in an aluminum tray to contain the grit/water slurry and keep my bench less dirty. The process goes rather quickly because by being able to add fresh grit  it keeps things going right along. With a diamond wheel flat lap the wheel keeps getting duller with use and it can take quite a while to lap something flat.
When I teach about making doublets and triplets I use this method because many of my students don't have a flat lap. This method is cheap and easy.
Bob
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womanwithatorch
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« Reply #26 on: August 25, 2014, 07:36:31 pm »

I just discovered this tutorial.  Thank you !  You have answered all the doublet questions I've been wondering about and your Plume Agate cab is amazing! 
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Janice, womanwithatorch.com

"I am always doing that which I cannot do, in order that I may learn how to do it." Pablo Picasso
wyrock
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« Reply #27 on: August 27, 2014, 07:05:24 pm »

Not sure how I missed this awesome tut. Thanks Bobby.

One question if you check this again. How does the glass hold up being as soft as it is compared to the agate. It seems like it would wear down rapidly.
Jim
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Making rocks immortal one stone at a time.
Justin
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« Reply #28 on: August 27, 2014, 07:43:38 pm »

Not sure how I missed this awesome tut. Thanks Bobby.

One question if you check this again. How does the glass hold up being as soft as it is compared to the agate. It seems like it would wear down rapidly.
Jim

I've ground flats on a mirror before, and it started to dimple in the middle. What's fun is to get a few nice large slabs and use them. I started off with one and used it for 220. When it got smooth it became the 500 grit slab and so on. Eventually you have nice polished slabs as a side effect.
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wyrock
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« Reply #29 on: September 02, 2014, 11:16:48 pm »

Not sure how I missed this awesome tut. Thanks Bobby.

One question if you check this again. How does the glass hold up being as soft as it is compared to the agate. It seems like it would wear down rapidly.
Jim

I've ground flats on a mirror before, and it started to dimple in the middle. What's fun is to get a few nice large slabs and use them. I started off with one and used it for 220. When it got smooth it became the 500 grit slab and so on. Eventually you have nice polished slabs as a side effect.

Now that is one hell of a good idea. I have some pretty large slabs that would be perfect. Thanks a bazillion. I hope they are flat.
Jim
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Making rocks immortal one stone at a time.


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