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A pretty rare one.

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Author Topic: A pretty rare one.  (Read 5048 times)
jakesrocks
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« on: August 14, 2012, 03:02:23 pm »

This will be my first try at uploading a pic on this forum, so wish me luck.

Back in the early 50's, a discovery was made south of Mt. Signal, Imperial County, California. As a young teen I was lucky enough to know one of a very small handful of people who knew of this location, and was taken on a weekend dig

This concretion is known as a sand spike. They have only been found in this one location in all of the world. When found, they were wet and extremely soft. They had to be carefully removed from the sand and placed on a piece of plywood to dry in the sun. There were probably less than 10,000 collected, and most are now in museums and university collections.

When found, about 98 % of them were found to have the spike end facing west. Modern science has been unable to explain how they formed, or why most pointed west.

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helens
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« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2012, 03:07:53 pm »

Didn't work... Don the way I always do it (and you can link ANY picture online this way), is to get to the pix you want to link (not the thumbnail, the actual pix).

1. Right click the pix ... if in google chrome, you will get a "Copy Img URL" (you can do this to your photo in your photobucket or flicker). (clicking it copies that URL right to your clipboard, to verify that, you can just open another browser tab, paste it in to just see the photo).

2. Paste that URL here, and then highlight the entire link and click the button above that looks like a single picture (when you scroll over it, it says: "Insert Image" and it's the 2nd from the left on the bottom row.

I THINK that Firefox and IE both have the Copy Img URL also, but if not, I can check for you. I find Chrome fastest for forums, so I tend to use that:).
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jakesrocks
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« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2012, 03:12:56 pm »

No problem Helen. I figured it out. It works great with the IMG code from Photobucket. I tried to paste the shipping # from a package I'm expecting.  bricks
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« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2012, 03:27:10 pm »

No problem Helen. I figured it out. It works great with the IMG code from Photobucket. I tried to paste the shipping # from a package I'm expecting.  bricks

LOL! I've done that myself plenty when cutting and pasting:P!

I know what that is, it's a giant petrified cauliflower head:)!
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christopherl1234
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« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2012, 06:06:50 pm »

That is pretty interesting, I wonder how they formed?
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3rdRockFromTheFun
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« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2012, 09:26:32 pm »

I love this kind of stuff - great post Don yes

I have heard they study ocean floor core sample (mmm... this section tastes good! saved1 ) for directionality of ferrous compounds (continental shift, pole shift etc) and that some rocks can also give away info by the directionality of certain iron minerals in them.

This has to be a cake-taker here though - all that's missing from them is the banner reading, "Go west young man..."
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jakesrocks
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« Reply #6 on: August 15, 2012, 09:37:04 am »

It must have been a real sight when these were first discovered. As I understand, many were found laying on the surface. For the vast majority of them to be facing west must have really gotten the imaginative juices flowing. It's a shame they didn't have digital cameras when the site was first discovered. When I first saw the place, all of the surface collecting had been done, and many of the sand hills looked like giant gophers had been at work.

Helen, the sand spikes were only soft and fragile when first dug out of the sand. The surrounding sand was dry as a bone, but the spikes were wet. After drying in the hot desert sun for a few hours they hardened and could easily be handled.

Don't think they would have been very effective cave man clubs. The longest found was little more than a foot long.
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« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2012, 10:08:41 am »

Never see anything like that before, very interesting to know it......is that somthing fossilized? I did search for "cauliflower head" and found much receipt how to cook it..... dunno

Also did search for "sand spike" and found much of fishing rods..... hide
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« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2012, 10:22:46 am »

These folks have a pretty good writeup on sand spikes, and also have a few  for sale.
http://www.spiritrockshop.com/Sand_Spikes.html
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« Reply #9 on: August 15, 2012, 10:37:29 am »

Aahh...... so it is still a mistery.....extreme one, nice explanation there anyway and thanks Don yippie
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Daniel
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« Reply #10 on: August 15, 2012, 07:17:59 pm »

Never see anything like that before, very interesting to know it......is that somthing fossilized? I did search for "cauliflower head" and found much receipt how to cook it..... dunno

Also did search for "sand spike" and found much of fishing rods..... hide

LOL!! That cracked me up:)!!!

I also surmised to Don before that it was a ready made lazy caveman weapon... you find one on the ground, you can collect clubs to beat other cavemen with for very little effort:P. Then I read that they were too soft and now too small to use for prehistoric bats...

But it MOST looks like a cauliflower head:P. My favorite 'natural' things are things that mimic other things. Not that we needed a mimic for cauliflower heads, but the way that nature repeats certain patterns and images. The first time I saw a picture rock... millions of years old, and it LOOKED like a painting of a windblown landscape with a small lake and trees, I was completely hooked on rocks!!! That scene got 'painted' by nature millions of years ago... and we can find out HOW of course (silt, bones, mud, algae, lava, etc), but WHY those patterns?

For me, the new obsession about rocks isn't just about how PRETTY they are... but as I've mentioned before... it may be holding a BLUEPRINT for the future too. If so many of those rocks show scenes and objects of what existed in the PAST, and PRESENT how many rocks hold scenes not yet realized until the FUTURE? Does that make sense:)?
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chad
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« Reply #11 on: August 15, 2012, 07:26:55 pm »

Pretty cool.  Hadn't heard of these before.  Love a good natural mystery. 

Or unnatural...
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helens
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« Reply #12 on: August 15, 2012, 07:36:05 pm »

Hi Chad! Who is that guy:P?
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3rdRockFromTheFun
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« Reply #13 on: August 15, 2012, 08:45:10 pm »

Hair just like an ancient alien - "coincidence...? I think not!" chuckle
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« Reply #14 on: August 16, 2012, 10:55:07 am »

Never see anything like that before, very interesting to know it......is that somthing fossilized? I did search for "cauliflower head" and found much receipt how to cook it..... dunno

Also did search for "sand spike" and found much of fishing rods..... hide

LOL!! That cracked me up:)!!!

I also surmised to Don before that it was a ready made lazy caveman weapon... you find one on the ground, you can collect clubs to beat other cavemen with for very little effort:P. Then I read that they were too soft and now too small to use for prehistoric bats...

saved2 saved2 saved2 i was thought you really now that.....so you don't teaseme2 but it's really look likes a Mr Flintstone's bat.. chuckle
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Daniel
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